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What are the odds?

Bills target online gambling operations
Is it an online gambling operation or a cyber-café?

That’s the question surrounding the Internet Shoppees in Amelia Bottom and the Village Square Shopping Center. Law enforcement officials have raided similar businesses in Roanoke, Virginia Beach, Pittsylvania County and Farmville, and state legislators are considering whether to explicitly outlaw such operations.

In October, Amelia’s first Internet Shoppee opened in Amelia Bottom. The proprietor, Raj Patel, took out an ad in The Amelia Monitor (Oct. 21) that said, “$1000 Cash Give Away – Sweepstakes – Play ‘Pot O Gold’!” Under the word “sweepstakes” was a graphic reminiscent of a triple-seven winning slot machine display.

However, the Internet Shoppee room itself contains no scantily-clad cocktail waitresses, no liquor of any kind, and no one-armed bandits – just a lot of computers. The ad said customers could “Mingle, Relax, Copy, Print, Fax”; a box contained a “coupon” for “$10 Internet Time 1000 points on us!!” The establishment was described in the ad and on its sign as “a Business Center.”

This month, another outlet, also called the Internet Shoppee (Patel’s spelling), opened in the Village Square Shopping Center. At the invitation of a store employee who requested anonymity, a Monitor reporter visited the business to see what it was all about.

So which is it? Gambling? Or an Internet café?

It’s still not clear, and the business’ mode of operation seems deliberately designed to encourage ambiguity.

This reporter paid $5; presented her driver’s license (no one under 21 is permitted on the premises); then logged in as instructed by the store employee. The $5 seems to have bought 600 points and 25 minutes of Internet time.

It took perhaps seven minutes to play a slot-machine-like “game” that used up all the points, during which time the amount of Internet time on the account did not seem to decrease. The “game” used up all the points but “paid” $9, which could either be used to buy more points or be redeemed for cash.

However, before a customer can play any game or access the Internet, the computer shows three screens of disclaimers and rules. The gist seems to be:

By buying “points,” the customer is actually entering a sweepstakes unconnected to the “games” onscreen.

No purchase is required to play the sweepstakes; anyone wanting to enter can write to a North Carolina address for a free entry.

Anyone can receive one free entry every 24 hours simply by requesting one at the shop.

The number of “games” you play does not affect your chances of winning the sweepstakes.

Customers do not have to play games; indeed, for as little as $1, they can access the Internet. This reporter clicked on the appropriate icon and got a Google screen. One customer in the shop was doing schoolwork on the Internet when this reporter visited, and the employee said other customers also came in to get high-speed Internet service.

Internet service “is one of the things you drop when you’re trying to save money, like cable,” the employee said. “This way, a person can come here and not have to spend a lot of money to get on the Internet.”

But is it legal?

Patel furnished The Monitor with copies of a July 30 letter from Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli to Del. Bill Janis (R-Glen Allen). Attorney General Cuccinelli found that no gambling was taking place at a similar business in July.

“It is my opinion that the element of consideration is missing, and therefore no illegal gambling occurs, when the opportunity to win a prize is offered both with a purchase and without the requirement of a purchase,” the attorney general’s letter stated.

Patel also gave The Monitor a copy of an Aug. 16 letter from C. Phillips Ferguson, the commonwealth’s attorney in Suffolk, to “Dear Sir or Madam.” Ferguson stated that he would “concur that Internet Café Sweepstakes Systems do not constitute illegal gambling under current state law.”

While such operations may be legal now, they might not be for long.

Seven bills before the General Assembly seem expressly aimed at the Internet café sweepstakes phenomenon. One of them – House Bill 2224 – is being sponsored by Del. Tommy Wright, who represents the 61st House District, which includes Amelia County. Attorney General Cuccinelli has announced his support for two pieces of legislation identical to Del. Wright’s bill.

“I was asked by some people in my district to introduce this legislation,” Del. Wright said. “Last year in the Shenandoah Valley, there was a problem, and we passed legislation with unintended consequences. This year we’re trying to amend the definitions to close the loophole.”

