Famous Henrico Citizens: GABRIEL

Gabriel was a slave born in Henrico County in 1776 – the same year the United States became free from Great Britain. He was a blacksmith who lived on a tobacco plantation called Brookfield, owned by a man named Thomas Prosser.

Many slaves were not taught to read or write, but Gabriel was. By the time he was in his early 20s, Gabriel was considered intelligent by those who knew him.

Because he was a slave, Gabriel worked when and where Prosser told him to work. Sometimes Prosser made money by sending Gabriel to work for other people. During these experiences, Gabriel met and worked with other slaves and free men from around the world.

In Virginia at that time, about 40 percent of all residents of the state were slaves. Gabriel realized that he and other slaves should do something to try to become free. Secretly, he began talking with other slaves to organize a rebellion against slaveowners in Richmond as a way to accomplish that goal.

The rebellion was supposed to take place on Aug. 30, 1800, but the weather was too bad that day. Unfortunately for Gabriel, slaveowners began to hear about the plans, and the state militia caught Gabriel as he tried to escape.
The rebellion never occurred, and Gabriel and 25 other slaves were hanged for their attempt. But his attempt was important, because it showed that slaves were not willing to be treated as property of other people. They wanted to be free and were willing to fight for their freedom – just like America had fought for its freedom from Great Britain.

Eventually, slavery ended after the Northern states won the U.S. Civil War in 1865. Gabriel is viewed as a hero because he gave his life in pursuit of freedom for himself and others – because he knew that they deserved to be free.

Reynolds CC to host sculptor Paul DiPasquale

Reynolds Community College will host Richmond sculptor Paul DiPasquale Sept. 28 as he shares his presentation “Art Talk, Why Art Matters” from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Conference Center Gallery of the Workforce Development and Conference Center on the Parham Road Campus, located at 1651 E. Parham Road in Richmond. This event is free and open to the public. > Read more.

Free children’s clothing for those in need

The Children's Clothing Closet at Highland Springs United Methodist Church will be open Saturday, Aug. 27 and Tuesday, Aug. 30 to provide free new or nearly new children's clothing for families in need, prior to the start of the school year. The Clothing Closet will be open from 10 a.m. to noon both days. The church is located at 22 North Holly Avenue. > Read more.

Weekend Top 10

Beautiful fall weather is back this weekend! Don’t leave your favorite pooch at home – take the whole family to Canine Companions’ DogFest Walk ‘n Roll at West Broad Village or FETCH a Cure’s annual Mutt Strutt at Deep Run Park. Pets are also welcome at this weekend’s Central Virginia Celtic Festival and Highland Games. Halloween events taking place Sunday include the University of Richmond’s 18th annual Trick or Treat Street and Goblins and Gourds at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.


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Jethro Tull’s Martin Barre will perform at 8 p.m. at The Tin Pan, 8982 Quioccasin Rd. For 43 years, Barre was the renowned guitarist of Jethro Tull. For the past five years he has toured the world with his own band to play the "classic" music from the Jethro Tull catalogue, and also many new tracks written by Barre from his albums “Away with Words” and “Order of Play” plus his latest album, “Back to Steel.” Tickets are $45 in advance and $50 at the door. For details, call 447-8189 or visit http://www.tinpanrva.com. Full text

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