Top Teachers: Samuel Turner

Growing up, Samuel Turner always assumed that he would follow the family military tradition and end up in a job in which he designed or built airplanes, tanks and helicopters, or perhaps joined the Military Corps of Engineers.

But a Saturday morning during his senior year of high school changed all that.

Spending time at the Nottoway County home of his English teacher, the late John B. Cyrus, completely changed his perspective, said Turner. It was Cyrus – along with other teachers and principals he admired – who gave him an appreciation of the opportunity teachers have to make a difference in young lives.

Looking back, Turner said, he always had people around him who provided advice and “taught me a different way to view things.”

His sister and brother both challenged and nurtured him, and he noted that both have had successful military careers, in addition to becoming teachers in their respective fields.  

As a teacher of pre-engineering, technology, and 21st-century learning, Turner (who taught at Short Pump Middle School before Holman opened) said that among his biggest challenges are the misperceptions that exist about gender in that curriculum. He has found it especially rewarding, as a result, to watch female students blossom.

He described one such student who began besting older students in competitions as a sixth-grader, delivered winning campaign speeches as a seventh-grader, moved on to leadership positions in TSA (Technology Student Association) and “almost single-handedly increased the female interest in engineering, technology and TSA.” Recently, he said, he was honored to provide letters of reference as she applied to schools of higher education.

Another challenge of teaching technology, he said, is what he calls the “influences of the modern Information Age.”

While modern electronic marvels save time and provide instant information and entertainment, he said, they also foster a perception that technology is the answer to everything, “and that success is just a keypunch away. 

“I try to instill in the students,” said Turner, “that no matter what electronic gadgets we have at our disposal, they are [simply] tools . . .The greatest computer or tool ever made sits squarely on their shoulders – and its potential is limitless.”  

He also strives to find special and unique things about what interests each student, and to teach “every student in every class like they are preparing to go to Harvard.”

Seeing his students embrace new ideas and apply their classroom lessons in exciting ways at technology competitions, he says, is “marvelous to behold.”

Turner succeeds at getting to know every student, according to parents, because his work day often lasts from 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.

“His door is always open,” marveled one parent. “Kids will hang out in his classroom both before and after school, when they need a place to ‘just be’, or need a shoulder to lean on. . . He teaches so much more than just technology. He welcomes all children, and finds a way to connect with each one.”
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Crime Stoppers’ Crime of the Week: May 22, 2017

This week, Crime Stoppers needs your help to find the suspects vandalizing Dominion Energy equipment in Varina.

On Feb. 6 and May 3, someone shot at equipment belonging to Dominion Energy. Both incidents occurred near Kingsland Road between the hours of midnight and 3 a.m. The equipment was damaged, causing a major inconvenience to customers who lost power and posing a safety hazard to people nearby. > Read more.

A place to excel

It's no surprise when a business deal begins to take shape during a golf outing.

Perhaps less common is the business deal that percolates during a youth football practice. But such was the case for Varina District Supervisor Tyrone Nelson.

During a visit to former Varina High School football star Michael Robinson's football camp, Nelson was discussing with Robinson his excitement for the new Varina Library, whose opening last June was at that time forthcoming.
> Read more.

Business in brief


Long & Foster Real Estate recently named Amy Enoch as the new manager of its Tuckahoe office. Enoch brings more than 15 years of real estate expertise to her new position, and she most recently led Long & Foster’s Village of Midlothian office. Enoch has served in both sales and management positions during her tenure at Long & Foster. Prior to her real estate career, Enoch worked in information technology and hospitality. She is a graduate of Radford University, where she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in economics, English and history. Enoch has also received the designation of Graduate, Realtor Institute (GRI) from the National Association of Realtors, and this showcases her expertise in the fundamentals of real estate. > Read more.

Henrico recognized as a 2017 ‘Playful City USA’ community


A national nonprofit organization, KaBOOM!, has selected Henrico County as a 2017 Playful City USA community. The organization encourages communities to bring fun and balanced activities to children every day.

Henrico's selection is joined by the city of Richmond, town of Ashland, as well as the counties of Charles City, Chesterfield, Goochland, Hanover, New Kent and Powhatan. All of the localities make up the first region completely recognized through Playful City USA. > Read more.

Gallagher Foundation serves more than 14,000 teens in first year


In its first year, The Cameron K. Gallagher Foundation reached 14,000 teens through its programs from Spring 2016 to date. The foundation is dedicated to spreading positivity and erasing stigmas by educating and creating awareness on depression, anxiety and stress among teens. CKG delivers programs at schools, community events and its West End office.

“Students are in need of the information in the workshops, whether they know it or not, and they aren’t getting it anywhere else,” said Beth Curry, Director of Health and Wellness at The Steward School. > Read more.

Henrico Business Bulletin Board

May 2017
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Full Circle Grief Center will host Round Up the Family 5K and Fun Run at 8:30 a.m. at Deep Run Park. The event includes field games, crafts, music from DJ Tony T, live performances and character visits from Studio Performance Academy, raffles and more. Registration fees are $10 for the Fun Run and $20 for the 5K. For details, visit http://www.runsignup.com/roundup. Full text

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