Volunteers enjoy giving back

Trey Harrison, a Varina High School senior, (center) volunteers at the mobile food pantry at Chimborazo Elementary School.
Gloria Nolan sent a text message on a recent Saturday morning canceling an interview appointment. A friend’s wife had died and she wanted to spend time with him instead.

What started as one of Nolan’s volunteer assignments for Hospice of Virginia had grown into a friendship.

Nolan’s primary duties as a hospice volunteer include making regular visits and helping relieve caregivers so that they can run errands or take a needed break. She has volunteered for about four years for the hospice.

“Some patients request that I read Scriptures, or just sit quietly and keep them company,” Nolan said. “Others enjoy having someone listen to them tell life stories or help with needlework. At times, I may simply keep the caregiver company while the patient rests. While not required by [Hospice of Virginia], I enjoy remembering special
days like birthdays and anniversaries.”

Nolan, a western Henrico resident, joins millions of Americans who volunteer each year. She was part of an upward trend in volunteerism among African-Americans last year despite the down economy, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

“I volunteer because I am a compassionate person by nature. Because I … have been so well blessed in my life,” she said. “I believe that being Christ’s disciple requires that I give back by serving others.”

Women age 35 to 54 volunteer more than any other group. However, plenty of younger men, women and a few children volunteered this month at the Chimborazo Family Mobile Food Pantry.

Trey Harrison, a Varina High School senior, stood in Richmond’s Chimborazo Elementary School parking lot between a large food pantry truck and a folding table as he packed items into brown paper bags. Harrison said his mother encouraged him to volunteer.

“I figured that it helps people and it gives me community service hours [to include on my college applications]. So it helps me out more,” Harrison said.

On the other side of the truck, Angelina Patrick, an eastern Henrico resident and Virginia Commonwealth University student, added bunches of bananas to bags. She then moved the bags to a nearby table for families to pick up later.

Patrick said she got involved with the food project through HandsOn Greater Richmond, a local group that connects people with organizations who need volunteers. Patrick said a school friend told her about the group and how easy it was to go online to sign up to volunteer.

The mobile pantry is organized by Richmond’s Communities in Schools (CIS) with funding from Feed More Impact 100. The pantry has provided food to hundreds of children and their families since starting in September 2011.

The pantry is held the same night as the school’s PTA meeting. While parents and teachers are meeting, volunteers sort and pack produce, dry goods, and sometimes fresh meat, according to Caitlin Roberts, CIS site coordinator. After the PTA meeting, families pick up their groceries and head home.

The pantry and dozens of other community groups rely on HandsOn to help link them with needed volunteers. Opportunities are listed on the HandsOn website with new ones added as the need arises.

Others like Nolan find their own volunteer opportunities. However the connection is made, Nolan said volunteering is all about focusing on other people and their needs.

“The volunteer experience is always about the other person not one’s self. Putting self aside and cheerfully serving others is the only way to have a rewarding volunteer experience,” she said.

This story is part of the series Virginia Tapestry: Reflecting Our Rich Diversity. It was produced by In Your Shoes Media.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Crime Stoppers’ Crime of the Week: May 22, 2017

This week, Crime Stoppers needs your help to find the suspects vandalizing Dominion Energy equipment in Varina.

On Feb. 6 and May 3, someone shot at equipment belonging to Dominion Energy. Both incidents occurred near Kingsland Road between the hours of midnight and 3 a.m. The equipment was damaged, causing a major inconvenience to customers who lost power and posing a safety hazard to people nearby. > Read more.

A place to excel

It's no surprise when a business deal begins to take shape during a golf outing.

Perhaps less common is the business deal that percolates during a youth football practice. But such was the case for Varina District Supervisor Tyrone Nelson.

During a visit to former Varina High School football star Michael Robinson's football camp, Nelson was discussing with Robinson his excitement for the new Varina Library, whose opening last June was at that time forthcoming.
> Read more.

Business in brief


Long & Foster Real Estate recently named Amy Enoch as the new manager of its Tuckahoe office. Enoch brings more than 15 years of real estate expertise to her new position, and she most recently led Long & Foster’s Village of Midlothian office. Enoch has served in both sales and management positions during her tenure at Long & Foster. Prior to her real estate career, Enoch worked in information technology and hospitality. She is a graduate of Radford University, where she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in economics, English and history. Enoch has also received the designation of Graduate, Realtor Institute (GRI) from the National Association of Realtors, and this showcases her expertise in the fundamentals of real estate. > Read more.

Henrico recognized as a 2017 ‘Playful City USA’ community


A national nonprofit organization, KaBOOM!, has selected Henrico County as a 2017 Playful City USA community. The organization encourages communities to bring fun and balanced activities to children every day.

Henrico's selection is joined by the city of Richmond, town of Ashland, as well as the counties of Charles City, Chesterfield, Goochland, Hanover, New Kent and Powhatan. All of the localities make up the first region completely recognized through Playful City USA. > Read more.

Gallagher Foundation serves more than 14,000 teens in first year


In its first year, The Cameron K. Gallagher Foundation reached 14,000 teens through its programs from Spring 2016 to date. The foundation is dedicated to spreading positivity and erasing stigmas by educating and creating awareness on depression, anxiety and stress among teens. CKG delivers programs at schools, community events and its West End office.

“Students are in need of the information in the workshops, whether they know it or not, and they aren’t getting it anywhere else,” said Beth Curry, Director of Health and Wellness at The Steward School. > Read more.

Henrico Business Bulletin Board

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The Modlin Center for the Arts at the University of Richmond will screen NT Live’s broadcast of “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead” at 7 p.m. in Camp Concert Hall, Booker Hall of Music. Daniel Radcliffe (Harry Potter, The Woman in Black), Joshua McGuire (The Hour) and David Haig (Four Weddings and a Funeral, The Witness for the Prosecution) star in Tom Stoppard’s brilliantly funny situation comedy, broadcast live from The Old Vic theatre in London. NT Live brings the best of British theatre direct from the stages of London to movie theatres around the world. Tickets are $7 to $14. For details, call 289-8980 or visit http://www.modlin.richmond.edu. Full text

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