Henrico County VA
facebook twitter email rss

Moneyball

Tournaments bring huge economic impact, positive exposure to Henrico
A Greensboro (N.C.) player (right) takes control
of the ball despite the efforts of a Pride SC
Predators (Co.) player during a Jefferson Cup
U13 boys game at Dorey Park March. 11.
(Photo by Bridgette Lappas/Henrico Citizen.)
Pity the last-minute traveler who needs a weekend hotel room in Henrico County this month.

They’re likely all gone – reserved months ahead of time – by players, coaches, parents and fans of the Jefferson Cup soccer tournament, a three-weekend event that began last weekend and will involve 916 teams from 35 states and Canada before wrapping up March 25.

By its conclusion, the 916-team tournament will have brought more than 13,500 athletes and an estimated 20,250 spectators to Henrico and Metro Richmond, filling about 21,000 hotel room nights and contributing more than $15 million to the local economy.

And though the tournament is the most significant recreational sports event in the region, it’s not the only one helping to raise Henrico’s profile nationally while making a positive impression on its bottom line.

In Fiscal Year 2011 (which concluded June 30, 2011), nine youth and adult sporting events in Henrico County contributed $100,000 or more apiece to the county’s economy – including six that generated more than $1 million apiece – by drawing athletes from 1,999 teams, associated spectators and other visitors to the county from outside
the region.

In total, the economic impact felt by Henrico County as the result of recreational sports tourism during that time period totaled nearly $30 million, according to figures provided by county officials.

Factor in the professional sports – in the form of two NASCAR Sprint Cup Series and Nationwide Series races that take place each May and September at Richmond International Raceway in Henrico, drawing a total of more than 300,000 fans from all 50 states to the county and an estimated regional economic impact of $417 million annually – and
the effects of sports tourism here are clear.

“It means a lot of things,” Henrico Recreation and Parks Director Neil Luther said. “It certainly promotes spending in Henrico but it also is a good way to represent the county to these visitors who are coming in.”

Alive and kicking
When the Richmond Strikers hosted the first Jefferson Cup travel tournament in 1980, it’s likely that no one associated with the organization could have known what it would become. In the two decades after that first event with a handful of teams, the tournament steadily expanded and attracted more teams from outside the region and the state.

By 2005, it was drawing nearly 250 boys teams and 250 girls teams. Then the recession hit in late 2007, and participation in the tournament. . . increased. The Jefferson Cup has nearly doubled in size during the past seven years, growing despite the sagging national economy during a time when families are cutting their own budgets and watching every dime.

But perhaps that shouldn’t come as a surprise.

“Youth sports is fairly recession-proof,” said Scott Turner, the executive director of the Richmond Strikers Soccer Club, which host and organizes the tournament.

Luther agreed.

“Parents are spending a lot of money – maybe a thousand dollars a year to enroll their kids in a travel team,” Luther said. “We’re seeing the evidence backed up in national trends. People are making choices whether they’re just going on a family vacation or combining that with somewhere their children are going to be in a tournament.”

Today, the Jefferson Cup has grown into the largest single youth soccer travel tournament in the United States and one of the “big five” tournaments recognized as the best nationally (the others are held in Dallas, Orlando, San Diego and Washington, D.C.). It features competitions in age divisions from Under-10 through Under-19 and is divided into three weekends; March 9-11 for boys, March 16-18 for girls and March 23-25 for teams trying to qualify for next year’s event.

“The economic impact is huge for our county,” Turner said. “I’ve lived here for 25 years, and seen the growth.”

Though more than 1,400 teams applied for this year’s Jefferson Cup, tournament organizers rejected some 500 applications because those teams did not meet their high standards for inclusion. Despite the rejection, this year’s field grew by more than 100 teams compared with last year’s.

Tournament directors spend weeks reviewing each team’s performance during the previous year and running analytical models to ensure only the top teams are included, Turner said.

“We do our homework. Not only do we pick the highest quality games, but we bracket those games so they are very competitive,” he said. “Nobody wants to fly into Richmond from California and win every game 5-0.”

The steady growth of youth soccer in the United States has caught the attention of localities throughout the nation, many of which are angling to attract visitors and tourism dollars by hosting similar tournaments. But Metro Richmond has a leg up, Turner said.

