Top Teachers: Lourie Sledd

Lourie Sledd feels fortunate to be among a group of special exceptional education teachers in Henrico County.

But the parents of the students she’s taught feel fortunate that she’s been looking out for their children.

Sledd has spent her entire teaching career – more than two decades – in Henrico. She was inspired to work with intellectually disabled students by her sister, who taught such students in Henrico and Richmond before becoming a guidance counselor at Cosby High School in Chesterfield, where she works today.

Sledd landed at Freeman when it began its full-time program for intellectually disabled students 10 years ago.

Students in the program suffer from a range of disabilities, so she works to find ways to reach each one effectively. The program combines core academics with vocational and life skills. Some of her students also take mainstream elective courses at the school.

“Without Lourie’s leadership,” one nominator wrote, “the students in her class would be very isolated. Instead, they are part of the fabric of Freeman -- young people who attend plays, football games, talent shows; young people who have jobs all over the school and in the community; young people who have the opportunity to make connections with their peers and teachers all day long.”

That, according to Sledd, is her goal every day.

“My kids, I just see them every day walking through the door, and I think about the obstacles they must face before they walk through that door,” Sledd said. “Their bravery, all the challenges they face just keep me going.”

But she’s adamant that what she does is no more significant that what dozens of others of teachers in the county do.

“I am only one of 100 exceptional ed teachers who should get this [recognition], and I really mean this,” she said. “I know many special ed teachers who work late every day and then work all weekend.”

Sledd helped create the Career Pathways Club at Freeman, a program that allows mainstream and disabled students to work side by side selling spirit items in school and at sporting events while developing real-world business skills at the same time. She also is heavily invested in the all-star basketball league, which matches teams of disabled students from county high schools against each other in weekly basketball games.

To Sledd, the most visible change during her time as an educator has been the way that mainstream students have accepted and welcomed special education students into their lives. At Freeman, one of her students even was crowned homecoming king.

“That’s what they want more than anything, is friends,” Sledd said. “They’re just part of the gang now.”

Students with certain intellectual disabilities are permitted to stay in high school until the age of 22.

As a result, Sledd has taught some students for as long as seven years. She considers the best part of her job to be the realization that she’s helped her students thrive in school – and in life.

“They come in as immature teenagers and leave as young adults,” she said. “It’s very fulfilling knowing that you helped them along the way. Many of them will get jobs, be productive citizens and hopefully lead happy lives. Being part of that is very special.

“They’re just amazing kids. I get strength from them.”
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New law paves way for delivery robots

Having your groceries delivered by a robot sounds like something out of The Jetsons, but that prospect is not as futuristic as you may think.

For the second year in a row, the Virginia General Assembly has passed a law to legalize the operation of autonomous vehicles. Beginning July 1, “electric personal delivery devices” will be allowed to operate on sidewalks and other shared-use paths throughout Virginia.

> Read more.

Virginia schools must soon test for lead in water

With the water crisis in Flint, Michigan, safe drinking water is a high priority nationwide, especially for children. Beginning July 1, schools in Virginia will be required to test their potable water for lead.

Senate Bill 1359, which Gov. Terry McAuliffe signed into law on March 20, seeks to ensure that local school boards test the drinking water in schools and that it meets federal guidelines. The Food and Drug Administration recommends that the level of lead not exceed 15 parts per billion. > Read more.

Business in brief


The Virginia Society of Certified Public Accountants (VSCPA) has announced its officers and Board of Directors for the 2017–18 fiscal year. At-large Board members include: Anne B. Hagen, CPA, of Masonic Home of Virginia in Henrico. The officers and directors were sworn in at the VSCPA’s annual business meeting on May 16 in Williamsburg. > Read more.

Free weekly 5k coming to Henrico

The Richmond metro area is no stranger to 5k races and events. To participate in most 5k events, runners must register and pay a fee. But the Parkrun organization will be providing Henrico County with a free 5k every Saturday at Deep Run Park starting June 3.

Parkrun began in England in 2004 and eventually found its way to the U.S.

The Deep Run Parkrun program will be the 10th one in the U.S., said Darrell Stanaford, the country manager for Parkrun USA. > Read more.

State Police urge motorists to #MoveOver during Memorial Day weekend

Memorial Day signifies the official start of summer, and Virginia State Police officials are urging motorists to "do what’s right when they see lights" and move over.

The “Move Over” law is a lifesaving law intended to protect public safety professionals and highway workers who help to maintain the safety of the Commonwealth’s roads. State Police are using the #MoveOver hashtag on social media to promote the law. > Read more.

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Boy Named Banjo will perform at 8 p.m. at The Tin Pan, 8982 Quioccasin Rd. Born and raised in Nashville, Tenn., the original three of Boy Named Banjo consists of members Barton Davies, William Reames and Willard Logan, all of whom share a love for songwriting, performing and roots music. Since the band's first full-length release in May 2012, “The Tanglewood Sessions,” Boy Named Banjo has added two members: Sam McCullough (drums) and Abe Scott (bass). Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door. For details, call 447-8189 or visit http://www.tinpanrva.com. Full text

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