Radiation levels not dangerous, Virginia officials say

As radiation readings at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan worsened Sunday, health officials said Virginians are not in any danger.

Monitoring systems across the commonwealth “continue to show no levels of public health concern,” according to the Virginia Department of Health.

State Health Commissioner Karen Remley said the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has been monitoring the air in the United States since a March 11 earthquake and tsunami devastated northeast Japan and crippled nuclear plants there.

“As a result of the incident with the nuclear power plant in Japan, several EPA air monitors have detected very low levels of radioactive material in the U.S.,” Remley said. “To date, none of Virginia’s multiple monitoring systems has detected a level of radioactive material that would pose a public-health concern.”

Remley said the EPA has found “elevated levels of radioactive material in rainwater in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts.” But that had been expected, “since radiation is known to travel in the atmosphere,” she said.

“However, we are not seeing that in any of the monitoring data for the state.”

Even so, the Virginia Department of Health is taking steps to address concerns in Virginia:

The VDH was scheduled to conduct routine quarterly radiological health division monitoring and is moving up that schedule by one week to begin on Monday [March 28]. This routine monitoring checks radiation levels in air, drinking water, vegetation and milk at multiple sites throughout the state.

The department is working with the state’s laboratory to implement the proposed baseline testing plan for rainwater, drinking water, vegetation and milk. Further testing will follow if warranted by the baseline testing and ongoing monitoring. This is a standard VDH response when routine monitoring indicates a need to test further.

The VDH is advising residents that the state’s drinking water supplies are safe but that, “out of an abundance of caution,” Virginians should avoid using rainwater collected in cisterns as drinking water.

Besides the VDH’s routine radiological monitoring, studies are being conducted in Virginia by the EPA, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Dominion Virginia Power and the U.S. military.

The VDH also continues to advise the state’s secretary of health and human resources, Bill Hazel, and Gov. Bob McDonnell on the status of monitoring and levels of radiation detected.

For more information about radiation monitoring in Virginia, visit http://www.vdh.virginia.gov.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

State Police urge motorists to #MoveOver during Memorial Day weekend

Memorial Day signifies the official start of summer, and Virginia State Police officials are urging motorists to "do what’s right when they see lights" and move over.

The “Move Over” law is a lifesaving law intended to protect public safety professionals and highway workers who help to maintain the safety of the Commonwealth’s roads. State Police are using the #MoveOver hashtag on social media to promote the law. > Read more.

Henrico to hold June 8 open house on Route 5 Corridor/Marion Hill study

The Henrico County Planning Department will hold an open house Thursday, June 8 for residents and other members of the public to provide input for a study of the Route 5 Corridor/Marion Hill areas.

The open house will be held from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Varina Area Library, 1875 New Market Road. The meeting’s informal structure will allow the public to attend at their convenience and to ask questions and discuss the study one on one with Planning staff. > Read more.

Henrico real estate staying strong despite low inventory

The Henrico real estate market has been relatively strong for the past month, despite a lower amount of inventory, according to data from Long and Foster Real Estate.

In the past month, 408 homes have been sold in Henrico, which is 2 percent less than were sold in the same timeframe in 2016.

Last year the median sale prices for Henrico homes was $219,975, whereas this month it's up to $232,500, a 6 percent increase. Which means half of the homes in Henrico are priced above $232,500 and half are priced below. > Read more.

Smither named director of Henrico’s Department of Finance

Henrico County Manager John A. Vithoulkas has appointed Edward N. “Ned” Smither Jr. to serve as director of the Department of Finance, effective July 1.

Smither has served Henrico since 2013 as director of the Accounting Division in Finance. He will succeed Eugene H. Walter, who has delayed his retirement until June 30 to ensure an orderly transition within the department.
> Read more.

State honors EMS officials this week

There were nearly 1.5 million emergency medical services calls and 4,063 incidents per day in Virginia just last year.

This week, May 21-27, declared as National EMS week by Gov. Terry McAuliffe, recognizes the more than 34,000 EMS personnel and 631 agencies in the state and commends their efforts and commitment to Commonwealth citizens.
> Read more.

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May 2017
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Tuckahoe Library will host “Full STEAM Ahead!” for ages 8+ from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Explore, create and invent at interactive stations featuring littleBits electronic building block sets, Makey Makeys, cool experiments and more. Learn science, engineering and art concepts through hands-on activities. Hosted by the West End Teen Advisory Board. Register online at http://www.henricolibrary.org. Full text

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