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McDonnell, Cuccinelli call for ‘School choice’

Gov. Bob McDonnell, Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli and other Republican officials called for more “school choice,” including helping low-income students attend private schools, at a rally at Capitol Square on Tuesday.

They were joined by several hundred students from Richmond-area private schools and other school choice supporters.

The rally was organized by the Family Foundation of Virginia, a nonprofit group that espouses conservative principles and religious values. The rally was held to support two bills before the General Assembly:

• House Bill 321, sponsored by Delegate Jimmie Massie, R-Henrico. It would give tax credits to corporations for making donations to nonprofits that provide private school scholarships for low-income students. Massie’s bill would cap the total credits at $25 million a year. It is awaiting a hearing by the House Finance Committee.

• Senate Bill 241, sponsored by Sen. Mark Obenshain, R-Harrisonburg. It would provide the same tax credit, but with the annual cap of $50 million. His bill is awaiting action by the Senate Finance Committee.

McDonnell called the legislation “a very simple and prudent step forward to give effective choice in Virginia.”

He said similar tax credit programs have been successful in other states, such as Florida, Pennsylvania and Arizona.

“Having traveled a lot, around the country and around the world, there are a lot of other states and a lot of other countries that are working really hard to improve their schools, to give young people greater educations and give parents more choices,” McDonnell said.

“If we’re going to continue to be an international leader in things like science and technology, we’ve got to continue to have greater choices and more quality in our schools.”

Cuccinelli echoed McDonnell’s sentiments. He said the government should empower parents.

“Let’s put the people whose moral responsibility it is to raise children in control of their children’s education, and that’s
parents,” Cuccinelli told the crowd.

The attorney general also used his time to endorse HB 947, sponsored by Delegate Rob Bell, R-Charlottesville. It would allow home-schooled students to participate in interscholastic activities at public schools. The measure is sometimes called the “Tim Tebow bill,” after the NFL quarterback who, as a home-schooler in Florida, was allowed
to play football for a local high school.

“That’s a bill I hope you will mention to your legislators today,” Cuccinelli said. “Homeschoolers have always had some tough sledding here. That’s something we should be looking to advance.”

The House is scheduled to vote on HB 947 on Wednesday.

Another speaker at the rally was Melvin Adams, president of a conservative religious nonprofit called Renew a Nation. He said school choice is a religious issue.

“It is the right thing to do because it will give greater opportunities to families who want a faith-based education for their
children – something that every child should have access to,” Adams said. “We are committed to the idea of offering every child a Christian worldview.”

The closing speaker, Dr. Alberta Wilson, compared the current educational system to the schoolyard rhyme “eenie, meenie, minie, moe” before a game of tag. “If, by chance, you live in a good school district, then your child could have that quality education,” said Wilson, the chief executive officer of Faith First, a Philadelphia-based nonprofit that provides scholarships to Christian schools.

“We are here because we want to declare, loud and clear, that we will no longer embrace an educational system that sings ‘eenie, meenie, minie, moe’ and plays the game of chance with our children. We demand school choice, not school chance.”

Victoria Cobb, president of the Family Foundation, said school choice legislation would help low-income families.

“School choice exists for the wealthy. They can put their kid in the right private school; they can move into the right school system,” Cobb said. “But for those that can’t afford it, the only school is the choice that’s given to them by the state. So if that choice isn't a fit for them, for whatever reason, we need to give them options.”

Critics of school choice say such policies undermine public schools. They have likened the tax credits to a voucher system for students to attend private schools. They say these programs drain resources from public schools, which cannot pick and choose which students to educate.

State budget analysts said up to 14,600 scholarships could be offered under Obenshain’s bill and half that many under Massie’s, if businesses donating the scholarships claimed the maximum tax credits allowed.

Under the legislation, the scholarships would go to students eligible for free and reduced-price lunches under federal income guidelines.
Community

Lions Club donates backpacks to elementary school

The Richmond West Breakfast Lions Club (based in western Henrico) recently donated 59 backpacks to the Westover Hills Elementary School on Jahnke Road.

Above, club members display some of the backpacks prior to their distribution. > Read more.

Glen Allen student to perform at Carnegie Hall

Thanks to a first-place win in The American Protege International Vocal Competition 2014, Glen Allen High School student Matija Tomas will travel to New York City to perform at Carnegie Hall in December.

At the first-place winners recital in Weill Hall, Matija will perform Giacomo Puccini’s opera aria, “Chi il bel sogna di doretta.” She will perform with other vocalists from around the world and have the opportunity to win other awards and scholarships.

Locally, Thomas has performed with Richmond’s renowned Glorious Christmas Nights, Christian Youth Theatre, and WEAG’s Urban Gospel Youth Choir. > Read more.

Gayton Baptist Church dedicates new outreach center


The John Rolfe YMCA and Gayton Baptist Church have partnered in an effort to bring greater health and wellness opportunities to the community.

Through this partnership, the John Rolfe Y will run Youth Winter Sports programs, including basketball and indoor soccer, in Gayton’s newly renovated $5.5 million outreach center that features a new gymnasium, youth and teen space, social space with café, meeting space and full service commercial kitchen. > Read more.

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Entertainment

The Boathouse to open at Short Pump Town Center

The Boathouse restaurant will open at Short Pump Town Center in the spring, its third location in the region.

“People have asked us to come to the West End for years,” said owner Kevin Healy. “When the opportunity arose, we knew had to jump on it.”

The new restaurant will be located in a 5,800-square-foot space under the Hyatt House Hotel at the town center and will include a large outdoor patio. > Read more.

Getting a ‘mouf’-ful

Boka Kantina exceeds its strong food truck reputation
Already a fan of Boka fare from outdoor events with the Tako Truck, I was delighted to learn of the new restaurant, and eager to see if its reputation held up after putting down brick-and-mortar roots.

Would the food lose its zest if I wasn’t enjoying it in the great outdoors? Would it seem pedestrian served from an ordinary kitchen instead of a truck?

Would the tacos be less satisfying as an antidote to normal lunch hunger – instead of being ingested to stave off desperate hunger after a long afternoon of crowds, sun, and tedious lines? > Read more.

Lakeside microbrewery beginning to take shape

Original Gravity gets the green light to move forward with relocation, expansion into larger space

A Lakeside home-brewing shop has felt the gravitational pull toward the booming craft beer scene.

Original Gravity, a shop that sells beer and wine kits for homebrewers, has just been given the green light to start work on a microbrewery.

Owner Tony Ammendolia is expanding his 1,000-square-foot shop in Lakeside Town Center to 5,000-square-foot digs a few doors down to add a brewery and expand his supplies.

Ammendolia opened the home-brew supply store in November 2011 and since then he said business has taken off.

“I think I outgrew this place in the first year,” Ammendolia said. “We’ve seen steady growth and I’ve been looking for a place to expand to move the shop to get more square footage.” > Read more.

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The Pocahontas Chapter of the Virginia Native Plant Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, 1800 Lakeside Ave. Artist Emily Herr will describe… Full text

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