Henrico County VA

Manager has appetite for service

Food may not be one of the first things you think about when you think of Richmond International Airport (RIC) in eastern Henrico County. But the food, coffee and brew being served at the airport, how they are served, and who’s serving them, is top of mind for Cain Bassett.

Bassett, a native of New Orleans, manages Delaware North Companies’ (DNC) food and beverage operations at RIC. He came to Richmond in 2005.

That was just as RIC was going through what Jon E. Mathiasen of the Capital Region Airport Commission calls, “an historic infrastructural expansion and modernization program.”

Plenty of parking and a bigger terminal are great additions to RIC, but the Commission also knew that taking care of people’s appetites was an important part of the multimillion dollar upgrade.

“The Commission wanted travelers to have a range of attractive options from known brands with an emphasis on customer service,” said Mathiasen, Commission, CEO and president.

Bassett and DNC, a hospitality management firm that operates concessions at airports and sports and entertainment venues around the world, provided the huge culinary change the Commission wanted.

Bassett, 56, who lives in western Henrico, ended up in Virginia as a result of what some would consider bad luck.

“When Hurricane Katrina hit, it basically eliminated my job [at New Orleans International Airport.] We lost everything. Katrina is the reason why we’re here,” Bassett said. “What was important was that my family was intact. I never looked at us as being victims.”

DNC offered Bassett and his wife, Alesia, three relocation choices: Fort Lauderdale, Los Angeles or Richmond.

“Richmond has been an excellent move,” Bassett said.

‘The people business’
Bassett’s nearly four decades of business experience started at a New Orleans restaurant that his parents owned. He started helping out there as soon as he was old enough to reach the table tops.

He admits he didn’t always love working at his parent’s place. As a teenager, he envied other teens who didn’t have to work over a hot kitchen grill on weekends. It took Bassett years to appreciate that those hours working for his parents helped him develop a strong work ethic.

When his parents died, he tried running the restaurant on his own. He soon figured out that he had a lot to learn about being a successful businessman.

In his early career, Bassett learned from a master. He spent many hours alongside Al Copeland, founder of Popeyes Famous Chicken. Bassett moved through the ranks learning the restaurant business (or as he prefers to call it, “the people business”) along the way.

He had just taken a job at the New Orleans airport when Katrina hit. Bassett and his wife have become empty-nesters as their four children and six grandchildren now live in Maryland and New Orleans.

These days, Bassett manages the 10 food and beverage facilities that DNC owns or operates at RIC. Applebee’s is the largest. Because it is outside the airport’s security gates, it serves travelers as well as people waiting to pick up family, friends or business associates.

The newest restaurant is the Club Level Grill on Concourse B. Basset and DNC worked with the Commission to open the restaurant and bar, which has a sports theme, last January.

Bassett supervises about 115 employees ages 15 to 74. He credits Copeland and Mathiasen, along with his parents, for playing roles in shaping him as a businessman. He’s determined to share that business knowledge with others.

Tough but compassionate
John Ball, a 1997 Highland Springs High School graduate, has worked for DNC for 15 years. He started as a dishwasher and has moved up to his current position as food and beverage manager. He and Bassett have developed a strong relationship.

“He’s more like a father figure and a boss for me,” Ball said. “If I’m wrong, he’s says, ‘Hey, John you’re wrong,’ and if I’m right, he let’s me know I’m right. I get both sides.”

Ball and Pamela Hamby, a former waitress who now manages Applebee’s while attending J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College, agree that Bassett can be a tough boss.

How tough is he? He once fired one of his sons for underperforming on the job.

“[Cain] is strong when he needs to be and he gets his point across, but he’s also compassionate about your needs as an employee,” said Hamby, a Tappahannock native.

Bassett will tell you that this business is not for everyone. However, for some it can be a great career and a source for important life lessons.

Bassett often teaches those lessons to young people in the Richmond area. He speaks at Henrico County high schools and volunteers with Junior Achievement of Central Virginia, teaching first graders as well as high school students.

“By sharing his personal and professional experiences and skills with students, Cain [Bassett] is helping students see the connection between what they are learning in school and what they will need to succeed in work and life,” said Daphne Swanson, president of Junior Achievement of Central Virginia.