The Monitor contacted Patel earlier this month to arrange for the sort of “new business” story often seen on page 11 of the paper under the heading, “Our Neighbors.”

Patel responded that he and “the company” had done all of the marketing they intended to do. He asserted that the Internet Shoppee is a legal business and pointed to similar businesses in Blackstone, Farmville and Richmond.

* * *

Seven bills filed this session seemed aimed at Internet gambling operations. They are:
House Bill 1584, by Del. Glenn Oder (R-Newport News)
HB 1700, by Del. Clifford Athey (R-Front Royal)
HB 1863, by Del. John Cosgrove (R-Chesapeake)
HB 2119, by Del. Ronald Villanueva (R-Virginia Beach)
HB 2224, by Del. Tommy Wright (R-Victoria)
Senate Bill 1164, by Sen. W. Roscoe Reynolds (D-Martinsville)
SB 1195, by Sen. Mark Obenshain (R-Harrisonburg)
Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli has announced his support for HB 1700 and SB 1195. All of the bills currently are in committee.


Community

Varina Ruritans honor students

The Varina Ruritan Club hosted the winners of its 2014 Environmental Essay contest at its monthly meeting March 11 in Varina.

The contest, in its eighth year, was for the first time open to students in grades 3-5 at Varina Elementary School. (It previously was open to Sandston Elementary School students.)

The meeting included the winners, parents of the winners, Varina Elementary principal Mark Tyler and several teachers who were in charge of the contest at the school. > Read more.

Baseball game to benefit Glen Allen Buddy Ball


For the fifth consecutive year, St. Christopher’s and Benedictine will play a varsity baseball game at Glen Allen's RF&P Park as part of a fundraising effort for the River City Buddy Ball program.

The game will take place Saturday, April 12, at 7 p.m., and the teams hope to raise $3,000 through donations, raffles and other efforts. Admission to the game is free, but fans who attend are asked to donate funds for the Glen Allen Youth Athletic Association's Buddy Ball program, which enables disabled children and teens to play baseball. > Read more.

Highland Springs field to be dedicated in honor of longtime coach Spears

The Henrico Division of Recreation and Parks will dedicate the Highland Springs Little League Majors Field in memory and honor of Rev. Robert “Bob” L. Spears, Jr., on April 12 with a ceremony at the field at 8 a.m.

Spears served the league as a coach and volunteer for 30 years and was praised as a pioneer for equality. His “Finish strong” motto embodied ethical perseverance on the field and in life. > Read more.

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Entertainment

A fun, fuzzy ride

‘Muppets Most Wanted’ worthy of its franchise

Do Muppets sleep? It’s hard to say.

They don’t really eat (or breathe, as far as anyone can tell). And only occasionally do they have visible, functioning legs.

As far as anyone knows, sleeping might be off the table. And that makes it very hard to accuse the Muppets of sleepwalking through their latest feature, Muppets Most Wanted – even if that’s exactly what’s going on.

Jim Henson’s beloved creations were back in a big way after 2011’s The Muppets, with fame and fortune and even an Oscar, a first for the group (“Rainbow Connection” was nominated, yet somehow failed to collect at the ’79 ceremony). > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


There’s no excuse for kids and families to not get out of the house this weekend! The Armour House and Gardens has an “Egg-celent Egg-venture” planned and Reynolds Community College will host the Reynolds Family Palooza. If you’re looking to give back to your community, Dorey Park will host Walk Like MADD and coordinators2inc will present the annual Kids Walk for Kids. And a special event for children with special needs will be on Sunday – the Caring Bunny will be at Virginia Center Commons. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

A new meaning for fried chicken

Is it heresy to say – in this bastion-of-tradition capital of the Old South – that it's time for Southern fried chicken to take a step back and make way for a new fried chicken king?

Count me among the new believers bowing to Bonchon Chicken's delectable double-fried bliss. Hand-brushed with signature garlic soy or hot sauce, flash-fried once and then again, the decadent drums and wings take "crisp" to a new level. If you're eating with a crowd and everyone bites in at once, be warned: you might need ear plugs to handle the din. > Read more.

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