Henrico County VA

Seeking answers for a senseless tragedy

On Aug. 30, while a woman I didn’t know was struggling for her life, I stood 50 feet away in a biting downpour, peering through a soaked camera lens, and took pictures.

I am still trying to understand how I should feel about that.

Her name was Betty Ann Richardson. Like most of us that evening, she was merely trying to drive home through the sudden chaos caused by Tropical Storm Gaston. But unlike the rest of us, she never made it.

Journalists are curious and wide-eyed by nature.

Sometimes, we wish we were not.

We enter this profession because we like to write, take pictures, educate others and tell stories untold. Some of us thrive under the never-ending rush of constant deadlines, others under the adrenaline of danger, intrigue and shock. Others prefer the friendlier pace of covering youth baseball games, county government and autumn parades.

I believe each form of journalism, when performed responsibly, is equally important.

As the Henrico Citizen celebrates its third anniversary this month, I am able to reflect on the events that have caused each form to find its way into our pages during the past three years.

Our first issue was published nine days after the Sept. 11 attacks, at a time when much seemed lost in a surreal haze and confusion. Writing about the opening of a new county library and volunteers who built homes for the poor didn’t seem terribly important at the time, but we did it anyway. Today, I am glad we did.

The following autumn, a similar eerie feeling swept through the community while police sought desperately to catch snipers who were terrorizing our region. One October morning, I found myself standing across the street from what would temporarily become the most famous gas station in the world – in the heart of Henrico – after police narrowly missed capturing the suspects at a pay phone there.

And last year at this time, we all experienced the devastation of Hurricane Isabel – which has left lingering effects for some even now.

These are not the events we hoped to cover when the Citizen began publishing three years ago. But in journalism, we don’t always have a choice.

Sometimes, quietly important community news swirls together in sudden and unforeseen ways with a national manhunt or a natural disaster. I’d like to say that experience eventually dictates how we react to these strange combinations – as humans and as journalists.

But after Tropical Storm Gaston left me with a memory I won’t soon shake, I don’t know that I’m any closer to being comfortable with my reactions as either one.

While Gaston was dumping more than a foot of rain on metro Richmond, my staff and I were toiling away on a deadline in our office, which sits directly across from Bryan Park in Lakeside. I thought little of the rain – other than to marvel at how much of it there seemed to be – until our intern phoned on her way home to warn us that standing water on Lakeside Avenue was blocking the flow of traffic at about 5:30 p.m.

Later, when our managing editor and I ventured out in the downpour after flooding knocked our power out, we saw a frightening sight: Richardson’s van, caught in the rising water, had stalled on Lakeside Avenue and was sitting on a sidewalk, angled nearly perpendicular to the road. It sat only about 50 feet from our office building.

As several Henrico firefighters closed the area to onlookers, others anchored a ladder truck in place with sturdy reinforcement legs. I rushed to my car to load a roll of film into my camera.

At the time, I believed I would be capturing a dramatic rescue on film. It would be the sort of moment that could provide inspiration to readers and show the lengths to which rescuers will go to protect the public. From such a devastating storm, I thought, it would be comforting to steal something positive and reassuring.

Rain slapped against my face one sheet at a time while I snapped pictures through a lens blurry with streaks of water.

In between shots, I watched a team of firefighters brave rapids that in some spots must have been 8 to 10 feet deep. They extended their truck’s ladder parallel over the raging waters and climbed its length in an attempt to secure the van and pull it from danger. Several entered the rushing water when it became clear they couldn’t reach Richardson otherwise.

One was set to plow through the rapids in a final attempt to pull her from the van when the water overcame the vehicle and pulled it over the embankment and into Jordan’s Branch below. It also took Richardson’s life.

The first rule of covering an emergency is to be a human being first and a journalist second. Carrying a notepad or camera doesn’t give someone the right to opt out of his responsibilities to a fellow human in need.

At the time, and I suppose in retrospect, I know there was nothing I could have done to save Betty Ann Richardson. She became Henrico’s only fatality in the terrible storm. Even the Henrico firefighters who tried desperately – valiantly – to do so, and who went far beyond reasonable expectations in their attempts, were sadly unsuccessful.

But in light of the tragic result, I have wondered quietly about what right I had to document such an event – even one that occurred directly in front of my office, and even though documenting events is my job.

In one sense, I don’t regret my presence that night, if only to recount here the lengths to which the firefighters went in a desperate attempt to save another life. Already that hour they had plucked two teens from a tree across the street in Bryan Park, after an ill-fated tubing trip, and they had saved another driver whose car stalled in the same spot as Richardson’s minutes earlier. All three surely would have faced great peril, if not certain death, otherwise.

In another sense, I have experienced strong feelings of guilt about my actions, or perhaps lack thereof, that night.

