Henrico County VA
facebook twitter email rss

McDonnell, Cuccinelli call for ‘School choice’

Gov. Bob McDonnell, Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli and other Republican officials called for more “school choice,” including helping low-income students attend private schools, at a rally at Capitol Square on Tuesday.

They were joined by several hundred students from Richmond-area private schools and other school choice supporters.

The rally was organized by the Family Foundation of Virginia, a nonprofit group that espouses conservative principles and religious values. The rally was held to support two bills before the General Assembly:

• House Bill 321, sponsored by Delegate Jimmie Massie, R-Henrico. It would give tax credits to corporations for making donations to nonprofits that provide private school scholarships for low-income students. Massie’s bill would cap the total credits at $25 million a year. It is awaiting a hearing by the House Finance Committee.

• Senate Bill 241, sponsored by Sen. Mark Obenshain, R-Harrisonburg. It would provide the same tax credit, but with the annual cap of $50 million. His bill is awaiting action by the Senate Finance Committee.

McDonnell called the legislation “a very simple and prudent step forward to give effective choice in Virginia.”

He said similar tax credit programs have been successful in other states, such as Florida, Pennsylvania and Arizona.

“Having traveled a lot, around the country and around the world, there are a lot of other states and a lot of other countries that are working really hard to improve their schools, to give young people greater educations and give parents more choices,” McDonnell said.

“If we’re going to continue to be an international leader in things like science and technology, we’ve got to continue to have greater choices and more quality in our schools.”

Cuccinelli echoed McDonnell’s sentiments. He said the government should empower parents.

“Let’s put the people whose moral responsibility it is to raise children in control of their children’s education, and that’s
parents,” Cuccinelli told the crowd.

The attorney general also used his time to endorse HB 947, sponsored by Delegate Rob Bell, R-Charlottesville. It would allow home-schooled students to participate in interscholastic activities at public schools. The measure is sometimes called the “Tim Tebow bill,” after the NFL quarterback who, as a home-schooler in Florida, was allowed
to play football for a local high school.

“That’s a bill I hope you will mention to your legislators today,” Cuccinelli said. “Homeschoolers have always had some tough sledding here. That’s something we should be looking to advance.”

The House is scheduled to vote on HB 947 on Wednesday.

Another speaker at the rally was Melvin Adams, president of a conservative religious nonprofit called Renew a Nation. He said school choice is a religious issue.

“It is the right thing to do because it will give greater opportunities to families who want a faith-based education for their
children – something that every child should have access to,” Adams said. “We are committed to the idea of offering every child a Christian worldview.”

The closing speaker, Dr. Alberta Wilson, compared the current educational system to the schoolyard rhyme “eenie, meenie, minie, moe” before a game of tag. “If, by chance, you live in a good school district, then your child could have that quality education,” said Wilson, the chief executive officer of Faith First, a Philadelphia-based nonprofit that provides scholarships to Christian schools.

“We are here because we want to declare, loud and clear, that we will no longer embrace an educational system that sings ‘eenie, meenie, minie, moe’ and plays the game of chance with our children. We demand school choice, not school chance.”

Victoria Cobb, president of the Family Foundation, said school choice legislation would help low-income families.

“School choice exists for the wealthy. They can put their kid in the right private school; they can move into the right school system,” Cobb said. “But for those that can’t afford it, the only school is the choice that’s given to them by the state. So if that choice isn't a fit for them, for whatever reason, we need to give them options.”

Critics of school choice say such policies undermine public schools. They have likened the tax credits to a voucher system for students to attend private schools. They say these programs drain resources from public schools, which cannot pick and choose which students to educate.

State budget analysts said up to 14,600 scholarships could be offered under Obenshain’s bill and half that many under Massie’s, if businesses donating the scholarships claimed the maximum tax credits allowed.

Under the legislation, the scholarships would go to students eligible for free and reduced-price lunches under federal income guidelines.
Community

Rotary donates to ‘Bright Beginnings’

The Sandston Rotary Club recently donated $1,000 to the Sandston YMCA for its Bright Beginnings program, which helps provide children in need with school supplies for the new school year. > Read more.

Author, child abuse survivor to speak at Henrico event

To help celebrate twenty years of service to advocating for abused and neglected children in Henrico County, Henrico Court Appointed Special Advocates, Inc. (CASA) will host an evening with bestselling author K.L. Randis on Tuesday, Aug. 26, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Belmont Recreation Center in Lakeside.

Randis is best known for her bestselling novel, Spilled Milk, which tells her painful – but ultimately triumphant – personal story of abuse and of child abuse prevention. The book is her first novel.

The event is free to the public, but seating is limited Reservations may be made by e-mailing .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Belmon Recreation Center is located at 1600 Hilliard Road. > Read more.

Philippines ambassador to the US visits Filipino Festival in Henrico


The Ambassador of the Philippines to the United States Jose L. Cuisia, Jr. attended the Ninth Annual Filipino Festival at Our Lady of Lourdes Church earlier this month. Cuisia (pictured above with festival performers) was welcomed by County Manager John Vithoulkas and Brookland District Supervisor Dick Glover (below) at the church, which is located in Lakeside.

While enjoying some of the cultural performances at the festival, the ambassador and his wife had a private lunch with Vithoulkas, Glover, Eldon Burton (an outreach representative from U.S. Senator Mark R. Warner’s Office) and Father James Begley, the pastor of OLL. > Read more.

Page 1 of 115 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›

Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


For our Top 10 calendar events this weekend, click here! > Read more.

Bottoms up

Short Pump brewery offers more than just beer
I am still (happily) thinking about my entire experience at Rock Bottom Restaurant and Brewery last week. Knowing nothing about this new brewery out of Denver, I was leery of brew-pub in the heart of Short Pump Town Center – this is not what I’d usually think of as a perfect fit, and yet, it was.

The restaurant and craft brewery opened in early June and features 10 beers made by female brewmaster Becky Hammond (pictured). This is the restaurant’s second location in Virginia; the first is in Arlington. Behind glass walls, customers watched the beer brewing in massive steel barrels. For our up-and-coming beer region, it makes sense that Short Pump would jump on board.

As I walked up to the back of the mall near the comedy club, I was taken aback by what I saw: at the top of the stairs was an overflowing restaurant with outdoor seating, large umbrellas and dangling outdoor lights. > Read more.

Cultural Arts Center announces 2014 fall class schedule

The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen is now registering participants for its fall 2014 schedule of classes.

The center will offer more than 100 classes for children and adults, covering topicssuch as culinary arts, fiber arts, visual and performance arts and more. Instruction is structured to appeal to a wide range of abilities, from beginners to experts of all ages. Class sizes are kept small to ensure maximum benefit for participants with generally no more than 15 students. > Read more.

Page 1 of 94 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›







 

Reader Survey | Advertising | Email updates

Classifieds

GET FREE OF CREDIT CARD DEBT NOW! Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 877-467-4560
Full text

Place an Ad | More Classifieds

Calendar

The American Red Cross will hold a blood drive from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Henrico Doctors’ Hospital Forest Campus, 1602 Skipwith Rd. Eligible donors with types O negative,… Full text

Your weather just got better.

Henricopedia

Henrico's Top Teachers