Virginia Indian Cultural Program to showcase past, present

When English settlers landed in Jamestown in 1607, many believed that Virginia Indians were primitive and savage. Aside from the story of Pocahontas, Indian life was overlooked when history books were written.

But the Indian tribes had rich and robust cultures refined over generations, brimming with arts and traditions including dancing, singing and crafts.

Though they weren’t always appreciated by white settlers, these arts continued to evolve.

“So many times, people expect our culture to be exactly like it was 400 years ago,” said Wayne Adkins, assistant chief of the Chickahominy Indian Tribe.

“Yes, people are doing traditional things like leatherwork, beadwork and pottery, but we have younger artists working in other materials.”

Modern creations incorporating centuries-old skills will be presented at the Virginia Indian Cultural Program March 19 at The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen. It is part of Henrico County’s 400th Anniversary observation.

History and contemporary culture of Virginia Indian tribes will be presented through art, dance and exhibits. Indian artisans will display their pottery, beadwork, leatherwork, and painting, demonstrate their creative processes and discuss their work with the public.

History told through dance
One of the most spectacular – and most popular – components of the program will be the dancing.

The Virginia Indian Intertribal Drum and Dancers will tell stories of native history and culture by performing traditional and contemporary tribal dances. Dancers will explain the regalia they wear as well as the meaning and significance of each dance they perform.

“We have dancers from several different tribes,” said Adkins. “We’ve taken the dances that we have as individual tribes and taught them to one another. Plus, we have dances we’ve learned from other tribes at Powwows and other events. “

“So often, the general public thinks dances are just people jumping up and down, and they don’t realize most dances have a purpose. So while we’re entertaining, we’re educating.”

Celebrating 400+ years
The Virginia Indian Cultural Program was an initiative of the Commemoration of the Henrico 400th Anniversary Commission, said Karen Perkins, history manager for Henrico County’s Division of Recreation and Parks.

The program also will incorporate part of the “Beyond Jamestown” exhibit displayed at the state Capitol.

In The Cultural Arts Center’s Gallery, the exhibit, “By Our Hands: Virginia Indian Cultural Arts” will be on display through May 8.

The exhibit incorporates the artwork of contemporary Indian artists and artisans, including beadwork, leatherwork, wood carving and painting.

Also, a photography exhibit titled, “Family Portraits: Virginia Indians at the Turn of the 20th Century,” which features formal and informal portraits, will be on view.

Teaching Virginians about Native American culture is an ongoing process, said Adkins. He and other tribal elders work with Henricus Historical Park and other museums, the Indian tribes and Virginia educators to prepare materials for students. They want to ensure that Virginia schoolchildren are exposed to accurate information.

Eight tribes
Historians estimate that people lived in Virginia for more than 15,000 years before European contact.

Today, there are 11 tribes officially recognized by the Commonwealth of Virginia. They include: Mattaponi; Pamunkey; Chickahominy; Eastern Chickahominy; Monacan Indian Nation; Nansemond; Rappahannock; Upper Mattaponi; Cheroenhaka (Nottoway); Nottoway of Virginia; Patawomeck

Two tribes, the Pamunkey and the Mattaponi, have small reservations in King William County, dating back several centuries.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Preschoolers give pillows to families in need


A group of preschoolers from Chesterbrook Academy Preschool donated 56 pillows to local families in need at the Housing Families First shelter. The shelter is always in need of pillows and linens as, since families take the donated ones with them to their new homes.

Housing Families First provides shelter and support for homeless families and assist them in finding a permanent housing solution. The shelter serves people year-round, said Terri Iguina, operations and volunteer manager at Housing Families First. > Read more.

Dairy Queen’s Blizzard sales July 27 to benefit Children’s Hospital of Richmond


Dairy Queen’s 13th Annual Miracle Treat Day – Thursday, July 27 – will raise fund to benefit sick and injured children being treated at Children's Miracle Network hospitals throughout the United States. Locally, $1 or more from every Blizzard Treat sold at participating locations will be donated to the Children's Hospital of Richmond at VCU. Last year, the event raised more than $14,400 for the hospital. > Read more.

Crime Stoppers’ Crime of the Week: July 24, 2017


Crime Stoppers needs your help to find the person who struck a pedestrian in the City of Richmond.

On July 21 at 12:52 a.m., a woman was crossing the street at Forest Hill and Sheila Lane when she was struck by a dark colored four-door sedan that was traveling eastbound on Forest Hill. She was transported by ambulance to Chippenham Hospital for minor injuries and released. > Read more.

Henrico Police locate missing man

Henrico Police have located a missing 46-year-old Henrico man.

Police had reported Kevin William Cannelli missing this weekend, after he was last seen July 18. He was located safe in the Richmond area July 24. > Read more.

Business in brief


For the ninth year in a row, Puritan Cleaners is conducting a one-day-only community program that offers everyone in Richmond a free cleaning of one pair of pants. The event, called Free Pants Wednesday, will be held on Wednesday, Aug. 2. The offer is good at all 13 Puritan locations throughout the greater Richmond area with no strings attached. There are no minimums or other stipulations (other than suede and leather pants are excluded). This year, Puritan has partnered with the Richmond SPCA to help raise awareness for the Free Pants Wednesday program while also raising awareness for homeless kittens awaiting adoption at the Richmond SPCA’s humane center. The two organizations collaborated on a short movie which can be viewed at http://www.puritancleaners.com/community/free-pants-wednesday. This video is the latest in the light-hearted, low-budget, and intentionally campy videos associated with the Free Pants Wednesday program. Previous versions have featured racing at Richmond Raceway, ex-VCU basketball coach Shaka Smart, Todd “Parney” Parnell and the Flying Squirrels, and Bill Bevins and Shelly Perkins of Easy 100.9. > Read more.

Henrico Business Bulletin Board

July 2017
S M T W T F S
·
·
·
·
·
·
3
5
·
·
·
·
·

Calendar page

Classifieds

Place an Ad | More Classifieds

Calendar

Twin Hickory Library will offer the family workshop “How to Build a Robot” from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Bridget Westhoven, of Deep Run's World Champion Robotics Team (FRC 1086 Blue Cheese), will share the process and story behind how her family built their own robot from scratch, expanding on what they learned through FIRST Robotics. For details, call 501-1920 or visit http://www.henricolibrary.org. Full text

Your weather just got better.

Henricopedia

Henrico's Top Teachers

The Plate