Henrico County VA

Off the treadmill

‘Nowhere’ film inspires discussion at Godwin
A third-grader with stomach aches. A sleep-deprived high school student suffering from stress-related symptoms. A teacher frustrated with her job and leaving the profession. A psychotherapist who treats anorexic and self-abusing teens. The grieving parents of a 13-year-old who killed herself.

What do they have in common?

All are reluctant participants in the race to nowhere.

More than three hundred parents, students and teachers turned out to watch a documentary film by the same name Nov. 17 at Godwin High School, sponsored by the school's PTSA. The film was followed by a forum that featured a panel composed of students, teachers, a guidance counselor and an admissions director. The discussion was
moderated by Godwin's principal, Beth Armbruster.

Godwin parent Charles Moncure – who underwrote the cost of showing the film after seeing it at Deep Run H.S. last year – said he got behind the effort because his 15-year-old daughter is "living 'the Race.'

"[She's] staying up until 1:30 or two a.m. doing homework for AP classes, then getting up at seven to go to school," says Moncure. "We don’t know how to get her off the treadmill."

Epidemic
The film traces the development of what it calls America's achievement culture, from the stepped-up pace of education following the 1957 launch of Sputnik, to the 1983 publication of A Nation at Risk and the results-oriented focus brought on by No Child Left Behind and the standards movement.

It's a culture that has led to an overemphasis on rote learning and test results, say educators, at the expense of teaching children the ability to think creatively and conceptually, to act independently, and to solve problems.

The demand that so much content be taught has led to a loss of good programs in favor of test preparation and has spawned an epidemic of cheating – not to mention a nation of exhausted, overscheduled and overwhelmed children.

"Too many childhoods have been taken over by test scores, performance and résumé-building," writes Denise Miller, chair of the Parents Council of Commonwealth Parenting, which sponsored a viewing of "Race to Nowhere" at University of Richmond in October.

Citing increases in depression, prescription drug abuse, and stress-induced illness among youth, Miller emphasized in a recent Richmond Times-Dispatch commentary that children today are loaded with too much homework, which deprives them of time for the unstructured play, socializing and family time that they need for healthy development.
Yet homework has been shown to be unrelated to achievement in elementary school and only negligibly related to achievement in middle school.

As Dr. Wendy Mogel, author of Blessings of a Skinned Knee, points out in the film, “I’m afraid our children are going to sue us for stealing their childhoods.”

‘Bleeding underneath’
Throughout the film, students as young as eight years old describe stomach aches, headaches and other stress symptoms related to the pressure they feel from schoolwork.

Vicki Abeles, a California parent who made the film after seeing her three children suffer from what she calls "the relentless pressure to perform," says that Race to Nowhere was inspired by "a series of wake-up calls."

"I wanted to give my kids opportunities I didn't have growing up," says Abeles in the film. "I didn't think when I had kids that the only time I'd see them would be 20 minutes at dinner.

"How did we get to a place where our families had so little time together?"

The film demonstrates repeatedly that children and their families are not the only casualties of 'the race'; educators, mental health professionals and the public at large are also affected.

One teacher in the film speaks tearfully of her decision to resign after finding the demands of her school district to push content and test scores too much to bear.

What she wants to teach her students, she says, are life skills and job skills: how to work in a group, how to think critically, and how to solve problems.

"But those get pushed aside," the teacher says. "Good programs are cut or done away with to teach to the test.

"I wanted to get kids to love learning, but from day one it was very clear that that was not what the district wanted me to do. "

Another educator, who teaches doctors- and dentists-to-be, notes that her students lack many necessary thinking skills – but feel entitled to know what's going to be on tests.

If all they are learning in school is how to cram and fill in blanks on tests, the teacher wonders, what will these future doctors and dentists do when confronted with disease – or anything else that doesn't follow the script?

A psychotherapist in the film describes treating anorexics and "cutters" who are accomplished students but feel swamped with school work and get as little as six hours of sleep a night – an amount that is grossly inadequate for still-growing teens.

"They look good on the surface," says the therapist of her patients, "but they're bleeding underneath."

The film is dedicated to 13-year-old Devon Marvin, who committed suicide one weekend after displaying none of the usual symptoms of depression. Her anguished mother indicates in the film that an F grade on a math test was the only possible explanation for her daughter's distress.

A straight-A student, Devon had been "really torn up" by the F, says her mother. "

A stupid math grade," she repeats dully, with a bewildered shake of her head.

Discussion
In the discussion that followed the film's showing, Godwin Principal Beth Armbruster noted that every faculty member at the school had watched the documentary.

"We've really marinated on it," said Armbruster, pointing out that one response so far had been to build in some play time on PSAT day that included team-building exercises and "silly games." The play time was so successful, she said, that some have suggested it be scheduled once a quarter.

