Shift in power steadied Henrico’s future

Henrico County was on the verge of becoming an urban county in the early 1930s, but its government was not organized enough nor properly equipped to handle the growing daily demands it faced in order to operate efficiently, a state auditor wrote at the time. County residents took note, and a grassroots effort began to change the system.

The result: voter adoption in 1933 of the county manager form of government – a form that in the years since has proved a model for nearly all other county governments in Virginia but one that remains the only specific one of its kind in the state.

"That decision to go to the county manager form of government with a professional person heading the county on a day-to-day basis is what has led the county where it is now," said Bill LaVecchia, who served as county manager from 1984 to 1992.

For the impact it has had on Henrico's advancement through the 20th and 21st centuries, the establishment of the county manager form of government ranks No. 5 on the Henrico Citizen's list of the most significant moments in the county's 400-year history.

Several key factors prompted county voters in September 1933 to adopt the county manager form of government, author and county historian Nelson Wikstrom wrote in his 2003 book County Manager Form of Government in Henrico, Virginia: Implementation, Evolution and Evaluation. Among them: concern among citizens about the way their government was run and its financial situation; a report by the state auditor criticizing the management of the county's Board of Supervisors; and the popular displeasure with the idea of allowing the state to maintain county roads.

A grassroots effort among citizens in favor of the county manager form of government ensued, Wikstrom wrote, led perhaps most prominently by Henrico Citizens' League chairman J. Randolph Tucker. In a Sept. 19, 1933 referendum on the issue, voters narrowly approved the plan by a margin of 364 votes – 1,685 to 1,321.

There was controversy in the aftermath. The vote had prompted a new election that November for the four spots on the Board of Supervisors, whose sitting members originally were to serve through 1935. None of the four ran in the 1933 election, but they refused to surrender their seats to the newly elected members Jan. 1, 1934 and instead filed suit to stay in office, arguing that they should appoint the first county manager. A Henrico Circuit Court judge agreed with them but later was overruled by the Virginia Supreme Court, which authorized the newly elected supervisors to take office
and appoint a county manager.

Implementation of the county manager system allowed Henrico to implement a more professionally run government at a time when such organization was critical, former longtime deputy county manager Harvey Hinson said.

"It certainly has had a lot to do with the success that Henrico's had," said Hinson, who retired several years ago.

Prior to 1934, elected supervisors held control of the county and had the ability to make appointments and name department heads – a reality that in the minds of many created a system too politically based. The adoption of the county manager form of government transferred those powers to the county manager, who serves at the pleasure of the board as a whole and for whom political ties are less likely to cloud decision-making, supporters of the format reasoned.

Once the system was in place, the way Henrico functioned as a locality changed.

Henrico's first county manager, Willard Day, "had a keen interest in urban planning," Hinson recalled. "He came with the [necessary] background and he almost immediately started to have an impact on the Board of Supervisors and made them aware that they needed to come up with a Comprehensive Plan."

The county began working on planning regulations in the 1940s "when most in the country didn't even know what the word planning – as we know it and understand it today – was," said LaVecchia. "The county had zoning and subdivision ordinance in the 1950s, which was unheard of back then except in new York City and a few other places."

Though simple in nature and scope compared to the type of ordinances and regulations that exist today, those early documents nonetheless created a framework for future growth that most other localities lacked.

"The county has pretty much, from the day it formed the county manager form of government, been ahead of the curve," LaVecchia said. "They rank up there with the best."

Only seven men have served as county manager in the 77 years since the form of government was implemented. Edward Beck, who served from 1952 to 1977, held the position longest. Current county manager Virgil Hazelett, who has served in the position since 1992, is the second-longest tenured. All seven were civil engineers – a fact that
helped each navigate the challenging landscape of infrastructure demands for a growing urban county, Wikstrom wrote.

In the same vein, Hinson credited a little-recognized decision early in the county manager form of government that appointed the county manager to sit – with voting privileges – on the four-member Planning Commission (at the time there was no Three Chopt District).

"He had the deciding vote, if needed," Hinson said. "And the changes in this time period were very significant."

The county manager's influence as a professional on a body of appointed officials undoubtedly factored into some of the critical land use recommendations and decisions being made by the commission, Hinson said.

To Hinson, it was no surprise that Henrico chose to be unique, and a leader, in the way it organized its government.

"I've always called it the Henrico way – the culture of Henrico and its citizens," he said. "History has proven that they always do things that seem to be – and history proves it out – the right decisions."
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Governor vetoes Republicans’ ‘educational choice’ legislation


Gov. Terry McAuliffe on Thursday vetoed several bills that Republicans say would have increased school choice but McAuliffe said would have undermined public schools.

Two bills, House Bill 1400 and Senate Bill 1240, would have established the Board of Virginia Virtual School as an agency in the executive branch of state government to oversee online education in kindergarten through high school. Currently, online courses fall under the Virginia Board of Education. > Read more.

School supply drive, emergency fund to help Baker E.S. students and faculty


Individuals and organizations wanting to help George F. Baker Elementary School students and staff recover from a March 19 fire at the school now have two ways to help: make a monetary donation or donate items of school supplies.

The weekend fire caused significant smoke-and-water damage to classroom supplies and student materials at the school at 6651 Willson Road in Eastern Henrico.

For tax-deductible monetary donations, the Henrico Education Foundation has created the Baker Elementary School Emergency School Supply Fund. > Read more.

Nominations open for 2017 IMPACT Award


ChamberRVA is seeking nominees for the annual IMPACT Award, which honors the ways in which businesses are making an impact in the RVA Region economy and community and on their employees.

Nominees must be a for-profit, privately-held business located within ChamberRVA's regional footprint: the counties of Charles City, Chesterfield, Goochland, Hanover, Henrico, New Kent and Powhatan; the City of Richmond; and the Town of Ashland. > Read more.

Business in brief


Cushman & Wakefield | Thalhimer announces the sale of the former Friendly’s restaurant property located at 5220 Brook Road in Henrico County. Brook Road V, LLC purchased the 3,521-square-foot former restaurant property situated on 0.92 acres from O Ice, LLC for $775,000 as an investment. Bruce Bigger of Cushman & Wakefield | Thalhimer handled the sale negotiations on behalf of the seller. > Read more.

Water system repairs to prompt lane closures Wednesday near Gayton, John Rolfe


Work to repair a leaking water main or valve will require lane closures beginning at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday, March 22 near Gayton Road and John Rolfe Parkway.

Westbound Gayton’s left turning lane and left through lane will be closed. Westbound traffic will be shifted to the right through lane. Eastbound Gayton’s left through lane will be closed at John Rolfe. Eastbound traffic will be shifted to the right through lane. > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

CAT Theatre to present ‘When There’s A Will’


CAT Theatre and When There’s A Will director Ann Davis recently announced the cast for the dark comedy which will be performed May 26 through June 3.

The play centers around a family gathering commanded by the matriarch, Dolores, to address their unhappiness with Grandmother’s hold on the clan’s inheritance and her unreasonable demands on her family.

Pat Walker will play the part of Dolores Whitmore, with Graham and Florine Whitmore played by Brent Deekens and Brandy Samberg, respectively. > Read more.

 

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CAT Theatre, 319 N. Wilkinson Rd., will present “Jeeves Intervenes,” a comedic farce, March 17 to April 1. “Jeeves Intervenes” is a delightful romp full of deception and disguise based on the original P.G. Wodehouse stories. Starring Scott Bergman in the title role. Tickets are $23 in advance and $25 at the door (opening night is $33 to $35). For a complete performance schedule and to purchase tickets, visit http://www.cattheatre.com. Full text

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