Henrico County VA

Famous Henrico Citizens: GABRIEL

(1776-1800)
Gabriel was a slave born in Henrico County in 1776 – the same year the United States became free from Great Britain. He was a blacksmith who lived on a tobacco plantation called Brookfield, owned by a man named Thomas Prosser.

Many slaves were not taught to read or write, but Gabriel was. By the time he was in his early 20s, Gabriel was considered intelligent by those who knew him.

Because he was a slave, Gabriel worked when and where Prosser told him to work. Sometimes Prosser made money by sending Gabriel to work for other people. During these experiences, Gabriel met and worked with other slaves and free men from around the world.

In Virginia at that time, about 40 percent of all residents of the state were slaves. Gabriel realized that he and other slaves should do something to try to become free. Secretly, he began talking with other slaves to organize a rebellion against slaveowners in Richmond as a way to accomplish that goal.

The rebellion was supposed to take place on Aug. 30, 1800, but the weather was too bad that day. Unfortunately for Gabriel, slaveowners began to hear about the plans, and the state militia caught Gabriel as he tried to escape.
The rebellion never occurred, and Gabriel and 25 other slaves were hanged for their attempt. But his attempt was important, because it showed that slaves were not willing to be treated as property of other people. They wanted to be free and were willing to fight for their freedom – just like America had fought for its freedom from Great Britain.

Eventually, slavery ended after the Northern states won the U.S. Civil War in 1865. Gabriel is viewed as a hero because he gave his life in pursuit of freedom for himself and others – because he knew that they deserved to be free.
Community

19th Annual Asian American Celebration planned May 21

The Asian American Society of Central Virginia will hold its 19th Annual Asian American Celebration on Saturday, May 21 at the Greater Richmond Convention Center, 403 N. 3rd St. in Richmond, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Admission is free.

The theme for this year’s celebration will be “Our Heritage," in recognition of May as the Asian Pacific American Heritage month, designated by the U.S. Congress in 1992. > Read more.

Sandston Founders Club honors Sydnor


The Founders Club of Sandston presented lifetime membership to Charles W. Sydnor at its 12th annual meeting last month.

Sydnor, who grew up in Sandston and later served as president of Emory and Henry College for eight years, was honored by Founder Club President Alice Taylor Baldwin at the April 23 event at Sandston Memorial Recreation Center. > Read more.
Entertainment

Cultural Arts Center announces summer class schedule


From Legos to wine tasting, The Cultural Arts Center is hosting a variety of classes this summer for both kids and adults.

Starting this month, the center has begun classes in a variety of subject areas, including: ceramics, music, painting, photography, confectionary arts, and many more. The classes are designed in part to promote creativity, culture and entertainment in the community. > Read more.






 

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CAT Theatre, located at 319 N. Wilkinson Rd., will present “Don’t Cry For Me, Margaret Mitchell” May 20 to June 4. This hilarious show is based on actual events from… Full text

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