Henrico County VA

Seeking answers for a senseless tragedy

On Aug. 30, while a woman I didn’t know was struggling for her life, I stood 50 feet away in a biting downpour, peering through a soaked camera lens, and took pictures.

I am still trying to understand how I should feel about that.

Her name was Betty Ann Richardson. Like most of us that evening, she was merely trying to drive home through the sudden chaos caused by Tropical Storm Gaston. But unlike the rest of us, she never made it.

Journalists are curious and wide-eyed by nature.

Sometimes, we wish we were not.

We enter this profession because we like to write, take pictures, educate others and tell stories untold. Some of us thrive under the never-ending rush of constant deadlines, others under the adrenaline of danger, intrigue and shock. Others prefer the friendlier pace of covering youth baseball games, county government and autumn parades.

I believe each form of journalism, when performed responsibly, is equally important.

As the Henrico Citizen celebrates its third anniversary this month, I am able to reflect on the events that have caused each form to find its way into our pages during the past three years.

Our first issue was published nine days after the Sept. 11 attacks, at a time when much seemed lost in a surreal haze and confusion. Writing about the opening of a new county library and volunteers who built homes for the poor didn’t seem terribly important at the time, but we did it anyway. Today, I am glad we did.

The following autumn, a similar eerie feeling swept through the community while police sought desperately to catch snipers who were terrorizing our region. One October morning, I found myself standing across the street from what would temporarily become the most famous gas station in the world – in the heart of Henrico – after police narrowly missed capturing the suspects at a pay phone there.

And last year at this time, we all experienced the devastation of Hurricane Isabel – which has left lingering effects for some even now.

These are not the events we hoped to cover when the Citizen began publishing three years ago. But in journalism, we don’t always have a choice.

Sometimes, quietly important community news swirls together in sudden and unforeseen ways with a national manhunt or a natural disaster. I’d like to say that experience eventually dictates how we react to these strange combinations – as humans and as journalists.

But after Tropical Storm Gaston left me with a memory I won’t soon shake, I don’t know that I’m any closer to being comfortable with my reactions as either one.

While Gaston was dumping more than a foot of rain on metro Richmond, my staff and I were toiling away on a deadline in our office, which sits directly across from Bryan Park in Lakeside. I thought little of the rain – other than to marvel at how much of it there seemed to be – until our intern phoned on her way home to warn us that standing water on Lakeside Avenue was blocking the flow of traffic at about 5:30 p.m.

Later, when our managing editor and I ventured out in the downpour after flooding knocked our power out, we saw a frightening sight: Richardson’s van, caught in the rising water, had stalled on Lakeside Avenue and was sitting on a sidewalk, angled nearly perpendicular to the road. It sat only about 50 feet from our office building.

As several Henrico firefighters closed the area to onlookers, others anchored a ladder truck in place with sturdy reinforcement legs. I rushed to my car to load a roll of film into my camera.

At the time, I believed I would be capturing a dramatic rescue on film. It would be the sort of moment that could provide inspiration to readers and show the lengths to which rescuers will go to protect the public. From such a devastating storm, I thought, it would be comforting to steal something positive and reassuring.

Rain slapped against my face one sheet at a time while I snapped pictures through a lens blurry with streaks of water.

In between shots, I watched a team of firefighters brave rapids that in some spots must have been 8 to 10 feet deep. They extended their truck’s ladder parallel over the raging waters and climbed its length in an attempt to secure the van and pull it from danger. Several entered the rushing water when it became clear they couldn’t reach Richardson otherwise.

One was set to plow through the rapids in a final attempt to pull her from the van when the water overcame the vehicle and pulled it over the embankment and into Jordan’s Branch below. It also took Richardson’s life.

The first rule of covering an emergency is to be a human being first and a journalist second. Carrying a notepad or camera doesn’t give someone the right to opt out of his responsibilities to a fellow human in need.

At the time, and I suppose in retrospect, I know there was nothing I could have done to save Betty Ann Richardson. She became Henrico’s only fatality in the terrible storm. Even the Henrico firefighters who tried desperately – valiantly – to do so, and who went far beyond reasonable expectations in their attempts, were sadly unsuccessful.

But in light of the tragic result, I have wondered quietly about what right I had to document such an event – even one that occurred directly in front of my office, and even though documenting events is my job.

In one sense, I don’t regret my presence that night, if only to recount here the lengths to which the firefighters went in a desperate attempt to save another life. Already that hour they had plucked two teens from a tree across the street in Bryan Park, after an ill-fated tubing trip, and they had saved another driver whose car stalled in the same spot as Richardson’s minutes earlier. All three surely would have faced great peril, if not certain death, otherwise.

