Training ‘global citizens’ for global economy

Mirta Martin, dean of Virginia State University’s school of business, is always looking for new ways to help students learn.

For instance, Martin led the school’s push in 2010 to offer the core curriculum in a digital format. Today, students at the Reginald F. Lewis School of Business are able to download textbooks and other class materials at no cost.

Earlier this month, Gate B2 at the Richmond International Airport became one of Martin’s latest learning launch pads as VSU students Cierra Wilson and Valarie Simpson departed for China.

Wilson and Simpson are spending a semester at Shanghai University as part of VSU’s Caterpillar Global Citizen’s program. Two other VSU students, Nakeya Johnston-Peterson and Ulysses Knight, also are studying at the Chinese college.

“This is the very first time that Virginia State and the Reginald F. Lewis School of Business have sent any students overseas to China,” Martin said. “For these students, it’s a remarkable opportunity because not only are they making history, but also they get to experience a way of life that is quite different from here in the United States.”

Martin said the international experience will help prepare the students for careers in a global economy.

The life-changing adventure for the students started when Caterpillar Foundation invited VSU to apply for a grant through the U.S. State Department’s “100,000 Strong Initiative.”

President Obama launched the initiative in 2010 in an effort to increase the number and diversity of U.S. students who travel to China to study.

“This initiative seeks to prepare the next generation of American experts on China who will be charged with managing the growing political, economic and cultural ties between the United States and China,” according to the State Department’s website.

The program is supported financially by private companies and China has committed 10,000 scholarships for American students to study there.

Maxine Sample, director of VSU's George Bennett International Studies Institute, learned about Caterpillar’s invitation in September 2011.

She submitted a grant application and by October, VSU learned that it would receive $84,000 for the business school’s semester-long program and a second summer study program.

Sample was thrilled to learn that VSU students would be going to China in part because of her own experiences.

“[Education abroad] has been my passion since I won a Fulbright award in 1995 to teach in Nairobi,” she said. “I decided I would find ways for students to share that experience.”

Sample was at the airport along with Martin, other VSU staff and proud family members as Wilson, a senior management information systems major, and Simpson, a junior marketing major, started the first leg of their journey.

Flying to China is a big deal. It’s an even bigger deal if you’ve never flown. The flight was expected to take about 17 hours.

“I am 21 years old and I have been here on the ground for 21 years,” said Wilson, a Dinwiddie native. “I’m kind of scared.”

Despite a few pre-flight jitters, Wilson and Simpson, who had flown once before, were eager to get off the ground.

They were already thinking about the challenges and new adventures waiting for them when they got to China.

“It will probably be difficult to learn the [Mandarin] language,” Simpson said. “[Learning] their lifestyle will be fun and exciting because their customs are different from what I experience on a daily basis.”

They also expect the semester abroad to help when they start their careers.

“[This] will look good on my resume.” Wilson said. “Going to another country to experience a difference culture, how they live and how they work will make me more prepared for the real world.”

The students had a layover in Newark where they were joined by the two other VSU students. Then it was on to Shanghai to connect with other American students studying there this semester.

The VSU group is due back in the country in mid-May. By then Martin will no doubt already be well on her way to developing the next opportunity for another group of VSU students to take flight and learn.

A childhood dream realized
Ulysses Knight, from Phoenixville, Pa., is one of the four VSU students studying in Shanghai. Knight did not qualify for the Caterpillar Foundation grant.

However, Merri Incitti of the Reginald F. Lewis School of Business, said Knight is in China as a result of his long-held passion to study there.

“The faculty and staff of the [business college] came together to ensure that [Ulysses], who has had a true desire to go to China for as long as we have known him, would not be left behind,” Incitti said.

Some of his expenses are being covered by a George Bennett International Exchange student scholarship.

Knight, who flew out of Newark, shared his thoughts about the trip by email before he left for Shanghai:

Q. Why do you want to study in China? What do you think will be the greatest benefit of a semester in China?

A. I’ve always had a fascination with China's culture, infrastructural design and business concepts. The greatest benefit would be to get a firsthand look at the business concepts being done and learning them, as well as being immersed into the culture and lifestyle of another country, which in turn will make me a better leader of tomorrow.