Most of all, I feel a terrible sadness for Richardson’s family, friends and coworkers. I’ve had difficulty reasoning the manner in which everything happened so quickly and resolutely that night – how a road I travel four times a day or more could suddenly become submerged under 10 feet of currents, yet clear enough three hours later for me to drive home. Why someone who was no different from the rest of us met a different fate.

Seeking answers where none exist is not easy, now or ever. During the past few weeks, I’ve listened to advice and thoughts from friends and colleagues who are journalists and others who are not. In questioning myself repeatedly, I’ve contemplated the many things I could have done that night instead of what I did.

I wonder if I could have helped more and observed less. I wonder whether I should even have been there, clicking a camera in a thunderous downpour, at all.

The roll of film I took that night now sits undeveloped on my desk. I haven’t the desire, nor the courage, to move it. Whatever images I captured inside it already exist in much greater detail inside my mind, and that is where they should remain.

When the water from Youngs Pond began rushing across Lakeside Avenue early that evening, before any lives had been threatened by its steady rise, our managing editor rushed up the stairs to my office, her feet soaked, to tell me about the surreal sight of a river flowing 50 feet from our front door.

“You have to come see this,” she said. “You’ll never see anything like it again.”

I hope she was right.

And I wish I never had.
Community

MADD to host candlelight vigil Dec. 2 at UR

Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) will host a candlelight vigil of remembrance and hope Tuesday, Dec. 2 at 7 p.m. at the University of Richmond, outside the Cannon Chapel. The public is invited to attend and join MADD to honor victims of impaired driving crashes, while helping to remind the community to be safe during the holidays. > Read more.

Tournament supports adoption efforts

Among participants at the Seventh Annual Coordinators2Inc Golf Tournament and awards luncheon Oct. 3 were (from left) Rebecca Ricardo, C2 Inc executive director; Kevin Derr, member of the winning foursome; Sharon Richardson, C2 Inc founder; and Frank Ridgway and Jon King, members of the winning foursome.

Held at The Crossings Golf Club, the tournament will benefit placement of children from Virginia's foster care system into permanent families through Coordinators2. > Read more.

A.C. Moore to host winter craft day for kids

Event will help kick of Marine Corps' 'Toys for Tots' campaign
All 140 A.C. Moore locations will serve as drop-off centers this year for the Marine Toys for Tots Foundation, and all toys collected will stay in the local communities served by the stores in which they are donated.

On Saturday, Nov. 15, the Willow Lawn location will kick off the month-long program by hosting a "Make & Take" craft event for kids. Children ages six and older will be able to make a craft and take it home with them. Representatives from the Marines will be in-store to teach customers about the Toys for Tots program. A.C. Moore team members will be on site to help with the crafts. > Read more.

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Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


The Dominion GardenFest of Lights Grand Illumination takes place tonight at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden! This year’s theme is “A Legacy in Lights: 120 Years from Bicycle Club to Botanical Garden,” which celebrates the Garden’s history. You can also celebrate Thanksgiving again – tomorrow at Henricus Historical Park. More great events – Lavender Fields Herb Farm and Wilton House Museum will both host their holiday open house events this weekend. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

A hero is born

Disney’s ‘Big Hero 6,’ lovable robot Baymax delight
It may be time for Olaf to step down as our nation’s reigning cartoon character. Big Hero 6, the latest animated feature from Disney, contains a challenger to the throne: Baymax (Scott Adsit), another lovably chubby white wonder, who will bring joy to children’s hearts and invade every home in America inside a six-foot pile of Disney merchandise.

Big Hero 6 (based ever so slightly on a Marvel comic of the same name) is the story of Baymax – and also his closest companion Hiro Hamada (Ryan Potter). And then also their four friends, all of whom join together to form the titular superhero team.

At first, though, it’s only Hiro, a young boy and an engineering prodigy, who’d rather spend his time in underground robot fight clubs than do something productive with his gifts. > Read more.

Authentically Italian

Bella’s feels – and tastes – like Italy should
Short Pump is known for its share of chain restaurants and strip malls, but diners looking for something more distinct can certainly find it without heading downtown or to nearby Charlottesville.

In fact, local husband-and-wife restaurateurs Valeria Bisenti and Doug Muir brought a taste of Charlottesville (and Italy) to Short Pump when they took a chance and opened Bella’s second location in the same shopping strip as Wal-Mart and Peter Chang China Cafe. (Bella’s original location is on Main Street in downtown Charlottesville.)

For a local Italian restaurant, Bella’s is as “Mom and Pop” as its gets. Valeria is Mom, and Doug is Pop. Since its opening about six months ago, diners have been eating rich comfort foods and drinking Italian wines. > Read more.

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The Children's Museum of Richmond will host a Kindergarten Readiness Forum on Tuesday, Dec. 2 from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at CMoR Short Pump, 2200 Old Brick Rd. in… Full text

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