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A family’s musical education

My husband and I enjoy live concerts, which for us usually entails a trip downtown to the National. We most recently went to see a critically acclaimed French electronic band called M83. I’d heard a few of their songs before, but I wasn’t sure what to expect of a live show. Lots of freaky lights, I guessed, and people a lot younger than us.

I was right on both counts. Even in the disco-ball darkness, I could tell that we were surrounded by a generation of people closer in age to our 12-year-old son than to us. I doubted some were even able to present a legal ID at the door. And the closer it got to show time, the more the youngsters invaded my personal body space. When the show started, I could hardly concentrate on the music because I was getting elbowed in the ribs by M83’s seemingly biggest fan.

My outrage brought on a realization of my advanced age and a resultant questioning of my presence at such a concert. Perhaps I would have been better off going to see the Richmond Symphony, I told myself. I could sit in a comfortable chair and be confident of the irreproachability of my body space’s boundaries.

Growing up in the shipyard city of Newport News, I never went to a live concert, unless you count “Annie the Musical.” (I still have my t-shirt.) My high school years were spent over-listening to the likes of George Michael, Janet Jackson, and the dynamic duo Milli Vanilli. I was mired in Top-40 stickiness when I went off to college, where I couldn’t walk down my dormitory hallway without hearing a different genre of music coming from each and every room.

And thus began my education – some might say the most important education of all.

While at college, I also had the good fortune of living so close to Charlottesville’s Trax, where the Dave Matthews Band played its hearts out every Tuesday night in the early 1990s. There, in that smoky and beer-spilled room, I learned to appreciate the sweaty tangibility of a live show.

I could get up close to the stage and watch Boyd Tinsley’s bare arm muscles force soaring melodies from his violin. I could watch the sweat drip off Dave Matthew’s chin. I could watch the arc of Carter Beauford’s drumsticks in order to anticipate the next song. I could sing and dance along with the crowd when they struck up “Lie in our Graves” and “Ants Marching.” I could trip, and be tripped; it was all part of the fun.

Through the ensuing years, I became a bit of a music snob, eschewing pop music as meaningless filler. If I so much as heard a beat-box, I switched the station as if my ears had been burned with a curling iron.

And no surprise, my oldest children, ages 12 and 9, like Top-40 pop music pretty much exclusively. It’s quite strange, but I’ve found myself enjoying some of it too, especially in the afternoons when I need a coffee but I’m stuck in the car chauffeuring my children to and fro.

Most of the songs scream of youth and insist on living in the moment (albeit at times inappropriately), but I believe that’s something we all could try to do a little more often.

Through my children’s eyes, I am now reliving and relearning pop culture. But I also want to teach them that there is more to music beyond the “40.”

Over their initial protestations, I do my best to play different kinds of music while we’re in the car. At home, we play what we like, and the kids inevitably start to dance and sing along. We take them to Richmond Symphony concerts, folk festivals, Landmark Theater musicals, local music events. We show them concerts on TV. And much to their chagrin, we insist on piano lessons.

When they are a little older, my husband and I want to take them to rock concerts with us. We might embarrass them, with our aging faces, comfortable shoes, and insistence on respecting personal body space. But I firmly believe that enjoying music with one another –whether it’s Taylor Swift or M83 – is one of the best things parents and children can do together, at all ages and stages of life.

Diann Ducharme is the author of The Outer Banks House the recently released e-book, Chasing Eternity, and is a wife, mother of three children and owner of one border collie. You can find her at http://www.diannducharme.com where, she blogs about the writing life.
Community

Author, child abuse survivor to speak at Henrico event

To help celebrate twenty years of service to advocating for abused and neglected children in Henrico County, Henrico Court Appointed Special Advocates, Inc. (CASA) will host an evening with bestselling author K.L. Randis on Tuesday, Aug. 26, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Belmont Recreation Center in Lakeside.

Randis is best known for her bestselling novel, Spilled Milk, which tells her painful – but ultimately triumphant – personal story of abuse and of child abuse prevention. The book is her first novel.

The event is free to the public, but seating is limited Reservations may be made by e-mailing .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Belmon Recreation Center is located at 1600 Hilliard Road. > Read more.

Philippines ambassador to the US visits Filipino Festival in Henrico


The Ambassador of the Philippines to the United States Jose L. Cuisia, Jr. attended the Ninth Annual Filipino Festival at Our Lady of Lourdes Church earlier this month. Cuisia (pictured above with festival performers) was welcomed by County Manager John Vithoulkas and Brookland District Supervisor Dick Glover (below) at the church, which is located in Lakeside.

While enjoying some of the cultural performances at the festival, the ambassador and his wife had a private lunch with Vithoulkas, Glover, Eldon Burton (an outreach representative from U.S. Senator Mark R. Warner’s Office) and Father James Begley, the pastor of OLL. > Read more.

Dragon boats invade the James

Hundreds of spectators filled the banks of the James River to watch two dozen teams of competitors in the Walgreen’s Richmond International Dragon Boat Festival at Rocketts Landing Aug. 2. The event included a number of races, as well as several cultural performances. The sport is billed as the fastest growing water sport in the world.(Photo by Roger Walk for the Henrico Citizen) > Read more.

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Entertainment

‘Planes’ sequel crashes

‘Fire and Rescue’ proves too predictable, boring

Planes: Fire and Rescue opens with a dedication to the hero firefighters of the world. It’s an admirable notion, and it makes sense, given that this is a film about planes that fight fires.

But here it might be a little out of place, as Planes: Fire and Rescue has a few things on its mind besides supporting the men and women who routinely throw themselves into burning buildings.

Like money. Lots and lots of money – into the 11-figures-and-counting range. In case you weren’t aware, 2006’s Cars was the biggest moneymaker Disney had in decades – not because of how much green the film printed at the box office, but because a combination of toys, games and snack foods stamped with the Cars seal of approval routinely pulls in tens of billions of dollars per year. > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


This weekend in Henrico, you can learn about fall herbs or mad science. Enjoy some laughs from West End Comedy or Three-Penny Theatre’s production of “The Rivah Home Companion.” For music lovers, Jennifer Nettles is in concert tonight and the fifth annual GWAR-B-Q takes place tomorrow at Hadad’s Lake. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

Restaurant watch

Find out how your favorite dining establishments fared during their most recent inspections by the Virginia Department of Health. > Read more.

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VCU Medical Center will present the seminar “You Don’t Have to Live with Foot Discomfort” at 5:30 p.m. at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, 1800 Lakeside Ave. Learn ways to take… Full text

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