In another sense, I have experienced strong feelings of guilt about my actions, or perhaps lack thereof, that night.

Most of all, I feel a terrible sadness for Richardson’s family, friends and coworkers. I’ve had difficulty reasoning the manner in which everything happened so quickly and resolutely that night – how a road I travel four times a day or more could suddenly become submerged under 10 feet of currents, yet clear enough three hours later for me to drive home. Why someone who was no different from the rest of us met a different fate.

Seeking answers where none exist is not easy, now or ever. During the past few weeks, I’ve listened to advice and thoughts from friends and colleagues who are journalists and others who are not. In questioning myself repeatedly, I’ve contemplated the many things I could have done that night instead of what I did.

I wonder if I could have helped more and observed less. I wonder whether I should even have been there, clicking a camera in a thunderous downpour, at all.

The roll of film I took that night now sits undeveloped on my desk. I haven’t the desire, nor the courage, to move it. Whatever images I captured inside it already exist in much greater detail inside my mind, and that is where they should remain.

When the water from Youngs Pond began rushing across Lakeside Avenue early that evening, before any lives had been threatened by its steady rise, our managing editor rushed up the stairs to my office, her feet soaked, to tell me about the surreal sight of a river flowing 50 feet from our front door.

“You have to come see this,” she said. “You’ll never see anything like it again.”

I hope she was right.

And I wish I never had.
Community

Local couple wins wedding at Lewis Ginter


Richmonders Jim Morgan and Dan Stackhouse were married at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden in Lakeside Mar. 7 month after winning the Say I Do! With OutRVA wedding contest in February. The contest was open to LGBT couples in recognition of Virginia’s marriage equality law, which took effect last fall. The wedding included a package valued at $25,000.

Morgan and Stackhouse, who became engaged last fall on the day marriage equality became the law in Virginia, have been together for 16 years. They were selected from among 40 couples who registered for the contest. The winners were announced at the Say I Do! Dessert Soiree at the Renaissance in Richmond in February. > Read more.

Fourth-annual Healy Gala planned


The Fourth Annual Healy Gala will be held Saturday, Apr. 11, at The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

The event was created to honor Michael Healy, a local businessman and community leader who died suddenly in June 2011, and to endow the Mike Healy Scholarship (through the Glen Allen Ruritan Club), which benefits students of Glen Allen High School.

Healy served as the chairman of Glen Allen Day for several years and helped raise thousands of dollars for local charities and organizations. > Read more.

Ruritan Club holding Brunswick stew sale


The Richmond Battlefield Ruritan Club is holding a Brunswick stew sale, with orders accepted through March 13 and pick-up available March 14. The cost is $8 per quart.

Pick-up will be at noon, March 14, at the Richmond Heights Civic Center, 7440 Wilton Road in Varina.

To place an order, call Mike at (804) 795- 7327 or Jim at (804) 795-9116. > Read more.

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Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


Two events this weekend benefit man’s best friend – a rabies clinic, sponsored by the Glendale Ruritan Club, and an American Red Cross Canine First Aid & CPR workshop at Alpha Dog Club. The fifth annual Shelby Rocks “Cancer is a Drag” Womanless Pageant will benefit the American Cancer Society and a spaghetti luncheon on Sunday will benefit the Eastern Henrico Ruritan Club. Twin Hickory Library will also host a used book sale this weekend with proceeds benefiting The Friends of the Twin Hickory Library. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

A taste of Japan

Ichiban offers rich Asian flavors, but portions lack

In a spot that could be easily overlooked is a surprising, and delicious, Japanese restaurant. In a tiny nook in the shops at the corner of Ridgefield Parkway and Pump Road sits a welcoming, warm and comfortable Asian restaurant called Ichiban, which means “the best.”

The restaurant, tucked between a couple others in the Gleneagles Shopping Center, was so quiet and dark that it was difficult to tell if it was open at 6:30 p.m. on a Monday. When I opened the door, I smiled when I looked inside. > Read more.

One beauty of a charmer

Disney’s no-frills, live-action ‘Cinderella’ delights

Cinderella is the latest from Disney’s new moviemaking battle plan: producing live-action adaptations of all their older classics. Which is a plan that’s had questionable results in the past.

Alice in Wonderland bloated with more Tim Burton goth-pop than the inside of a Hot Topic. Maleficent was a step in the right direction, but the movie couldn’t decide if Maleficent should be a hero or a villain (even if she should obviously be a villain) and muddled itself into mediocrity.

Cinderella is much better. Primarily, because it’s just Cinderella. No radical rebooting. No Tim Burton dreck. It’s the 1950 Disney masterpiece, transposed into live action and left almost entirely untouched. > Read more.

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