Henrico County VA

State to publish college grads’ employment rates

Amanda Neely, a 22-year-old nursing student, graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University on Saturday. She is anxious about finding a job.

“There are so many students graduating from the same nursing program that I am, and such a disproportionately small number of positions available. People assume that because I chose this field, I’m protected from unemployment, but I’m not convinced,” Neely said.

She has reasons for concern: Half of young college graduates are unemployed or underemployed, stuck in jobs that don’t use their skills and knowledge, according to recent research by the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University.

Degrees in such fields as nursing, accounting or computer science used to be a ticket to a high-paying job. But now, even those degrees are vulnerable – and graduates who majored in the arts and humanities are really struggling, according to the data analysis, which was conducted for the Associated Press.

Moreover, a 2011 survey found that young college graduates had an unemployment rate of more than 9 percent – higher than the national average and double the rate of other college graduates.

Some economists blame the recession for the dismal job prospects of today’s college graduates. Other experts say students choose impractical majors, such as history or philosophy, over subjects like science or engineering. However, little attention has focused on the schools themselves and how well they prepare students for jobs.

That will change next year. Under a new law, state officials will publish online the employment rates and average salaries for graduates from each institution of higher education in Virginia. Prospective students and their parents will be able to see the statistics for each program and type of degree at each school.

The State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, which oversees colleges and universities, will post the data on its website by Aug. 1, 2013. The data will include “the proportion of graduates with employment at 18 months and five years after the date of graduation for each public institution and each private nonprofit institution of higher education eligible to participate in the Tuition Assistance Grant Program.”

The reports will include “the percentage of graduates known to be employed in the Commonwealth, the average salary, and the average higher education-related debt for the graduates on which the data is based.”

The data will provide a report card of sorts for Virginia colleges and universities – showing how successful each institution’s graduates have been at landing jobs.

The new law was sponsored by Delegate Chris Stolle, a Republican from Virginia Beach. His proposal, House Bill 639, passed 95-5 in the House and 40-0 in the Senate. Gov. Bob McDonnell signed the bill into law on April 9.

A federal law, the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008, already requires schools to collect this information. It says colleges must make available to current and prospective students “information regarding the placement in employment of, and types of employment obtained by, graduates of the institution’s degree or certificate programs,” as well as the types of graduate and professional education in which their graduates enroll.

But some officials question the validity of the data collected under the federal law, and it is not widely disseminated. Few schools post their statistics online, and no website aggregates the data and makes it searchable.

Under Virginia’s new law, the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia will be largely responsible for the collection of college graduate employment data. With help from a $17.5 million federal grant, SCHEV will combine information from schools with data from agencies such as the Virginia Employment Commission and the state Department of Education. The data will be merged into a central database and identifying information will be removed to protect the graduates’ privacy.

The final result: Before enrolling in a school or declaring a major, prospective students will be able to see the job outlook for recent graduates.

“When people are looking into certain majors, they should be able to go and say, ‘Well, how many of these people are employed?’ ” said Kirsten Nelson, a public relations official with SCHEV.

Nelson said the data collected under the federal Higher Education Opportunity Act is flawed. When schools survey their graduates about employment, the response rates are notoriously low – about 6 percent. So the surveys don’t accurately capture the overall picture of graduates’ employment. Moreover, while the federal statute requires schools to college the data, they can get by without publicly reporting it.

Much of the graduate employment information collected under the federal law is useless, said Kevin Carey of EducationSector.org, a nonprofit think tank based in Washington, D.C.

Carey and Andrew Kelli published a report in 2011 called “The Truth Behind Higher Education Disclosure Laws,” examining colleges’ compliance with the Higher Education Opportunity Act. They found that only about 60 percent of schools provided any information at all about the employment of recent graduates.

According to the report, a number of colleges said the graduate employment information was available from their career services office – but only to students who had already enrolled. Others said they surveyed graduates about their employment status but would not share the results.

To provide a more accurate picture, Daniel said SCHEV plans to track students’ progress through secondary education and into the workforce. However, this method also may have problems.

SCHEV will track only students who complete primary and secondary education in Virginia and then seek employment in the state. It will not track students who move to other states for jobs after graduation.

