Roads vote helped county shape its destiny

Parham Road is one of the county’s first main secondary roads.
Nearly 80 years ago, in one of the most important elections in Henrico County’s history, voters cast their ballots without electing anyone to office.

But their decision that day – one that passed by a margin of 1,842 votes to 1,132 – helped change the course of Henrico’s future by making it unique among nearly all other Virginia localities in one very critical way.

The vote authorized Henrico to opt out of the newly created state-operated road maintenance program, which was implemented in 1932 as part of the Byrd Act to relieve localities of such maintenance duties. At the time, nearly all Virginia localities opted to give up the control of their secondary road systems to the state. But Henrico voters did not, and the county’s landscape today is due in large part to their decision – even if they may not have been able to predict that at the time.

“I don’t think anybody could have foreseen how important it would be 70, 80 years later,” said Harvey Hinson, a longtime Henrico administrator who retired as a deputy county manager several years ago.

That decision ranks No. 8 on the Henrico Citizen’s list of the most significant events in Henrico’s 400-year history.

Today, the county’s Public Works department maintains more than 1,300 miles of county roadways (all roads in the county that do not carry a route number) with quarterly payments of about $3 million apiece from the state. Arlington County is the only other in Virginia that opted out of the state program in 1932 and has remained out.

So while other counties must present their roadway requests to VDOT officials and convince them of their needs – a process that is subject to state studies and funding and one that typically takes years – Henrico has no such bureaucratic tape to cut through. It can decide how to spend its money immediately.

By eliminating that state influence, Henrico gave itself a head start on development – and a competitive advantage over other localities, according to University of Richmond economics professor George Hoffer.

“What it did is that it gave us the flexibility that virtually no other county in Virginia had, to avoid the bureaucracy – and, if you had people with some foresight – the ability to put the resources where they could do the most good,” said Hoffer, a local transportation expert and a Henrico resident since 1950.

A prime example of the impact that flexibility provided Henrico occurred in the mid-1990s, when Motorola and Siemens were seeking a location to build a giant semiconductor facility. The companies sought a quick turnaround time for their project but required a significant site with infrastructure in place.

Henrico’s Elko Tract in Sandston satisfied their requirements but was miles from utility connections and had no roads. Constructing parkways and running water and sewer lines across empty fields and through wooded acres might have taken several years to complete through VDOT and other state agencies – too long for the companies. But since Henrico could control those elements, time was not an issue. The county spent $43 million to complete the effort in less than a year, and the semiconductor facility brought several thousand new jobs with it.

“Henrico’s in a position. . . to sit down in a meeting with that prospect and begin the meeting by saying, ‘All of your questions are going to be answered in this room. You don’t have to leave here to get your questions answered,’” Hinson said. “It puts you in a whole different light with someone who you’re discussing a major investment with in your county.”

That’s the type of economic development victory county officials might not have been able to imagine in the 1930s and ‘40s. But by the time Bill LaVecchia arrived in Henrico in 1959 – rounding out a four-person planning department – county officials were starting to grasp the ways in which controlling their own roads could serve future growth.

“I think they were beginning to see how it could,” recalled LaVecchia, who spent more than three decades with the county, retiring in 1992 after eight years as county manager.

In 1959, then-County Manager Ed Beck told county administrators of his vision for Henrico.

“He said, ‘We are a bedroom county for the city of Richmond. I want us to be a county that’s standing on its own two feet,’” LaVecchia said. “So we started planning our land use plan and industrial areas based on roads that we had and roads that we were planning. Every time we put a [road] on that land use plan, we were looking for how that corridor would provide us with more commercial and industrial growth. In 1959, 1960, we were beginning to lay the framework for the county that has grown all up to the present time.

“It’s next to impossible to control where growth is going, in either a city or county. But in Henrico, since they maintain and plan and control their roads, they are able to control their own destiny pretty well. Without those roads, most of these big developments that have occurred in Henrico County just would not be able to happen.”

Among those roads are many of the most frequently traveled in the county: Parham Road, Laburnum Avenue, Glenside Drive, Hilliard Road, Ridgefield Parkway, John Rolfe Parkway, Gaskins Road, Gayton Road.

For years, Henrico officials have lobbied the General Assembly to increase the rate of reimbursement that Henrico receives for its road maintenance. State code designated that any county larger than 100 square miles that chose to maintain its own road would be paid at a lower rate than any county smaller than 100 square miles. As a result, Arlington historically has received nearly twice as much state funding per lane mile as Henrico. In the current fiscal year, Henrico receives $9,101 per lane mile – or about $12 million, divided into quarterly payments – while Arlington receives $16,121 per lane mile.

Henrico, in fact, receives less per lane mile for its entire road system – including principal roads and minor arterial roads – than the state budgets for VDOT’s maintenance of small collector roads and local streets elsewhere in the state ($10,087).