When an audience member posed the question, "Is the Godwin principal prepared to advocate for no homework in Henrico County schools?", Armbruster replied that while she would not advocate for no homework, she would promote no homework over breaks. In fact, she added, "We've already done that."

A parent in the audience asked Deanna Hudson, director of school counseling, why counselors weren't doing more to discourage students from overloading their schedules.

But teachers on the panel agreed with Hudson that the pressure to take heavy course loads is often self-induced, as students strive to pack as many classes as they can into their schedule.

"I've had four kids this year drop an AP class for a study hall," replied Hudson, noting that she reminded the students as they made the change, "Didn't we talk about this [overload] last spring?"

David Lesesne, dean of admissions at Randolph Macon College, spoke also to the issue of self-imposed pressure. Too many students, said Lesesne, take the attitude, "I have to do the max. I have to be perfect." He advised the students in the audience to approach the college search not as "What's the ideal school?” or “What window sticker do I want (on my car)?" but as "What's a good fit for me?"

"Don't think there's only one dream school," said Lesesne. "And don't enter the [college application] process thinking everything is riding on this."

Hudson drew laughter as she backed up Lesesne by saying, "I've been married twice, so I don't believe there's one soulmate out there for someone. The same thing goes for college."

Lesesne added, "And when you get those letters back from colleges, remember, it is not a measure of your self-worth." A colleague of his at an Ivy League school told Lesesne that 80 percent of applicants could do the work; but schools are forced to turn away strong applicants because they simply don't have the seats.

Several panel members also reiterated the theme that students should push themselves less, enjoy themselves more, focus on genuine learning over grades, and pursue subjects that interest them – advice echoed fervently in the film by Matt Goldman, co-founder of the Blue School in Manhattan.

"Kids come to the table with this love of life and love of learning," says Goldman, who is also founder and CEO of the Blue Man Group.

"How about we not take it out of them?

Read the Citizen and HenricoCitizen.com for details about a Jan. 18 event related to "Race to Nowhere." For details about the film, visit racetonowhere.com.
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Community

Tournament supports adoption efforts

Among participants at the Seventh Annual Coordinators2Inc Golf Tournament and awards luncheon Oct. 3 were (from left) Rebecca Ricardo, C2 Inc executive director; Kevin Derr, member of the winning foursome; Sharon Richardson, C2 Inc founder; and Frank Ridgway and Jon King, members of the winning foursome.

Held at The Crossings Golf Club, the tournament will benefit placement of children from Virginia's foster care system into permanent families through Coordinators2. > Read more.

A.C. Moore to host winter craft day for kids

Event will help kick of Marine Corps' 'Toys for Tots' campaign
All 140 A.C. Moore locations will serve as drop-off centers this year for the Marine Toys for Tots Foundation, and all toys collected will stay in the local communities served by the stores in which they are donated.

On Saturday, Nov. 15, the Willow Lawn location will kick off the month-long program by hosting a "Make & Take" craft event for kids. Children ages six and older will be able to make a craft and take it home with them. Representatives from the Marines will be in-store to teach customers about the Toys for Tots program. A.C. Moore team members will be on site to help with the crafts. > Read more.

CCC seeks donations for food pantry

Commonwealth Catholic Charities is in desperate need of food donations for its community food pantry that serves the region’s low-income families, according to officials with the Henrico-based nonprofit.

After moving into its new location this past summer, the agency has dedicated a larger space for the pantry but the shelves are practically empty.

“As we head into the holidays and the weather turns colder, the need for food becomes even more critical, but unfortunately our cupboards are nearly bare,” said Jay Brown, the agency’s director for the division of housing services. “Donations of food will allow us help provide.” > Read more.

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Entertainment

Restaurant watch

Find out how your favorite dining establishments fared during their most recent inspections by the Virginia Department of Health. > Read more.

‘Sizing Up!’ opens at Cultural Arts Center

The Cultural Arts Center unveils a new exhibit – "Sizing Up!" – Nov. 20-Jan. 18 in the Gumenick Family Gallery.

Artist Chuck Larivey has spent the past three years "sizing up" – creating large-scale oil paintings that are designed to engage their viewers in a monumental way by using size to captivate them and make them a part of the artistic experience.

The exhibit is appropriate for all ages and is free and open to the public at the center, located at 2880 Mountain Road in Glen Allen. > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


Are you still looking for some unique holiday gifts? There are hundreds of great options your family and friends will love at the Holly Spree on Stuart Avenue, Vintage Holiday Show and New Bridge Academy’s annual Christmas Bazaar. Shopping can be stressful so some relaxing activities can be found in Henrico this weekend as well, including “Richmond’s Finest” at The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen, the “Nutcracker Sweet” at Moody Middle School and a jazz concert at the Henrico Theatre. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

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