Villa celebrates expansion

Five years of various construction projects have transformed and enhanced the 178-year-old campus of St. Joseph’s Villa into a modern, vibrant facility that serves as a safe and efficient community resource for families.

Earlier this month, Villa officials gathered with clients, volunteers, students, Henrico County Manager Virgil Hazelett and Fairfield Supervisor Frank Thornton to celebrate the campus’ transformation.

There was a strong sense of excitement and accomplishment in the air during the June 6 event at the Villa, where the changes will ensure that it remains a vital resource for needy families – 82 percent of them from Henrico. The improvements have helped the Villa build new partnerships, increase capacity, improve efficiency and expand the scope of its services.

“Before this project, we were serving 800 [people] – now we are serving about 2,000,” said Board of Trustees member JoAnne K. Henry.

The renovation is the first major construction of infrastructure and roadways on the 82 acre campus since 1931. A major investment is the new perimeter road that makes it safer for the 450 vehicles that access the campus each day, while removing them from the pedestrian walkways and safeguarding clients, staff, visitors and children.

“My son has attended the Villa for four years and will be graduating this year. I think it’s wonderful and it gives the children time to walk through the school without cars going by,” said parent Jaralyn McIntosh. “It’s the best idea they could’ve come up with.”

Other significant features include a new culinary arts center for dining and career training, a pedestrian avenue and walkways to connect buildings and campus resources, renovation of the gym and underground infrastructures including utilities and technology and restoration of the central garden and green spaces to promote outdoor learning and therapy.

The transformation began five years ago when architects, board members, engineers and staff devised a master plan for the future of St. Joseph’s Villa with safety and transportation as the main goals.

The building committee, led by Villa Chairman John Gentry, held monthly meetings for 26 months to create budgets plans and implement work. The Villa launched its first ever capital campaign, “Believing is Seeing,” with a goal of $10 million. Despite launching the campaign during one of the worst economic recessions in recent history, the Villa reached 99 percent of its goal. The money raised came from various donations from businesses, grants, staff, board members and friends.

The transformation is one that not only has helped expand the reach and scope of services the Villa can offer but has also been an example for the students.

“The number one reason to love the new campus is because of inspiration for transformation. Seeing what the campus has become inspires a sense of possibility in the individuals that they serve here,” said Villa senior Ellen Trebour during the grand reopening.

Said Villa CEO Kathleen Barrett: “They have been thrilled; we asked the students for their input and how they felt about everything. They were involved every step of the way, and everyone loves the finished project.”

Established in 1834 by the Daughters of Charity to serve as an orphanage and school, the Villa has now evolved as the oldest and largest continuously operating children’s nonprofit organization in the metro region. It is a non-religious affiliated, non-profit organization that works to serve children and families by providing children with special needs the opportunity to succeed through innovative educational and day programs. Many of those served are dealing with autism, homelessness, or physical and mental disabilities that would classify the children as “at risk.”

The project was recently awarded the Greater Richmond Association Commercial Real Estate Award for the best site improvements in 2011. The project finished under budget and before the targeted completion date.

Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Environmentalists say budget hurts efforts to protect bay

Environmental groups are outraged at the Trump administration’s proposed funding cuts for Chesapeake Bay cleanup programs.

President Donald Trump’s budget plan, released last week, reduces the budget for the federal Environmental Protection Agency by 31 percent. That includes a $427 million in funding to address regional pollution, such as the Chesapeake Bay protection efforts. The proposed budget would eliminate funding for the EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Program, which received $73 million from the federal government in 2016. > Read more.

Glen Allen ES principal receives REB Award


Melissa Halquist-Pruden, principal of Henrico County’s Glen Allen Elementary School, earned the 2016-17 REB Award for Distinguished Educational Leadership. The Community Foundation presents the award to four principals annually – one each from the school systems of Henrico, Chesterfield and Hanover counties and one from the city of Richmond schools.

The award recognizes principals who go beyond the day-to-day demands of their jobs to create an exceptional educational environment. The award stresses management and communication skills, and the ability to inspire, encourage and advocate for the school. > Read more.

Grant to help Hermitage H.S. upgrade CTE program equipment


Governor Terry McAuliffe announced recently that Henrico County’s Hermitage H.S. will be among 16 high schools and technical centers statewide to receive a grant to upgrade equipment for career and technical education (CTE) programs.

The program gives priority to challenged schools, Governor's STEM Academies and Governor's Health Science Academies. Each school or center will receive $37,500 to purchase new equipment and make other necessary improvements. At Hermitage, the funds will be used for precision machining equipment. > Read more.

Virginia raises a toast to George Washington’s whiskey


George Washington is recognized as the father of our country, but with a bill signed into law by Gov. Terry McAuliffe, Washington also will be recognized under another title – distiller of Virginia’s official liquor.

SB 1261, sponsored by Sen. Adam Ebbin of Alexandria, adds a “state spirit” to the list of the commonwealth’s official emblems and designations and crowns George Washington’s rye whiskey with the title.

The bill, which McAuliffe signed last week, highlights George Washington’s contributions to the culture of Virginia as “a native son of Virginia born on February 22, 1732, in Pope’s Creek”; “the first American president, commander of the Continental Army, and president of the Constitutional Convention”; and “a model statesman ... universally acknowledged as the father of our nation.” > Read more.

McAuliffe vetoes 6 more bills; GOP calls him ‘disengaged’


Gov. Terry McAuliffe on Monday vetoed six bills, including three Republicans said would help prevent voter fraud but the Democratic governor said would create barriers to voting.

McAuliffe has now vetoed 37 bills from the General Assembly’s 2017 session – and 108 during his four-year term as governor, surpassing any of his predecessors.

Republican legislative leaders say McAuliffe has broken his promise to be bipartisan, calling his office “the most disengaged administration we have ever worked with.” > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

Metro Diner to open second Henrico location


Metro Diner, a comfort food concept, will open its second Henrico location next month. The company is accepting job applications for its Libbie Place location at 5626 West Broad Street. The diner concept, known for its fried chicken and waffles, meatloaf, and shrimp and grits, will bring 100 new jobs to the region as it plans to open its doors in April.

The 3,500-square-foot diner located in the Libbie Place Shopping Center will seat more than 100 and serve classic comfort food staples with a twist, such as fried chicken and waffles topped with strawberry butter and a stuffed challah bread French toast with strawberry and blueberry compote. > Read more.

 

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The Modlin Center for the Arts at the University of Richmond will present The Nile Project at 7:30 p.m. in Camp Concert Hall, Booker Hall of Music. The Nile Project, conceived by Egyptian ethnomusicologist Mina Girgis and Ethiopian-American singer Meklit Hadero, consists of a dozen musicians who hail from every country bordering the Nile River. The Nile Project’s mission is to “educate, inspire, and empower the citizens of the Nile basin to foster the sustainability of the Nile River’s ecosystem.” Tickets are $36. A pre-show Artistic Viewpoint Discussion will start at 6:30 p.m. For details, call 289-8980 or visit http://www.modlin.richmond.edu. Full text

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