New law aims to improve breast cancer detection

Beginning July 1, women getting mammograms will learn whether they have dense breast tissue that could hide cancer. This is due to recent legislation that addresses the test’s failure to detect certain cancers in women with dense breast tissue.

Under the new law, if radiologists conducting mammograms find dense breast tissue, they must send the patient a letter noting that fact – and that dense breast tissue can hide cancer. The letter will urge women to talk to their physicians about the matter.

The new “patient inform” law resulted from efforts by a breast cancer survivor, Cathryn Tatusko of Fairfax County, with support from an aptly named national awareness organization called Are You Dense.

JoAnn Pushkin, co-founder of Are You Dense, said she was pleased that Virginia has enacted the new law.

“I am thrilled that women of Virginia will join those in Connecticut and Texas in receiving this life-saving information about their breast health,” Pushkin said.

During its 2012 session, the General Assembly approved two identical measures addressing the issue: Senate Bill 544, sponsored by Sen. John Edwards, D-Roanoke; and House Bill 83, introduced by Delegate Robert Orrock, R-Thornburg. Both bills passed unanimously, and Gov. Bob McDonnell signed them into law.

Currently, after a woman gets a mammogram, her referring physician receives a report from her radiologist with a statement on her breast density. However, the patient receives a letter without medical jargon that simply says whether abnormalities were detected. Women can ask for the more detailed report, but most don’t.

Studies also show that only one in 10 women learn about breast density from their doctors.

Most women have a combination of dense and fatty breast tissue. On a mammogram, dense tissue appears white and fatty tissue appears gray.

Cancers also show up as white on a mammogram. As a result, they can be hidden by dense tissue. In contrast, against fatty tissue, cancers stand out and can be more readily spotted.

Thus, women who have very dense breast tissue have a greater risk that their cancer could be overlooked. According to many studies, cancers can be obscured more than 40 percent of the time, depending on the degree of breast density.

Tatusko approached Orrock and asked him to propose the legislation. She did so after her own ordeal with breast cancer.

Tatusko’s dense breast tissue had masked the large tumor on the yearly mammogram she had just five months before being diagnosed with breast cancer. Even a mammogram she received the day of her diagnosis failed to show the advanced-stage cancer. As of February, Tatusko is considered cancer-free.

Are You Dense was founded by another breast cancer survivor, Nancy Cappello of Connecticut. Cappello persuaded her home state to pass a “patient inform” law in 2009, and she helped women in Texas pass legislation that same year. Fourteen states besides Virginia considered such proposals this year. A federal bill is also pending.
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Henrico Master Gardener training program accepting applications through Oct. 27


The Henrico County Office of Virginia Cooperative Extension is accepting applications for its next volunteer Master Gardener training program, which provides instruction in all aspects of horticulture.

Applications for the 2018 training program will be accepted through Friday, Oct. 27. Classes will be held from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays from Jan. 16 through March 22. > Read more.

Henrico Schools to host Oct. 30 job fair


Henrico Schools will host a job fair Oct. 30.

The event, to be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Fairfield branch library, is designed to attract potential full-time and substitute registered nurses, instructional assistants, bus drivers and school nutrition workers. > Read more.

Henrico Police to participate in ‘Tip a Cop’ Oct. 21


Henrico County Police Division and the Virginia Division of Capitol Police are participating in “Tip-A-Cop” to Support the Special Olympics Saturday, Oct. 21.

From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. that day at Red Robin, 11784 West Broad Street, members of the two agencies will be working for tips as a donation to the Special Olympics. > Read more.

Participants sought for ‘Walk to End Alzheimer’s’


The Richmond Walk to End Alzheimer’s will be held Saturday, Nov. 4, at Markel Plaza in Innsbrook, and the Alzheimer's Association of Greater Richmond is seeking participants.

The event, one of three walks the association will hold in its service area this year (the Middle Peninsula-Northern Neck walk was held Oct. 7 and the Fredericksburg walk Oct. 14) raises money to help the association fight the disease, which affects more than 26,000 people in the metro Richmond region. > Read more.

Fairfield meeting Oct. 25 to focus on cybersecurity


Henrico County Board of Supervisors Vice Chairman and Fairfield District Supervisor Frank J. Thornton will hold a constituent meeting Wednesday, Oct. 25 to discuss cybersecurity.

Thornton also has invited candidates who will be seeking election to local offices on Tuesday, Nov. 7 to introduce themselves. > Read more.

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The Short Pump Ruritan Club's 27th annual Craft Show will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Short Pump Middle School, 4701 Pouncey Tract Rd. More than 70 crafters and vendors will be participating featuring a variety of items, including handmade jewelry, purses, fall and Christmas décor, baked goods, photography, original paintings, Thirty-One, The Doll Hospital, doll clothes, handmade soap, candles and more. Flu shots and free blood pressure checks will be offered by IVNA. Admission is free. For details, contact Susan at 387-6804 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Full text

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