Even so, any information may be better than nothing. Some recent graduates who are struggling to find work say they wish they had known more in advance about the job prospects associated with their degree. That information might have affected their decision about where to go to college or what to study.

“I think that finding a job after college is simple; it’s finding a job in your field that is the difficult part,” said Moretta Browne, who graduated from VCU in 2011 with a degree in advertising.

“Food service and retail are always looking for new hires, but that isn’t what I went to school for. I’ve spent a lot of energy trying to put together the perfect portfolio and résumé, and send it out, but with no success. I recently landed a job as a bank teller, but I also just read in a news article that my position may be non-existent in the near future.”
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Community

MADD to host candlelight vigil Dec. 2 at UR

Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) will host a candlelight vigil of remembrance and hope Tuesday, Dec. 2 at 7 p.m. at the University of Richmond, outside the Cannon Chapel. The public is invited to attend and join MADD to honor victims of impaired driving crashes, while helping to remind the community to be safe during the holidays. > Read more.

Tournament supports adoption efforts

Among participants at the Seventh Annual Coordinators2Inc Golf Tournament and awards luncheon Oct. 3 were (from left) Rebecca Ricardo, C2 Inc executive director; Kevin Derr, member of the winning foursome; Sharon Richardson, C2 Inc founder; and Frank Ridgway and Jon King, members of the winning foursome.

Held at The Crossings Golf Club, the tournament will benefit placement of children from Virginia's foster care system into permanent families through Coordinators2. > Read more.

A.C. Moore to host winter craft day for kids

Event will help kick of Marine Corps' 'Toys for Tots' campaign
All 140 A.C. Moore locations will serve as drop-off centers this year for the Marine Toys for Tots Foundation, and all toys collected will stay in the local communities served by the stores in which they are donated.

On Saturday, Nov. 15, the Willow Lawn location will kick off the month-long program by hosting a "Make & Take" craft event for kids. Children ages six and older will be able to make a craft and take it home with them. Representatives from the Marines will be in-store to teach customers about the Toys for Tots program. A.C. Moore team members will be on site to help with the crafts. > Read more.

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Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


The Dominion GardenFest of Lights Grand Illumination takes place tonight at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden! This year’s theme is “A Legacy in Lights: 120 Years from Bicycle Club to Botanical Garden,” which celebrates the Garden’s history. You can also celebrate Thanksgiving again – tomorrow at Henricus Historical Park. More great events – Lavender Fields Herb Farm and Wilton House Museum will both host their holiday open house events this weekend. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

A hero is born

Disney’s ‘Big Hero 6,’ lovable robot Baymax delight
It may be time for Olaf to step down as our nation’s reigning cartoon character. Big Hero 6, the latest animated feature from Disney, contains a challenger to the throne: Baymax (Scott Adsit), another lovably chubby white wonder, who will bring joy to children’s hearts and invade every home in America inside a six-foot pile of Disney merchandise.

Big Hero 6 (based ever so slightly on a Marvel comic of the same name) is the story of Baymax – and also his closest companion Hiro Hamada (Ryan Potter). And then also their four friends, all of whom join together to form the titular superhero team.

At first, though, it’s only Hiro, a young boy and an engineering prodigy, who’d rather spend his time in underground robot fight clubs than do something productive with his gifts. > Read more.

Authentically Italian

Bella’s feels – and tastes – like Italy should
Short Pump is known for its share of chain restaurants and strip malls, but diners looking for something more distinct can certainly find it without heading downtown or to nearby Charlottesville.

In fact, local husband-and-wife restaurateurs Valeria Bisenti and Doug Muir brought a taste of Charlottesville (and Italy) to Short Pump when they took a chance and opened Bella’s second location in the same shopping strip as Wal-Mart and Peter Chang China Cafe. (Bella’s original location is on Main Street in downtown Charlottesville.)

For a local Italian restaurant, Bella’s is as “Mom and Pop” as its gets. Valeria is Mom, and Doug is Pop. Since its opening about six months ago, diners have been eating rich comfort foods and drinking Italian wines. > Read more.

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Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden will present the Dominion GardenFest of Lights nightly from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Nov. 28 to Jan. 12 (closed Dec. 24-25). This holiday tradition features… Full text

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