Henrico County VA

‘LEED’ing the Way

Solar House Joins School, Library in Glen Allen’s ‘Green’ Corridor
It's hard to miss the latest addition to the "LEED Row" that has sprung up along Staples Mill Road, just down from the new Glen Allen High School.

The newly-renovated 1939 cottage at the corner of Hungary Spring Road, across from Staples Mill Plaza, is nearly dwarfed by the 12-foot by 10-foot solar panel in its side yard.

Which is exactly the visibility Hugh Joyce had in mind when he first envisioned a test house incorporating the latest in energy-efficient innovations.

"I was looking for something to be a model," he told visitors at a Nov. 30 open house, part of a series of "Sustainable Richmond Tours" hosted by the Richmond chapter of the American Institute of Architects.

"This is perfect," said Joyce of the location. "It's so high-profile -- so in-your-face."

Enviable Bills
As president of James River Air Conditioning Company, Joyce had long been contemplating an experimental site that would showcase the company's different products and allow him to monitor energy usage and "test our theories."

Following extensive renovation, the home has acquired a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) platinum certification from the U.S. Green Building Council – the highest rating possible.

That brings the number of LEED-certified buildings along the mile-long stretch of Staples Mill to three, and makes the home a fitting neighbor for the other LEED-rated structures: the gold-certified Glen Allen H.S. and silver-certified Glen Allen Library.

What's more, the home's innovative features – which include a Google power meter, solar sun tracking, LED lighting, rain water and gray water recovery for irrigation, Energy Star appliance package, and a special air filtration system – are having the desired energy-saving effects. Among the displays at the open house were copies of recent Dominion Virginia Power bills that averaged only slightly more than $20 a month.

A few days after the tour, the November bill came in at enviable $16.39.

"As we speak," Joyce told a recent visitor to the house, "we're selling back 1.5 kilowatts to the power company per hour."

Science Project
Around the corner from the Hungary Spring house, Joyce is using knowledge gained from building the model to construct another solar home -- this time, one to put on the market. "And once we sell that one," he said, "we will build another."

The newer home, which is not located on a commercial corner like the model, will require less visible solar panels; Joyce plans to install knee-high banks of panels and surround them with bushes.

"It's an industrial corner here," he said of the model home, indicating the shopping center across the street and several utility poles in the corner yard. "If there weren't already a lot of poles, we wouldn't have gotten away with [the large solar panel]."

Asked how the next door neighbor feels about living next to a giant solar panel, Joyce replied, "He loves it."

Not only is the exterior of the house much more cosmetically pleasing, said Joyce, but it also has been vacated by some less-than-desirable neighbors.

"There were pit bulls living in here," Joyce said, adding that the dogs' chewing habits forced him to reevaluate plans to reuse the original interior. "There was not a piece of trim that wasn't ripped to smithereens."

He was pleased to report, however, that one signature piece of the old house was salvaged: the front door. "It was beat-up," he said, "but we were able to rebuild it."

The home, which also boasts Earthcraft Virginia platinum certification and EPA Energy Star certification, will continue to serve as a "static science project," said Joyce. He plans to continue learning, and tweaking, from each new home.

While he noted that green-building costs still outweigh whatever energy savings are achieved, projects such as the model home help to demonstrate that green buildings and lifestyles are attainable.

And regardless of global trends toward greener buildings, and whether a worldwide energy crisis will force a shift to alternative energy, Joyce added, "Everyone should want to be green."

"Every new endeavor I do will be green," said Joyce.

"It just makes sense."
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Community

19th Annual Asian American Celebration planned May 21

The Asian American Society of Central Virginia will hold its 19th Annual Asian American Celebration on Saturday, May 21 at the Greater Richmond Convention Center, 403 N. 3rd St. in Richmond, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Admission is free.

The theme for this year’s celebration will be “Our Heritage," in recognition of May as the Asian Pacific American Heritage month, designated by the U.S. Congress in 1992. > Read more.

Sandston Founders Club honors Sydnor


The Founders Club of Sandston presented lifetime membership to Charles W. Sydnor at its 12th annual meeting last month.

Sydnor, who grew up in Sandston and later served as president of Emory and Henry College for eight years, was honored by Founder Club President Alice Taylor Baldwin at the April 23 event at Sandston Memorial Recreation Center. > Read more.
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Restaurant watch

Find out how your favorite dining establishments fared during their most recent inspections by the Virginia Department of Health. > Read more.






 

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CAT Theatre, located at 319 N. Wilkinson Rd., will present “Don’t Cry For Me, Margaret Mitchell” May 20 to June 4. This hilarious show is based on actual events from… Full text

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