Henrico County VA
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The beat goes on

Danger, surprise just part of the job for Henrico police officers
False alarms, fist fights, paperwork, gunshots, belligerent drunkenness, more gunshots, another fight, and more paperwork are among the elements that can constitute the Saturday night schedule of a Henrico County Police officer like Justin Coullier on “the beat.”

Coullier’s patrol area is the North district, the place most know as Glen Allen. On this night, he and his partner; Officer Andrew Campo, will respond to approximately 10 calls. Each of these calls requires a thorough assessment, and nowhere in the department handbook does it stipulate that each is to take the same amount of time.

With Bon Jovi whispering in the background to relieve the stress, Coullier patrols a dark winding back road looking for suspicious activity. This time, it is the activity that finds him, in the form of a pair of headlights approaching head on without slowing down.

Narrowly avoiding a collision and without missing a beat, or his siren activator, Coullier throws the cruiser into a U-turn, getting the driver’s attention seconds before she hits another car. Thinking it may be a drunk driver, Coullier must restrain his own emotions in order to ascertain whether or not the situation will call for an arrest. It doesn’t. The driver is an emotional elderly woman who must collect her thoughts before getting back on the road. Running his rugged hands over his buzzed head to clear the sweat, Coullier clears the scene.

After writing the ticket and clearing his head, Coullier has moved on to another call, a domestic conflict. The subjects are given lined sheets of paper and told to make a report, while Coullier and Campo return to their cars to finish their own. With a thin, long grin on his face, Campo begins discussing the night’s events as Coullier mirrors the same grin in a pal-ish affirmation. A fellow officer announces that he is in a foot pursuit on the radio. The two officers listen to the radio with one ear and to each other with the other.

“Shots fired! Shots fired!” the radio sounds. The look on Campo’s face is now one of fear and tension, Coullier shows the same. Their eyes are wide, and the grins are gone.

Coullier’s “office” is now hastily advancing towards the scene in order to assist a fellow officer. Coullier must watch traffic, listen to the radio, look at the computer and monitor his speed all at the same time. It’s after midnight, and traffic is thin. On the scene, an abnormally high number of officers sit, watching and waiting for any sightings of the armed suspect. Coullier must return to his domestic call. As a brother would be disturbed to leave his sibling in a dangerous environment, so too is Coullier. But orders are orders.

The domestic dispute is cleared, the night rolls on, and Coullier and Campo have a few moments to discuss some of the night’s events. They will not be able to converse long before they receive their next call, which will be to break up a fight.

Afterwards, they’ll have to make an arrest of a suspect in a completely different neighborhood. A warrant must be sworn and an accident investigation must be completed.

Coullier and Campo, along with the other officers on the night shift, have now worked 11 of the 12 hours on their schedules.

While their sleep regimen may be reversed, their attitudes about their jobs force them to move forward with their tour of duty until it is time to clock out. Their jobs seem stressful because they are, but both men deal with that pressure for a reason. To Coullier, the job is constantly fulfilling, because it is always changing.

Henrico County officers such as Coullier and Campo have a reason they call their job “the beat.” It can be clean or it can be distorted, calm or aggressively loud, and the pace can change in a second.


Community

Varina Ruritans honor students

The Varina Ruritan Club hosted the winners of its 2014 Environmental Essay contest at its monthly meeting March 11 in Varina.

The contest, in its eighth year, was for the first time open to students in grades 3-5 at Varina Elementary School. (It previously was open to Sandston Elementary School students.)

The meeting included the winners, parents of the winners, Varina Elementary principal Mark Tyler and several teachers who were in charge of the contest at the school. > Read more.

Baseball game to benefit Glen Allen Buddy Ball


For the fifth consecutive year, St. Christopher’s and Benedictine will play a varsity baseball game at Glen Allen's RF&P Park as part of a fundraising effort for the River City Buddy Ball program.

The game will take place Saturday, April 12, at 7 p.m., and the teams hope to raise $3,000 through donations, raffles and other efforts. Admission to the game is free, but fans who attend are asked to donate funds for the Glen Allen Youth Athletic Association's Buddy Ball program, which enables disabled children and teens to play baseball. > Read more.

Highland Springs field to be dedicated in honor of longtime coach Spears

The Henrico Division of Recreation and Parks will dedicate the Highland Springs Little League Majors Field in memory and honor of Rev. Robert “Bob” L. Spears, Jr., on April 12 with a ceremony at the field at 8 a.m.

Spears served the league as a coach and volunteer for 30 years and was praised as a pioneer for equality. His “Finish strong” motto embodied ethical perseverance on the field and in life. > Read more.

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Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


Do the Bunny Hop over to Meadow Farm on Saturday for an introduction to all the farm animals there! An introduction to “Global Sounds” – featuring Japanese, Indonesian, West African, Indian, and Brazilian music and dance performances – can be found at the University of Richmond. The University of Richmond will also host the annual Spider spring game, as well as the inaugural Spiders Easter Egg Hunt. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

Restaurant watch

Find out how your favorite dining establishments fared during their most recent inspections by the Virginia Department of Health. > Read more.

A fun, fuzzy ride

‘Muppets Most Wanted’ worthy of its franchise

Do Muppets sleep? It’s hard to say.

They don’t really eat (or breathe, as far as anyone can tell). And only occasionally do they have visible, functioning legs.

As far as anyone knows, sleeping might be off the table. And that makes it very hard to accuse the Muppets of sleepwalking through their latest feature, Muppets Most Wanted – even if that’s exactly what’s going on.

Jim Henson’s beloved creations were back in a big way after 2011’s The Muppets, with fame and fortune and even an Oscar, a first for the group (“Rainbow Connection” was nominated, yet somehow failed to collect at the ’79 ceremony). > Read more.

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Registration ends today for the 2014 Henrico Citizens Academy, a five-week class beginning May 1 designed to give residents a comprehensive look at county operations and services. Classes will be… Full text

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