New law requires anti-bullying training

Thousands of students in schools across the country are subjected to bullying by their peers on a daily basis. Now Virginia is doing something about the problem.

During its 2012 session, the General Assembly passed legislation requiring teachers and other school personnel to receive training on anti-bullying tactics. Gov. Bob McDonnell has signed the legislation into law; it will take effect in July.

Lawmakers approved two identical measures – Senate Bill 271 and House Bill 504. They will require the Virginia Center for School Safety to provide employees in Virginia schools with training on how to stop bullying. State officials say such training has become necessary as bullying has become more common.

“Recent school safety audits conducted by the Virginia Center for School Safety show that it is a top concern of students in elementary, middle and high schools,” said Donna Michaelis, manager of campus and school safety at the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services, which operates the center.

“Approximately one-quarter of school principals agreed or strongly agreed that bullying is a problem at their school.”

Delegate Rosalyn Dance, D-Petersburg, introduced HB 504 with support from McDonnell. After being shown a draft of the bill by Virginia Secretary of Public Safety Marla Graff Decker, Dance agreed to sponsor the legislation.

“Having read the bill and reviewing the negative impact of bullying around the country – verbal and physical abuse that had led to death from murder or suicide – I knew this was a situation waiting for a voice to speak to the issue here in Virginia,” Dance said.

She said the training will give teachers a better understanding of what bullying is. They will learn how to spot behaviors (by both the victim and the perpetrator) associated with bullying. Moreover, school employees will learn intervention and prevention techniques.

The training also will cover alternative punishments for those who bully, other than expulsion or suspension.

At the General Assembly’s request, the Virginia Department of Education last year conducted a study to determine whether policy changes were needed to combat bullying in schools. This year’s legislation was passed in response to that study.

Michaelis said the anti-bullying training also will include information on the rising problem of cyberbullying. Online bullying – using social media, cellphones and other technology – and has led to suicides in some parts of the country.

The Virginia Center for School Safety currently offers a wide range of courses for teachers to attend regarding bullying prevention, conflict management and other topics. It will combine the new training into existing programs.

“The center offers approximately 50-75 trainings per year as well as two major conferences targeting school and campus safety professionals,” Michaelis said. “It is anticipated that they can incorporate aspects of these practices into existing anti-bullying training.”

While the center will train school personnel on how to deal with bullying, everyone – including parents and students – must be involved in addressing the problem, officials say.

“It is the responsibility of school divisions to provide training to teachers and all staff on preventing bullying and establishing a school climate of safety and freedom from bullying,” said Cynthia Cave, director of student services at the Virginia Department of Education.

“We provide technical assistance and on-site professional development activities to individual schools, school divisions and parents regarding specific issues concerning bullying.”

The new law underscores the importance of preventing bullying and bullying-related suicides among young people.

“Everyone has a right to be treated with dignity and respect and should not have to live in fear of someone harming them just because of the way they look, act or view the world we live in,” Dance said.

On the web
You can find the Virginia Department of Education’s report about anti-bullying policies in the state’s public schools at http://tinyurl.com/bullying-study

The new law mandating anti-bullying training for school personnel is at http://tinyurl.com/bullying-law
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

RVA Polar Plunge raises $40k for Special Olympics


More than 300 participants took the plunge for charity Feb. 25 at The Shops at Willow Lawn, raising $40,000 for the Special Olympics of Virginia as part of the 2017 RVA Polar Plunge Fest. Participants jumped into frigid water as part of the event, having raised money through donations leading up to the event.

“At Special Olympics Virginia, our vision is to inspire the first unified generation; a generation of people who respectfully include each other in the school, in the workplace, in the community,” said Rick Jeffrey, Special Olympics Virginia President. “Plunging this past Saturday included people with intellectual disabilities and those without; people of all ages, genders, races and religions; students and teachers; doctors and lawyers; military and law enforcement; one for all; all for one." > Read more.

Fundraiser bags more than $50k


CancerLINC's 11th annual "It’s in the Bag" event raised more than $50,000. The event, presented by Virginia Cancer Institute, was held at The Westin Richmond in Henrico Feb. 2 and was attended by more than 200 people.

“It's in the Bag” included handbag designer Thaddeus DuBois and his family from Syracuse, Ind. DuBois brought four handcrafted handbags, which were auctioned off and raised more than $4,000. Three autographed handbags from “Sex and the City” star Sarah Jessica Parker also brought funds. > Read more.

A date with states


Above, Varina’s Andre Watkins drives to the basket during the Blue Devils’ 52-51 win against Hampton in the Group 5A third-place game at Hermitage High School Feb. 25. Below, Tyrese Jenkins drives to the basket during the game. The Blue Devils (21-6 on the season), who earlier last month defeated Hermitage, 53-34, to earn a spot in the 5A state tournament, next will face Albemarle in that tournament. It is the program’s first trip to the state tournament since 2001 and first under fourth-year coach Andrew Lacey, who has turned around a team that was 6-14 during his first season. > Read more.

Future public servants observe lawmaking firsthand


For the past two months, they showed up every day at the state Capitol, dressed in matching blazers and carrying pen and paper at the ready – the next generation of public servants carefully observing their superiors.

These young adults are known as pages. They are middle school and high school students from around Virginia who assist in everyday tasks at the General Assembly to experience firsthand how the legislative process works.

The program dates as far back as 1850, when the one page who worked was paid $2 a day. > Read more.

CRLC seeks donations for Malvern Hill Farm


The Capital Region Land Conservancy (CRLC) is seeking to raise $100,000 in 30 days to cover due diligence and closing costs associated with the historic Malvern Hill Farm. These include boundary survey, Phase I ESA, title search and insurance, recording fees, taxes, and legal work as well as a Section 106 review.

CRLC is scheduled to close on the purchase of the property May 31, and is asking community members to help support the site's acquisition. All donations will help CRLC leverage $1 million in matching funds. > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


Given the warm weather lately, Saturday’s RVA Polar Plunge Winter Fest, benefiting Special Olympics Virginia, might actually be enjoyable! Other weekend events you’re sure to enjoy include the 14th annual Richmond Kids Expo at the Richmond Raceway Complex, the Richmond Symphony and The Taters in concert at The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen, and the Richmond Ballet Minds in Motion Team XXL performing at the Henrico Theatre. This is also the last weekend to check out HATTheatre’s production of “Bill W. and Dr. Bob.” For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

 

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Jewish Family Theatre will present “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” March 1-11 at the Weinstein Jewish Community Center. Set to an engaging cornucopia of musical styles, from country-western and calypso to bubble gum rock and rock ‘n roll, this Old Testament tale emerges both timely and timeless. Enjoy dinner with the show on March 8. Tickets are $20 for JCC members, $30 for nonmembers and $15 for seniors and students. For a complete performance schedule and to purchase tickets, visit http://www.weinsteinjcc.org. Full text

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