“We’re aware this is a competitive market. Major complexes being built as we speak,” he said. “We feel like we’ve created a first-mover advantage. As long as we can deliver a high quality product, we believe teams will continue to come back.”

Impact of other sports
Though soccer clearly is the driving force behind the lion’s share of the economic impact felt by recreational sports tourism in Henrico, other sports are doing their part, too.

In recent years, Henrico has hosted a number of state, regional and national Babe Ruth Baseball and Softball tournaments in Varina and Glen Allen, including last year’s 14U Babe Ruth Baseball World Series at RF&P Stadium in Glen Allen. With those events under its belt, the county seems to have established itself in the rotation for future events.

Last year’s World Series, in which the home team fell one run short against a team from Oregon in the title game, served as a showcase not only to the teams and their supporters who made the trip, but also to those who could not. Henrico officials streamed all games live online for free, something most other host sites offer for a fee, if they offer it at all.

“After the tournament, I got an e-mail from a lady from Texas who was able to stream games,” Luther said. “She just said it was wonderful, it was a marvelous experience and that she was able to “be” here. She remembers Henrico County, and her son remembers Henrico County. That’s what this emphasis on sports tourism is all about, making
those connections.”

The county also is home to the Richmond Volleyball Club, located near Staples Mill Road and I-64, which hosts several large tournaments each year as well as local and regional events for adults, youngsters and high school teams.

In the past 12 months, RVC’s two largest tournaments combined to create an estimated economic impact of $3 million for the region, according to officials.

The 2011 South Atlantic Championship/Boys’ East Coast Championships last Memorial Day weekend drew 220 teams and more than 6,000 players and spectators to the Greater Richmond Convention Center, while January’s 2012 Monument City Classic attracted 280 teams and more than 8,500 players and spectators. In both cases, nearly all the
teams came from outside the region.

Because of its stranglehold on the local hotel market, Henrico benefits from events such as those even when they take place in another locality.

The MRCVB estimates that each out-of-town visitor that comes to the region for a sports tournament spends an average of $208 per day. Hotel operators in the county feel the positive effects of that spending.

“We’re booked all weekend,” said Dan Rand, sales director at the Comfort Suites hotel in Innsbrook, describing the impact of the Jefferson Cup tournament. “Typically we’re booked a couple of months in advance of these tournaments.”

Rand estimated that the hotel is completely booked about four to five times a year – and just about each occasion is directly related to a recreational sporting event or a NASCAR race. Recently, the nearby SkateNation Plus facility has helped fill a number of rooms at the hotel through ice hockey tournaments, Rand said.

SkateNation Plus is the only ice skating rink in Henrico and one of two primary facilities in the region and is home to youth and adult ice hockey leagues and tournaments, as well as figure skating competitions. It also attracts recreational ice skaters from the region and state.

Becoming proactive
During the past three fiscal years, sports tourism for recreational sporting events in Henrico has ranged between about $21 million and $33 million, according to county statistics.

While that immediate impact primarily is felt in the hospitality industry – through hotel stays and restaurant visits – and to a lesser extent through retail expenditures, the long-term benefits, though more difficult to measure, may be even greater to Henrico.

Tournaments and other sporting events provide an opportunity for the county to make a name for itself nationally by putting its best foot forward to tens of thousands of new visitors annually.

“Every one of them is potentially a customer, potentially a resident,” Luther said. “They may make a lot of decisions based on their first experience, their first experiences here.”

Tournaments like the Jefferson Cup present Henrico with a unique opportunity to capture far-away visitors and entice them to stay a few extra nights to enjoy the county’s history, shopping, performing arts and other amenities.

In an attempt to become more pro-active, Henrico officials recently created a new position for a tourism supervisor and hired former Henrico County Public Schools Public Information Director Dawn Miller to fill it. Miller is tasked with promoting all aspects of the county – including sports – to potential visitors and organizations.

“Sports tourism is one of the largest parts of travel right now [to Henrico],” said Miller, who has spent two weeks in the new position. “We’ve got different areas that we can plug other tournaments into. It’s an exciting future here for sports tourism.”