A 2008 study by the General Assembly found that designating Henrico as an urban locality would cost the state an additional $8 million annually – more money than was available in the budget.

Despite apparently being short-changed by the state for years, Henrico has managed to thrive under the system anyway.

The most recent evidence will become apparent to citizens soon, as Henrico builds a $40-million intersection for Gayton Road at I-64 in the West End. The project, funded by a bond referendum, is the latest example of the county’s ability to address a transportation issue on its own, rather than having to wait for state help.

“Being more responsive to citizens, being able to put the roads in in a timely manner and being able to control the entire scheme, have been the critical elements in this balanced growth,” Hoffer said. “All of these roads have either nipped the congestion before it started or gotten control of it in a reasonable time.”
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HCPS wins national honor for overhaul of Code of Student Conduct, supports


Henrico County Public Schools recently was recognized by the National School Boards Association for a sweeping overhaul of the school division’s approach to student supports. HCPS was one of five large U.S. school systems recognized with a first-place honor in the 2017 Magna Awards, presented Saturday in Denver at the organization’s annual conference. The awards recognize school divisions and leaders “for taking bold and innovative steps to improve the lives of students and their communities,” according to the group.

The award recognizes Henrico Schools’ efforts of the past several years, from re-examining its policies to implementing more support systems. After a two-year conversation with the community through public hearings and other feedback, HCPS adopted a revised Code of Student Conduct for the 2015-16 school year. > Read more.

Environmentalists say budget hurts efforts to protect bay

Environmental groups are outraged at the Trump administration’s proposed funding cuts for Chesapeake Bay cleanup programs.

President Donald Trump’s budget plan, released last week, reduces the budget for the federal Environmental Protection Agency by 31 percent. That includes a $427 million in funding to address regional pollution, such as the Chesapeake Bay protection efforts. The proposed budget would eliminate funding for the EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Program, which received $73 million from the federal government in 2016. > Read more.

Glen Allen ES principal receives REB Award


Melissa Halquist-Pruden, principal of Henrico County’s Glen Allen Elementary School, earned the 2016-17 REB Award for Distinguished Educational Leadership. The Community Foundation presents the award to four principals annually – one each from the school systems of Henrico, Chesterfield and Hanover counties and one from the city of Richmond schools.

The award recognizes principals who go beyond the day-to-day demands of their jobs to create an exceptional educational environment. The award stresses management and communication skills, and the ability to inspire, encourage and advocate for the school. > Read more.

Grant to help Hermitage H.S. upgrade CTE program equipment


Governor Terry McAuliffe announced recently that Henrico County’s Hermitage H.S. will be among 16 high schools and technical centers statewide to receive a grant to upgrade equipment for career and technical education (CTE) programs.

The program gives priority to challenged schools, Governor's STEM Academies and Governor's Health Science Academies. Each school or center will receive $37,500 to purchase new equipment and make other necessary improvements. At Hermitage, the funds will be used for precision machining equipment. > Read more.

Virginia raises a toast to George Washington’s whiskey


George Washington is recognized as the father of our country, but with a bill signed into law by Gov. Terry McAuliffe, Washington also will be recognized under another title – distiller of Virginia’s official liquor.

SB 1261, sponsored by Sen. Adam Ebbin of Alexandria, adds a “state spirit” to the list of the commonwealth’s official emblems and designations and crowns George Washington’s rye whiskey with the title.

The bill, which McAuliffe signed last week, highlights George Washington’s contributions to the culture of Virginia as “a native son of Virginia born on February 22, 1732, in Pope’s Creek”; “the first American president, commander of the Continental Army, and president of the Constitutional Convention”; and “a model statesman ... universally acknowledged as the father of our nation.” > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

Metro Diner to open second Henrico location


Metro Diner, a comfort food concept, will open its second Henrico location next month. The company is accepting job applications for its Libbie Place location at 5626 West Broad Street. The diner concept, known for its fried chicken and waffles, meatloaf, and shrimp and grits, will bring 100 new jobs to the region as it plans to open its doors in April.

The 3,500-square-foot diner located in the Libbie Place Shopping Center will seat more than 100 and serve classic comfort food staples with a twist, such as fried chicken and waffles topped with strawberry butter and a stuffed challah bread French toast with strawberry and blueberry compote. > Read more.

 

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Innsbrook will host its 8th annual St. Paddy’s Palooza from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. There will be live music all day long, as well as Celtic dancers, the Henrico Federal Credit Union hot air balloon, and a Kids Zone with face painting, climbing wall, petting zoo, pony rides and more. Festive green beverages – for adults and kids – are available, as well as many food options. And, as always, the main attraction – watch volunteers have their heads shaved to raise money for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, an organization that supports finding cures for childhood cancer. For details, visit http://www.innsbrook.com. For more information about the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, visit http://www.stbaldricks.org/events/richmond. Full text

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