Bassett jokes that he teaches young people so they’ll know how to earn money and be able to pay into the Social Security fund that will help cover the cost of his eventual retirement. But as you watch him interact with his young employees, you can see that he relishes his mentoring role.

When you ask him what he enjoys the most about his job, he says, it’s helping people.

“[I enjoy] taking an individual with minimum skills and developing those skills, helping them become a productive part of society. I can tell you stories of people who started out as hourly cashiers and are now running million dollar restaurants. I take pride in playing a small part of that development,” he said.

Then Bassett adds that he’s simply completing the circle that started when his parents taught him “the people business.”
Bail Bondsman Henrico VA Richmond VA
Community

Your trees, please

With a nod to Arbor Day, Citizen seeks photos, descriptions of significant Henrico trees

Do you have a favorite tree in Henrico?

Do you know of a tree with an interesting story?

Do you live near an especially large, old, or otherwise unusual tree – or do you pass by one that has always intrigued you?

Arbor Day 2015 (April 24) was last week, and though the Citizen has published stories about a few special trees over the years (see sidebar) we know that our readers can lead us to more. > Read more.

Henrico’s most famous tree


Henrico's most famous tree, known as the Surrender Tree, still stood for more than a century near the intersection of Osborne Turnpike and New Market Road -- until June 2012.

It was in the shade of that tree on April 3, 1865, that Richmond mayor Joseph Mayo met Major Atherton Stevens and troops from the 4th Massachusetts Cavalry and handed over a note surrendering the city to Federal troops. Evacuation had already begun. > Read more.

ARC event raises $75k for ICDS program


The Greater Richmond ARC's annual Ladybug Wine Tasting and Silent Auction on April 11 netted $75,165 to benefit its Infant and Child Development Services (ICDS) program.

About 350 guests sampled fine West Coast wines and craft beer from Midnight Brewery at Richmond Raceway Complex's Torque Club, along with food from local eateries. Carytown Cupcakes provided dessert. > Read more.

Page 1 of 127 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›

Entertainment

Henrico HS student selected as student playwright for ‘New Voices for Theater’ program


A Henrico High School student was one of eight students from Virginia selected as a 2015 student playwright as part of the School of the Performing Arts in the Richmond Community's 26th annual New Voices for the Theater Festival of New Works, which will be held July 10-11 at VCU.

Elaina Riddell of the Center for the Arts at Henrico HS will join the other students and bring her original one-act play to life on stage at the event. In total, 150 plays were submitted to SPARC. Riddell and the other winners will work closely with New York City-based professional playwright Bruce Ward for the event. > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


In the mood for some spring shopping? Eastern Henrico FISH will hold their semi-annual yard sale this weekend – funds raised assist at-risk families in Eastern Henrico County. Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden will hold a spring plant sale which is among the largest in the region with more than 40 vendors selling plants ranging from well-known favorites to rare exotics. Put on your detective hat and find out “whodunnit” at the movie “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows” and “The Case of the Dead Flamingo Dancer,” presented by the Henrico Theatre Company May 1-17. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


It’s that time of year – charity races are popping up everywhere! On Saturday, St. Joseph’s Villa will be the site of the sixth annual CASA Superhero Run and the fifth annual Richmond Free to Breathe Run/Walk will be held in Innsbrook. Also in Innsbrook, the 2015 Richmond Take Steps for Crohn’s and Colitis will take place on Sunday. If you’re more into relaxation than exercise, check out Wine for Cure’s Dogwood Wine Festival or the Troubadours Community Theatre Group’s production of “West Side Story” at the Henrico Theatre. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

Page 1 of 125 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›







 

Reader Survey | Advertising | Email updates

Classifieds

Sr. SAS Programmer Analyst w/MS degree & 1 yr. exp.: provide analytical support to perform data analysis, backend testing, adhoc reporting, custom./modify. to standard reports, dev. strategies to increase bus.… Full text

Place an Ad | More Classifieds

Calendar

The Henrico County Historical Society and Colonial Dance Club of Richmond will present An Afternoon of Dance and Tea from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Walkerton Tavern. Travel back… Full text

Your weather just got better.

Henricopedia

Henrico's Top Teachers