The climate is right for the county to capitalize on its assets, Luther said.

“We’re well positioned because of our facilities, exceptional staff, we have most of the hotel rooms in the area [nearly 54 percent of those in Metro Richmond, or 9,021 total], destination shopping – a lot of things that come together nicely for these people who come to town. Sports tournament venues are things that drive repeat visitation for your locality. They’re not just a one-and-done type event.”

A study conducted by the Richmond Metropolitan Convention and Visitors Bureau found that 93 percent of all visitors to the region planned to return – 44 percent within a year, and 61 percent within two years.

When they do come back, Luther wants them to know where they’re headed.

“We want them to know and love Henrico,” he said.
Community

Author, child abuse survivor to speak at Henrico event

To help celebrate twenty years of service to advocating for abused and neglected children in Henrico County, Henrico Court Appointed Special Advocates, Inc. (CASA) will host an evening with bestselling author K.L. Randis on Tuesday, Aug. 26, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Belmont Recreation Center in Lakeside.

Randis is best known for her bestselling novel, Spilled Milk, which tells her painful – but ultimately triumphant – personal story of abuse and of child abuse prevention. The book is her first novel.

The event is free to the public, but seating is limited Reservations may be made by e-mailing .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Belmon Recreation Center is located at 1600 Hilliard Road. > Read more.

Philippines ambassador to the US visits Filipino Festival in Henrico


The Ambassador of the Philippines to the United States Jose L. Cuisia, Jr. attended the Ninth Annual Filipino Festival at Our Lady of Lourdes Church earlier this month. Cuisia (pictured above with festival performers) was welcomed by County Manager John Vithoulkas and Brookland District Supervisor Dick Glover (below) at the church, which is located in Lakeside.

While enjoying some of the cultural performances at the festival, the ambassador and his wife had a private lunch with Vithoulkas, Glover, Eldon Burton (an outreach representative from U.S. Senator Mark R. Warner’s Office) and Father James Begley, the pastor of OLL. > Read more.

Dragon boats invade the James

Hundreds of spectators filled the banks of the James River to watch two dozen teams of competitors in the Walgreen’s Richmond International Dragon Boat Festival at Rocketts Landing Aug. 2. The event included a number of races, as well as several cultural performances. The sport is billed as the fastest growing water sport in the world.(Photo by Roger Walk for the Henrico Citizen) > Read more.

Page 1 of 115 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›

Entertainment

‘Planes’ sequel crashes

‘Fire and Rescue’ proves too predictable, boring

Planes: Fire and Rescue opens with a dedication to the hero firefighters of the world. It’s an admirable notion, and it makes sense, given that this is a film about planes that fight fires.

But here it might be a little out of place, as Planes: Fire and Rescue has a few things on its mind besides supporting the men and women who routinely throw themselves into burning buildings.

Like money. Lots and lots of money – into the 11-figures-and-counting range. In case you weren’t aware, 2006’s Cars was the biggest moneymaker Disney had in decades – not because of how much green the film printed at the box office, but because a combination of toys, games and snack foods stamped with the Cars seal of approval routinely pulls in tens of billions of dollars per year. > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


This weekend in Henrico, you can learn about fall herbs or mad science. Enjoy some laughs from West End Comedy or Three-Penny Theatre’s production of “The Rivah Home Companion.” For music lovers, Jennifer Nettles is in concert tonight and the fifth annual GWAR-B-Q takes place tomorrow at Hadad’s Lake. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

Restaurant watch

Find out how your favorite dining establishments fared during their most recent inspections by the Virginia Department of Health. > Read more.

Page 1 of 92 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›







 

Reader Survey | Advertising | Email updates

Classifieds

SAVE on Cable TV-Internet-Digital Phone. Packages start at $89.99/mo (for 12 months.) Options from ALL major service providers. Call Acceller today to learn more! CALL 1-888-686-5081.
Full text

Place an Ad | More Classifieds

Calendar

Visit Belmont Recreation Center, 1600 Hilliard Rd., on the third Tuesday of the month for “Old Time” music. This jam session (acoustic only) will be held from 7 p.m. to… Full text

Your weather just got better.

Henricopedia

Henrico's Top Teachers