Henrico County VA
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A significant year fades into history

Tom Lappas, Citizen Publisher
This issue, our final of Henrico County's 400th anniversary year (and this newspaper's 10th year), also concludes our yearlong series profiling the most significant moments in Henrico's illustrious history.

Were you surprised by some of the events on our list? Did you learn about some that were unfamiliar to you? We hope so. Did you disagree with some and agree with others? That's ok, too. This endeavor was designed not only to celebrate the county's past turning points and momentous occasions but also to generate discussion among readers and members of the community about the county, its past and how these events and others have shaped our future.

It's been said that to know your future, you must know your past. We hope that this series has helped foster a great knowledge of Henrico's history among its ever-growing citizenry. Many of us who live here now are relative newcomers to the county (a title, of course, that applies to anyone who hasn't been here at least three or four decades). We may not realize all that happened here before we arrived, and in this county, it's an exhaustive list of events.

Our list was composed somewhat equally of singular events that on their own merits were noteworthy at the time they occurred and others whose true significance didn't become clear until years – or decades – later. Of course, paring 400 years of history in one of the most historic places in the United States down to just 24 is an impossible task. Our list, though diverse, certainly is not an authoritative one.

Though some of the county's successes have resulted from good fortune or circumstance over which its government and citizens had little or no control (the construction of Interstate 64 through the county – No. 9 on our list – for example), many must be attributed to events and actions over which they did have control; among them, the establishment of the county manager form of government (No. 5), the rejection of a merger with the City of Richmond (No. 4), Henrico's decision to take control of its own road system (No. 8) and the county's triple AAA bond rating (No. 19).

Those events arguably have done more to shape present-day Henrico than any others because they laid the foundation from which a budding community could flourish in a unique way.

But in compiling – and ranking – the events that comprise this list, our self-imposed charge was to identify those that have had the greatest impact on the county both at the time during which they occurred and in the years since. In that sense, it would have been difficult to choose anything other than the establishment of the Citie of Henricus or the success of John Rolfe in cultivating his unique variety of tobacco at Varina Farms.

Certainly without the former, the latter could not have occurred. But it's easy to argue that if not for Rolfe's success, Henricus – and indeed the Virginia Colony itself – may have died a swift death.

How much longer would England have continued to fund exploration to the New World without finding a profitable reason to do so? Jamestown's flame had nearly been extinguished only a few years after its settlement, and Henricus likely wouldn't have lasted much longer itself without a reason for investment. Rolfe's tobacco provided that reason – in grand fashion.

It not only saved the Virginia Colony, the Jamestown settlement and validated English exploration to the New World, it also set the stage for the birth of a nation. And it happened here, in Henrico County.

"After four failed attempts, Rolfe's pioneer commercial venture reversed the fate of the colonists' effort to settle on American soil from failure to success," author Billy Yeargin concluded in a book about the history of tobacco in the Mid Atlantic.

Yet, 400 years later, Rolfe's role remains arguably the best kept secret – or greatest historical oversight – in the story of present-day America. Every American school child learns about Jamestown and Plymouth Rock. Few – if any – outside of this state have ever heard of Henricus, nor do they understand the importance of what happened there and on Varina Farms. Indeed, revisionist history seems alive and well in the case of John Rolfe and Varina Farms; many documentations of his tobacco growth attribute it to Jamestown, not to his Henrico home where it actually first occurred.

The farm where Rolfe lived with his wife, Pocahontas, still produces crops today in Varina, virtually unchanged in the 400 years since he unknowingly altered the history of a county, a colony, a European nation and an unborn nation in the New World.

The events and moments profiled in these pages throughout this historic year help tell the story of the most historic locality in the United States, but they are only part of that story. Each event helped set the stage for others that followed – a mixture of good fortune, calculated risk and carefully laid plans by men and women who sensed the proper moments in which to seize opportunity.

Today, Henrico is known as a desirable place to live and work – a strong, economically sound and progressive locality with a conservative, well-reasoned approach to government, a vibrant and creative workforce, a powerful network of small businesses, an exceptional educational system and a variety of opportunities for those who call it home. In many ways, then, Rolfe's ingenuity four centuries ago seems incredibly befitting of the county it helped create.

Rolfe was able to combine events over which he had little control (landing in Bermuda on his way to the New World, where he likely gathered tobacco seeds) with those he could control through ability and education (cultivating various seeds here to produce his successful strain); and to combine fortune (falling in love with Pocahontas, the daughter of a powerful Native American chief) with calculated risk and logic (seeking, and winning, her hand in marriage and helping to unite, if briefly, natives and newcomers); and to lay the foundation for future generations on the land he made
valuable.

It is with these thoughts in mind that we mark the conclusion of Henrico's first 400 years. What does the future hold here? We need only look to our past for inspiration.

If you missed any of the articles in our series, or if you'd just like to refresh your memory anytime,
we've archived the entire series of 24 articles here.


Community

Varina Ruritans honor students

The Varina Ruritan Club hosted the winners of its 2014 Environmental Essay contest at its monthly meeting March 11 in Varina.

The contest, in its eighth year, was for the first time open to students in grades 3-5 at Varina Elementary School. (It previously was open to Sandston Elementary School students.)

The meeting included the winners, parents of the winners, Varina Elementary principal Mark Tyler and several teachers who were in charge of the contest at the school. > Read more.

Baseball game to benefit Glen Allen Buddy Ball


For the fifth consecutive year, St. Christopher’s and Benedictine will play a varsity baseball game at Glen Allen's RF&P Park as part of a fundraising effort for the River City Buddy Ball program.

The game will take place Saturday, April 12, at 7 p.m., and the teams hope to raise $3,000 through donations, raffles and other efforts. Admission to the game is free, but fans who attend are asked to donate funds for the Glen Allen Youth Athletic Association's Buddy Ball program, which enables disabled children and teens to play baseball. > Read more.

Highland Springs field to be dedicated in honor of longtime coach Spears

The Henrico Division of Recreation and Parks will dedicate the Highland Springs Little League Majors Field in memory and honor of Rev. Robert “Bob” L. Spears, Jr., on April 12 with a ceremony at the field at 8 a.m.

Spears served the league as a coach and volunteer for 30 years and was praised as a pioneer for equality. His “Finish strong” motto embodied ethical perseverance on the field and in life. > Read more.

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Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


Do the Bunny Hop over to Meadow Farm on Saturday for an introduction to all the farm animals there! An introduction to “Global Sounds” – featuring Japanese, Indonesian, West African, Indian, and Brazilian music and dance performances – can be found at the University of Richmond. The University of Richmond will also host the annual Spider spring game, as well as the inaugural Spiders Easter Egg Hunt. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

Restaurant watch

Find out how your favorite dining establishments fared during their most recent inspections by the Virginia Department of Health. > Read more.

A fun, fuzzy ride

‘Muppets Most Wanted’ worthy of its franchise

Do Muppets sleep? It’s hard to say.

They don’t really eat (or breathe, as far as anyone can tell). And only occasionally do they have visible, functioning legs.

As far as anyone knows, sleeping might be off the table. And that makes it very hard to accuse the Muppets of sleepwalking through their latest feature, Muppets Most Wanted – even if that’s exactly what’s going on.

Jim Henson’s beloved creations were back in a big way after 2011’s The Muppets, with fame and fortune and even an Oscar, a first for the group (“Rainbow Connection” was nominated, yet somehow failed to collect at the ’79 ceremony). > Read more.

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