Henrico County VA

Villa celebrates expansion

Five years of various construction projects have transformed and enhanced the 178-year-old campus of St. Joseph’s Villa into a modern, vibrant facility that serves as a safe and efficient community resource for families.

Earlier this month, Villa officials gathered with clients, volunteers, students, Henrico County Manager Virgil Hazelett and Fairfield Supervisor Frank Thornton to celebrate the campus’ transformation.

There was a strong sense of excitement and accomplishment in the air during the June 6 event at the Villa, where the changes will ensure that it remains a vital resource for needy families – 82 percent of them from Henrico. The improvements have helped the Villa build new partnerships, increase capacity, improve efficiency and expand the scope of its services.

“Before this project, we were serving 800 [people] – now we are serving about 2,000,” said Board of Trustees member JoAnne K. Henry.

The renovation is the first major construction of infrastructure and roadways on the 82 acre campus since 1931. A major investment is the new perimeter road that makes it safer for the 450 vehicles that access the campus each day, while removing them from the pedestrian walkways and safeguarding clients, staff, visitors and children.

“My son has attended the Villa for four years and will be graduating this year. I think it’s wonderful and it gives the children time to walk through the school without cars going by,” said parent Jaralyn McIntosh. “It’s the best idea they could’ve come up with.”

Other significant features include a new culinary arts center for dining and career training, a pedestrian avenue and walkways to connect buildings and campus resources, renovation of the gym and underground infrastructures including utilities and technology and restoration of the central garden and green spaces to promote outdoor learning and therapy.

The transformation began five years ago when architects, board members, engineers and staff devised a master plan for the future of St. Joseph’s Villa with safety and transportation as the main goals.

The building committee, led by Villa Chairman John Gentry, held monthly meetings for 26 months to create budgets plans and implement work. The Villa launched its first ever capital campaign, “Believing is Seeing,” with a goal of $10 million. Despite launching the campaign during one of the worst economic recessions in recent history, the Villa reached 99 percent of its goal. The money raised came from various donations from businesses, grants, staff, board members and friends.

The transformation is one that not only has helped expand the reach and scope of services the Villa can offer but has also been an example for the students.

“The number one reason to love the new campus is because of inspiration for transformation. Seeing what the campus has become inspires a sense of possibility in the individuals that they serve here,” said Villa senior Ellen Trebour during the grand reopening.

Said Villa CEO Kathleen Barrett: “They have been thrilled; we asked the students for their input and how they felt about everything. They were involved every step of the way, and everyone loves the finished project.”

Established in 1834 by the Daughters of Charity to serve as an orphanage and school, the Villa has now evolved as the oldest and largest continuously operating children’s nonprofit organization in the metro region. It is a non-religious affiliated, non-profit organization that works to serve children and families by providing children with special needs the opportunity to succeed through innovative educational and day programs. Many of those served are dealing with autism, homelessness, or physical and mental disabilities that would classify the children as “at risk.”

The project was recently awarded the Greater Richmond Association Commercial Real Estate Award for the best site improvements in 2011. The project finished under budget and before the targeted completion date.

Community

Lions Club donates backpacks to elementary school

The Richmond West Breakfast Lions Club (based in western Henrico) recently donated 59 backpacks to the Westover Hills Elementary School on Jahnke Road.

Above, club members display some of the backpacks prior to their distribution. > Read more.

Glen Allen student to perform at Carnegie Hall

Thanks to a first-place win in The American Protege International Vocal Competition 2014, Glen Allen High School student Matija Tomas will travel to New York City to perform at Carnegie Hall in December.

At the first-place winners recital in Weill Hall, Matija will perform Giacomo Puccini’s opera aria, “Chi il bel sogna di doretta.” She will perform with other vocalists from around the world and have the opportunity to win other awards and scholarships.

Locally, Thomas has performed with Richmond’s renowned Glorious Christmas Nights, Christian Youth Theatre, and WEAG’s Urban Gospel Youth Choir. > Read more.

Gayton Baptist Church dedicates new outreach center


The John Rolfe YMCA and Gayton Baptist Church have partnered in an effort to bring greater health and wellness opportunities to the community.

Through this partnership, the John Rolfe Y will run Youth Winter Sports programs, including basketball and indoor soccer, in Gayton’s newly renovated $5.5 million outreach center that features a new gymnasium, youth and teen space, social space with café, meeting space and full service commercial kitchen. > Read more.

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Entertainment

A terrible, horrible movie. . . that’s actually pretty good

‘Alexander’ provides uncomplicated family fun
It’s not surprising in the least that Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day doesn’t much resemble the book it’s based upon.

Judith Viorst’s 1972 picture book isn’t exactly overflowing with movie-worthy material. Boy has bad day. Boy is informed that everyone has bad days sometimes. Then, the back cover.

In the film, the terrible, horrible, no good, very bad-ness is blown up to more extreme size. Alexander Cooper (Ed Oxenbould) has a bum day every day, while the rest of his family (Steve Carell, Jennifer Garner, Dylan Minnette, Kerris Dorsey) exist in a constant bubble of perfection and cheery optimism – to the point that the family is so wrapped up in their own success that Alexander’s being ignored.

So on the eve of his 12th birthday, Alexander makes a wish: just once, he’d like his family to see things from his perspective; to experience the crushing disappointment of one of those no good, very bad days. Once he has blown out the candle on his pre-birthday ice cream sundae, his family’s fate is sealed: one full day of crippling disasters for all of them. > Read more.

Deep Run HS plans fall musical

Tickets for Deep Run High School’s fall musical production – Aida – will go on sale Nov. 3. The Elton John-Tim Rice pop opera, inspired by Verdi’s classic opera, tells the story of enslaved Nubian princess Aida, who falls for captain of the guard Radames, who is betrothed to the Egyptian princess.

Performances will be held Nov. 13-15 at 7 p.m. each day. > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


For our Top 10 calendar events this weekend, click here! > Read more.

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