Henrico County VA

The Entrepreneur’s Corner

Finding the right office space for your business
Moving your business stinks. It’s difficult, it’s expensive, and every step of the process takes a lot of time. But sometimes, and more often than not, the right space can make the business in the same way the right handshake can win the job.

There are so many options for business of all sizes. Even though Metro Richmond is a relatively small commercial market, there’s still every type of space imaginable. Making the wrong decision can actually hurt your business, so it makes sense to tackle it head-on. Think Gandhi with a little sprinkle of Bobby Knight – patience and grit pay off. And you should start by asking a lot of questions:

• Find a leader – Who will lead this effort within your organization? It’s a daunting task indeed, and it deserves a dedicated decision-maker willing to work through the pitfalls.

• Determine your space needs – Is your existing space too large? Too small? Inefficient? Too far from your clients? Outdated? Overpriced? Find your motivation and take action.

• Assess your business environment – How would you describe your office environment? Are you a big fan of collaboration, frequent dialogue, and teaming? If so you might prefer an open work environment rather than private offices. Do you rely on walk-in traffic or have frequent visitors throughout the day? If so, focus on high visibility locations, ample parking and a large enough reception area.

• Warm up your calculator – What is your budget? Be realistic and be honest with yourself about the company’s budget. Use the web to research how much commercial space costs in your desired locations, and don’t be afraid to call around to different broker professionals for their input.

Once you’ve completed the first phase, it’s time to get yourself aligned with a broker who can represent you in the process. Alternatively, you can represent yourself through the next steps, which include touring properties, developing a short list of your top two or three spaces, gathering offers (commonly referred to as Letters of Intent), negotiating and signing a lease.

While a few businesses choose to go without broker representation, most prefer the advantages of having an experienced professional to help them through each step.

This is usually when the Bobby Knight-like personality comes out in people. Negotiations have complex layers and it helps to have an expert broker working on your behalf to take the emotional, chair-throwing tendencies out of the process. If you do decide to take on the task yourself, here are a few things to keep in mind:

• Size does matter – Negotiating power is directly proportionate to the size of your office in relation to the size of the building. A small tenant in a large office building won’t have too much leverage over the ownership. That same tenant in a smaller office building, however, could get a better deal.

• Turn “deal-breakers” into negotiable points – For example, the ownership’s lease calls for a 5 percent annual escalation and you know the market escalation is 3 percent (which it is, by the way). That escalation rate seems like a deal breaker to you, but it is likely a negotiable point for the owner. If ownership insists on 5 percent, find another way around it – maybe ask for an increase in the tenant improvement allowance, or a reduction in the first year rental rate.

• Don’t be afraid to walk away.

• Ask questions until you get answers.

• Get everything in writing and make sure you and the ownership sign the same lease document.

Suzanne White is an associate who specializes in corporate real estate services, including office and industrial sales and leasing, with Cushman & Wakefield | Thalhimer. Contact her at (804) 697-3478 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).
Community

Lions Club donates backpacks to elementary school

The Richmond West Breakfast Lions Club (based in western Henrico) recently donated 59 backpacks to the Westover Hills Elementary School on Jahnke Road.

Above, club members display some of the backpacks prior to their distribution. > Read more.

Glen Allen student to perform at Carnegie Hall

Thanks to a first-place win in The American Protege International Vocal Competition 2014, Glen Allen High School student Matija Tomas will travel to New York City to perform at Carnegie Hall in December.

At the first-place winners recital in Weill Hall, Matija will perform Giacomo Puccini’s opera aria, “Chi il bel sogna di doretta.” She will perform with other vocalists from around the world and have the opportunity to win other awards and scholarships.

Locally, Thomas has performed with Richmond’s renowned Glorious Christmas Nights, Christian Youth Theatre, and WEAG’s Urban Gospel Youth Choir. > Read more.

Gayton Baptist Church dedicates new outreach center


The John Rolfe YMCA and Gayton Baptist Church have partnered in an effort to bring greater health and wellness opportunities to the community.

Through this partnership, the John Rolfe Y will run Youth Winter Sports programs, including basketball and indoor soccer, in Gayton’s newly renovated $5.5 million outreach center that features a new gymnasium, youth and teen space, social space with café, meeting space and full service commercial kitchen. > Read more.

Page 1 of 118 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›

Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


For our Top 10 calendar events this weekend, click here! > Read more.

Brews and bites done right

Urban Tavern’s big, bold themes impress

The Urban Tavern opened in August, replacing the former Shackelford’s space at 10498 Ridgefield Parkway in Short Pump. Because of local and longtime devotion to Shackleford’s, Urban Tavern has some big shoes to fill.

Without any background information, I headed to the restaurant for dinner on a Wednesday night, two months after its opening.

On a perfect fall evening, four out of eight outdoor tables were taken, giving the impression that the restaurant was busier than it was. On the inside, a couple tables were taken, and a few folks were seated at the bar. > Read more.

A terrible, horrible movie. . . that’s actually pretty good

‘Alexander’ provides uncomplicated family fun
It’s not surprising in the least that Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day doesn’t much resemble the book it’s based upon.

Judith Viorst’s 1972 picture book isn’t exactly overflowing with movie-worthy material. Boy has bad day. Boy is informed that everyone has bad days sometimes. Then, the back cover.

In the film, the terrible, horrible, no good, very bad-ness is blown up to more extreme size. Alexander Cooper (Ed Oxenbould) has a bum day every day, while the rest of his family (Steve Carell, Jennifer Garner, Dylan Minnette, Kerris Dorsey) exist in a constant bubble of perfection and cheery optimism – to the point that the family is so wrapped up in their own success that Alexander’s being ignored.

So on the eve of his 12th birthday, Alexander makes a wish: just once, he’d like his family to see things from his perspective; to experience the crushing disappointment of one of those no good, very bad days. Once he has blown out the candle on his pre-birthday ice cream sundae, his family’s fate is sealed: one full day of crippling disasters for all of them. > Read more.

Page 1 of 104 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›







 

Reader Survey | Advertising | Email updates

Classifieds

READERS & MUSIC LOVERS. 100 Greatest Novels (audio books) ONLY $99.00 (plus s h.) Includes MP3 Player & Accessories. BONUS: 50 Classical Music Works & Money Back Guarantee. Call Today!… Full text

Place an Ad | More Classifieds

Calendar

The third annual UkeFest VA, a music filled weekend featuring regional ukulele aficionados and nationally renowned ukulele performers, will take place at 7 p.m. Nov. 7 and from 11 a.m.… Full text

Your weather just got better.

Henricopedia

Henrico's Top Teachers