Q. What do you think will be the most difficult part of the semester? What do you expect will be the most fun and why?

A. I believe the most difficult part will be the first week. At Virginia State University, I am very active with two jobs and being the senior class president so it will be a time of adjustment to becoming strictly a student. The most fun will be being able to experience one of my lifetime dreams. Most people dream about going to Disney Land as a little kid but my dream has always been to go to China.

Q. How have you prepared for the semester in China?

A. I have purchased the Mandarin Chinese edition from Rosetta Stone and made a blog and Skype account so I still have some type of communication with family and friends in the states.

Q. What do your parents think about the trip?

A. My parents are my biggest supporters and are very excited for the trip. Both my mother and father are always telling me, ‘You can do anything you put your mind to so if you’re going to dream, dream big!!’
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Henrico Police arrest 2 Georgia men in connection with January murder


Henrico Police have arrested and charged two Georgia men with first-degree murder in connection with the Jan. 18 murder of 36-year-old Lamont Cornelius Baldwin in the 1200 block of Dominion Townes Terrace.

Antonio Tyrone Johnson (above, left) and Santonio Rodrigus Brown (above, right), both 24 and both of Atlanta, were charged. Johnson also was charged with use of a firearm in commission of a felony and possession of a firearm by a felon. > Read more.

Man struck and killed in western Henrico hit-and-run

A 24-year-old man died after being struck by a hit-and-run driver in western Henrico April 23.

The victim, Emmanuel Isaiah DeJesus, was found lying on the side of the roadway at about 10:25 p.m., April 23 near Patterson Avenue and Palace Way. He was transported to a local hospital, where he was pronounced dead. > Read more.

Henrico woman earns national pharmacy fellowship


Henrico County native Nilofar “Nellie” Jafari recently was named the American College of Clinical Pharmacy-American Society of Health-System Pharmacists-Virginia Commonwealth University Congressional Healthcare Policy Fellow for 2017-18.

Jafari is a 2007 graduate of J.R. Tucker High School.

Pharmacists selected for the fellowship have the opportunity to gain real-world insight into health care policy analysis and development via immersion in the congressional environment. > Read more.

Section of Lauderdale Drive to be closed April 26 for drainage improvements


The westbound lanes of Lauderdale Drive will be closed between John Rolfe Parkway and Cambridge Drive on Wednesday, April 26 for drainage improvements.

The lanes are expected to be closed from approximately 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Motorists will be detoured from westbound Lauderdale onto John Rolfe, Gayton Road and Cambridge before being directed back onto Lauderdale. > Read more.

Henrico Police to host prescription drug take-back event April 29


The Henrico County Division of Police and the U. S. Drug Enforcement Administration will participate in the nationwide Prescription Drug Take Back Program Saturday, April 29. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Henrico County Training Center, 7701 East Parham Road, next to the Public Safety Building.

The program is free and anonymous. Unused or expired pills, patches and liquid prescriptions (in their sealed original container) will be accepted. Needles and sharp items will not be accepted. No questions will be asked. > Read more.
Community

YMCA event will focus on teen mental health


The YMCA, in partnership with the Cameron K. Gallagher Foundation and PartnerMD, will host a free event May 2 to help parents learn how to deal with teen mental health issues. “When the Band-Aid Doesn’t Fix It: A Mom’s Perspective on Raising a Child Who Struggles” will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Shady Grove Family YMCA,11255 Nuckols Road. The event will focus on education, awareness, and understanding the issues facing teens today. > Read more.

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.
Entertainment

Restaurant Watch


Find out how your favorite dining establishments fared during their most recent inspections by the Virginia Department of Health. > Read more.

 

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The Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation will host the Virginia Ride for Kids at 11 a.m. The family-friendly loop ride begins at Richmond International Raceway and travels through Henrico County. Any make or model of street legal motorcycle is welcome. There will be activities for non-riders as well, including a bike show, food, vendors, speakers and activities for the whole family. The Virginia Ride for Kids is one of 30 PBTF-hosted motorcycle rides taking place this year. Now in its 15th year, the Virginia Ride for Kids has raised more than $1.1 million to help the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation fund childhood brain tumor research and life-changing family support programs. Admission is free but a minimum donation of $40 per motorcycle is encouraged. For details, visit http://www.rideforkids.org. Full text

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