Henrico County VA
Health

Patient First again accepting Anthem patients


Four months after a dispute caused Patient First to stop accepting Anthem health insurance patients in Virginia, the two sides have reached an agreement that will allow Anthem patients to return.

Patient First, Virginia’s largest provider of primary and urgent health care, had stopped accepting Anthem patients Feb. 2, citing Anthem's reduction in reimbursement rates as the reason. At the time, Anthem officials said that they were paying the same reimbursement rates to Patient First as to other Virginia heath-care providers. But Patient First officials contended that Anthem had reduced its reimbursements back to 2012 levels.

Good for the heart


In recognition of February as American Heart Month, all newborn babies at Bon Secours St. Mary's Hospital were dressed in hand-knitted red caps, provided by the American Heart Association, one day earlier this month. The AHA is seeking to increase awareness about heart disease in women specifically and general heart health for men and women.

Open enrollment for health insurance marketplace ends Jan. 31

Approximately six million people have signed up for the health insurance marketplace in the states that use healthcare.gov during the open enrollment period, which ends Jan. 31.

The marketplace also saw 2.4 million new consumers sign up for coverage; in Virginia nearly 376,000 had signed up as of Dec. 19.

Bon Secours seeks health input from local residents


Bon Secours Richmond Health System is seeking respondents for a community health needs survey of residents within the areas of its hospitals (Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital, Bon Secours Memorial Regional Medical Center, Bon Secours Richmond Community Hospital, and Bon Secours St. Francis Medical Center).

The survey will help Bon Secours identify the areas of greatest need in the metro Richmond community where the not-for-profit health system might improve the health of the community.

Barbados girls treated at St. Mary’s


World Pediatric Project (WPP), in cooperation with The Queen Elizabeth Hospital Barbados and the government of Barbados, welcomed two young girls to Henrico earlier this month for advanced medical treatments performed by Bon Secours Richmond Health System pediatric orthopaedic surgeon Chester Sharps at St. Mary’s Hospital.

Seven-year-olds Miracle and Raven (pictured) both suffer from Blount’s disease, a growth disorder of the shinbone (tibia) in which the legs angle inward, causing a bowed appearance below the knees. The reason for the shinbone’s failure to develop is unknown.

Project SEARCH graduates receive diplomas


Bon Secours Virginia Health System recently recognized and awarded diplomas to 25 Virginia high school seniors with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and/or intellectual disabilities for their completion of Project SEARCH, a nine-month national school-to-work program, at four Bon Secours facilities in Central Virginia and in Portsmouth. Project SEARCH provides hands-on training to students with disabilities through internships at health care facilities and other businesses, with a goal of gaining employment upon completion. Bon Secours Virginia is the only Project SEARCH program also participating in clinical research.

The Project SEARCH program began at St. Mary's Hospital in Henrico and has since expanded to three other sites.

Stroke, aneurysm support group launches


Bon Secours Richmond Health System recently launched the Richmond Brain Aneurysm, Stroke and AVM Support Group to help survivors of the afflictions. The Support Group meets on the second Tuesday of each month from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Evelyn D. Reinhart Guest House, a guest house run by Bon Secours located at 1100 Libbie Ave. At a recent meeting, Dr. Salmaan Khawaja, a neurocognitive psychologist (seated, at far right), spoke with the attendees about issues related to short-term memory loss that they might be dealing with.

Survivors are not required to have been treated at a Bon Secours hospital.

Sheltering Arms to open new outpatient therapy center in West End


On April 20, Sheltering Arms will welcome patients to its newest outpatient rehabilitation center. Located in the Reynolds Crossing complex in Henrico, this will be Sheltering Arms’ largest outpatient facility, primarily serving the rehabilitation needs of patients with orthopedic conditions which may include sports injuries, arthritis, joint injuries, and back pain. The center will also provide services for women’s health issues, such as urinary incontinence.

Programs at the 18,500 square-foot facility will include physical therapy, rehabilitation physician services, medical psychology and a specialized industrial rehabilitation program focused on helping injured workers return to the job safely and effectively.

A suburban epidemic


Marvelle Hutchinson had been in prison for 5 years. Locked up for heroin possession, he was awaiting release in 2012 when he began hearing strange stories about the girls back home. New inmates were telling him about shifting attitudes towards the drug that had tormented him since he first tried it at age 19.

“It used to be that you could not let no females know you was getting high [on heroin] because that was hard drugs,” said Hutchinson. “You would be considered a junkie.”

But newly incarcerated inmates were telling Hutchinson that the drug had become commonplace. He couldn’t imagine a world in which snorting or shooting heroin was as casual as smoking a cigarette.

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