New law aims to improve breast cancer detection

Beginning July 1, women getting mammograms will learn whether they have dense breast tissue that could hide cancer. This is due to recent legislation that addresses the test’s failure to detect certain cancers in women with dense breast tissue.

Under the new law, if radiologists conducting mammograms find dense breast tissue, they must send the patient a letter noting that fact – and that dense breast tissue can hide cancer. The letter will urge women to talk to their physicians about the matter.

The new “patient inform” law resulted from efforts by a breast cancer survivor, Cathryn Tatusko of Fairfax County, with support from an aptly named national awareness organization called Are You Dense.

JoAnn Pushkin, co-founder of Are You Dense, said she was pleased that Virginia has enacted the new law.

“I am thrilled that women of Virginia will join those in Connecticut and Texas in receiving this life-saving information about their breast health,” Pushkin said.

During its 2012 session, the General Assembly approved two identical measures addressing the issue: Senate Bill 544, sponsored by Sen. John Edwards, D-Roanoke; and House Bill 83, introduced by Delegate Robert Orrock, R-Thornburg. Both bills passed unanimously, and Gov. Bob McDonnell signed them into law.

Currently, after a woman gets a mammogram, her referring physician receives a report from her radiologist with a statement on her breast density. However, the patient receives a letter without medical jargon that simply says whether abnormalities were detected. Women can ask for the more detailed report, but most don’t.

Studies also show that only one in 10 women learn about breast density from their doctors.

Most women have a combination of dense and fatty breast tissue. On a mammogram, dense tissue appears white and fatty tissue appears gray.

Cancers also show up as white on a mammogram. As a result, they can be hidden by dense tissue. In contrast, against fatty tissue, cancers stand out and can be more readily spotted.

Thus, women who have very dense breast tissue have a greater risk that their cancer could be overlooked. According to many studies, cancers can be obscured more than 40 percent of the time, depending on the degree of breast density.

Tatusko approached Orrock and asked him to propose the legislation. She did so after her own ordeal with breast cancer.

Tatusko’s dense breast tissue had masked the large tumor on the yearly mammogram she had just five months before being diagnosed with breast cancer. Even a mammogram she received the day of her diagnosis failed to show the advanced-stage cancer. As of February, Tatusko is considered cancer-free.

Are You Dense was founded by another breast cancer survivor, Nancy Cappello of Connecticut. Cappello persuaded her home state to pass a “patient inform” law in 2009, and she helped women in Texas pass legislation that same year. Fourteen states besides Virginia considered such proposals this year. A federal bill is also pending.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Glen Allen HS student earns playwriting residency


A play written by a Glen Allen High School junior was selected, along with seven others, to be performed professionally this summer through a nationally acclaimed Virginia high school playwriting program.

47B, a play written by 16-year-old Glen Allen High school student Dominique Dowling, was chosen by New Voices for the Theater, a playwriting competition sponsored by the School of the Performing Arts in the Richmond Community, from a pool of more than 150 plays by high school students in the state. > Read more.

Missing Eastern Henrico man found dead

Henrico Police have found the body of a missing Eastern Henrico man.

The body of 25-year-old Taj Rashad Bullock, who was last seen June 10 in Eastern Henrico, was found June 20 in a wooded area in that part of the county. > Read more.

Henrico Schools to participate in USDA summer food service


Henrico County Public Schools, through its Division of School Nutrition Services, will participate in the 2017 Summer Food Service Program administered by the US Department of Agriculture. The program provides meals to students enrolled in Henrico Schools summer programs or in those run by the Henrico County Department of Recreation and Parks.

Food service will be provided Monday through Thursday each week. (All sites will be closed Tuesday, July 4, in recognition of Independence Day.) Breakfast will be served from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. Lunch will be served between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., but specific lunch times will vary depending on the site. > Read more.

Henrico to offer July 20 class on treating opioid overdoses with naloxone

The Henrico County Division of Fire and Henrico Area Mental Health & Developmental Services (MH/DS) will present a free class Thursday, July 20 on how to administer naloxone to potentially save the life of someone who has overdosed on opioids.

The Revive! Opioid Overdose and Naloxone Education for Virginia class will be held from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the MH/DS offices at 4825 S. Laburnum Ave. > Read more.

Crime Stoppers’ Crime of the Week – June 20, 2017


Police in Richmond are still looking for the person who they say robbed the FasMart at 2107 Semmes Avenue. Crime Stoppers needs the public's help identifying this suspect.

The robbery occurred at approximately 12:45 a.m. on Wednesday, May 31. The suspect entered the store pointing the weapon at the store clerk. As the suspect walked toward the counter, a second employee approached the suspect and grabbed the barrel of the weapon. > Read more.

Henrico Business Bulletin Board

June 2017
S M T W T F S
·
·
·
·
·

Calendar page

Classifieds

Place an Ad | More Classifieds

Calendar

Greater Richmond SCAN (Stop Child Abuse Now) will sponsor a screening of the documentary “Resilience: The Biology of Stress, and the Science of Hope” from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at St. Mary’s Hospital in Room 164. “Resilience,” the companion film to “Paper Tigers,” chronicles the birth of a new movement among pediatricians, therapists, educators and communities, who are using cutting-edge brain science to disrupt cycles of violence, addiction and disease. A short discussion will follow. Admission is free. To register, visit http://tinyurl.com/ResilienceScreening. Full text

Your weather just got better.

Henricopedia

Henrico's Top Teachers

The Plate