The struggle to commemorate slavery

The Virginia Historical Society’s “Unknown No Longer” slave names database is just one of the steps toward connecting today’s African-Americans to their past. But sometimes giving a voice to the past is not simply a click away.

Since its discovery in 2008, the African Burial Ground in Richmond has been a controversial topic. Now, a community group is doing everything it can to give the burial ground the respect it deserves.

The Defenders for Freedom, Justice and Equality is made of individuals active in issues such as politics, race and sexism. They have worked to maintain Richmond’s black history.

The Defenders’ most recent project has been the African Burial Ground, where slaves and/or free blacks were interred in what is now Shockoe Bottom. The group created a special committee to seek recognition and dignity for the African Burial Ground.

The Defenders aren’t the only ones looking out for black history in Richmond.

The Richmond Slave Trail Commission was started by Richmond City Council in 1998 to shed light on the history of slavery in Richmond. The commission recently erected markers designating a trail of key sites related to the city’s role in the slave trade.

Delegate Delores L. McQuinn, who chairs the commission, said the slave trail means a hidden story is finally being told. She said it means bringing balance to the history of Richmond, and to the people who have been forgotten or unidentified.

“It symbolizes perseverance and fortitude of people who were determined, even though they were considered less than or almost nonexistent other than for labor and economic purposes,” McQuinn said.

Besides unveiling the slave trail markers, the commission continues to work with the Defenders for Freedom, Justice and Equality on the burial ground.

Shockoe Bottom is known for its bar scene. The burial ground was discovered during a ground survey that connected modern urban structures with historical maps. Two of the maps showed a space called “The Burial Ground for Negroes.”

Historians believe the burial ground was in use from 1786-1819. Because the word slave does not appear in the title on the map, many think the burial site was used not for slaves but for free blacks.

After it was discovered, the Virginia Department of Historical Resources compiled an assessment of the burial grounds. The department hypothesized that a piece of the burial ground lies beneath a Virginia Commonwealth University parking lot. Since this discovery, community groups have been calling for VCU to remove the parking lot.

The site received recognition this year when it was included among the 17 slave trail markers erected by the City Council. However, the Defenders for Freedom, Justice and Equality want more for the burial ground. They believe the parking lot should be removed so the site can be properly commemorated.

On April 10, prominent public officials spoke at the unveiling of the slave trail markers. The speakers included Gov. Bob McDonnell, Richmond Mayor Dwight Jones and representatives of the Richmond Slave Trail Commission.

Many people used the opportunity to protest VCU’s continued use of the African Burial Ground as a parking lot.

On April 12, just days after the markers went up, eight Defenders stood in the parking lot, calling for VCU to shut down the lot. The group’s vigil began at 6:30 a.m., as VCU employees were arriving for work.

Because they were blocking the parking lot, four of the Defenders were arrested and face a trial date in late May. The group has started an online petition to tell VCU to get its “ass-fault” off the burial ground. Currently, the petition has more than 250 signatures.

McDonnell raised the issue of the African Burial Ground at the slave trail celebration. He announced that he would sign a bill to transfer the property from VCU to the city of Richmond.

“Working together with the mayor as I have over these last few months and years, and with the leadership at VCU, we will do everything possible to tear up this asphalt as soon as possible and properly restore this site,” McDonnell said.

Professor Shawn Utsey, who chairs VCU’s Department of African-American Studies, said that the governor’s announcement is progress and that things are moving in the right direction. But Utsey said more should be done.

Utsey feels passionately about the burial ground. He is a member of the Slave Trail Commission and creator of a documentary, “Meet Me in the Bottom: The Struggle to Reclaim Richmond's African Burial Ground.”

“The way I was raised, you didn’t park your car – in fact, you didn’t walk – on a grave site unless you were going to see somebody whom you had lost. But even then … you would walk very carefully and show respect,” Utsey said.

He compared the situation to parking a car on one of the gravestones in Hollywood Cemetery, where many Confederate soldiers are buried. “Try parking your car on top of those and see what happens to you.”

Utsey said the next steps are to remove the cars and then the asphalt – and then to discuss what should follow. Some people believe a memorial should be built on the site. Utsey said research should be done to tell the story of the people whose remains lie in the African Burial Ground.
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A safer way across


A project years in the making is beginning to make life easier for wheelchair-bound residents in Northern Henrico.

The Virginia Department of Transportation is completing a $2-million set of enhancements to the Brook Road corridor in front of St. Joseph's Villa and the Hollybrook Apartments, a community that is home to dozens of disabled residents. > Read more.

New conservation easement creates wooded buffer for Bryan Park

Five years ago, members of the Friends of Bryan Park were facing the apparently inevitable development of the Shirley subdivision in Henrico, adjacent to the forested section of the park near the Nature Center and Environmental Education Area.

As part of the Shirley subdivision, the land had been divided into 14 lots in 1924, but had remained mostly undisturbed through the decades. In 2012, however, developers proposed building 40 modular houses on roughly 6.5 acres, clear-cutting the forest there and creating a highly dense neighborhood tucked into a dead end. > Read more.

Meet the men running for governor


Virginia will elect a new governor this year.

The governor’s position is one of great power and influence, as the current officeholder, Terry McAuliffe, has demonstrated by breaking the record for most vetoes in Virginia history.

However, during the last gubernatorial race in 2014, the voter turnout was less than 42 percent, compared with 72 percent during last year’s presidential election. > Read more.

RISC to address reading, childhood trauma, job training at assembly

On May 1, more than 1,700 community members representing Richmonders Involved to Strengthen our Communities will gather at St. Paul’s Baptist Church (4247 Creighton Road) at 7 p.m. to address elementary reading, childhood trauma and job training in the greater Richmond region. Community members will speak about each issue and proposed solution.

For three years, the organization has sought implementation of a specific literacy program in Henrico County that it believes would help children who struggle with reading. > Read more.

Henrico to begin update of zoning, subdivision ordinances April 26


Henrico County is beginning a comprehensive update of its zoning and subdivision ordinances — the first such effort in six decades — and will introduce the project as part of the April 26 meeting of the Henrico County Planning Commission.

The meeting will begin at 9 a.m. in the Board Room of the Henrico Government Center, 4301 E. Parham Road. The ordinance update project will be featured as the final item on the agenda. Project consultant Clarion Associates will give a presentation, and meeting participants will be able to ask questions and provide comments. > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


For our Top 10 calendar events this weekend, click here! > Read more.

 

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Lavender Fields Herb Farm, 11300 Winfrey Rd. in Glen Allen, will offer the class “Container Gardening” from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Learn how to choose and arrange your plants, care for them and harvest. Potting mix is provided; cost of container, plants and any additional extras are not included. Class fee is $20. For details, call 262-7167 or visit http://www.lavenderfieldsfarm.com. Full text

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