Kindergartners get pumped up for school

Every year, thousands of Richmond-area five-year-olds show up on the first day of school in September -- only to be turned away.

For kindergartners, their parents soon learn, being "on time" for the start of the school year is actually too late. Because of requirements for school entrance – including proof of age, immunizations and residency – the registration process should begin weeks earlier. In an ideal world, in fact, all kindergartners would be registered by spring.

That's why superintendents from nine regional school districts gathered in Richmond in January to make a historic announcement promoting early enrollment: for the first time ever, 10 localities would share a common date for kindergarten registration.

On April 7, Harvie Elementary School in eastern Henrico will be one of the schools open for registration throughout the school day, and for evening hours as well.

Terry Hill, who is in her third year of teaching kindergarten at Harvie, has a background in early education. The prospect of a boost in spring registration attendance is welcome, Hill says, not simply because parents will receive an information packet about paperwork requirements for fall, or because future students will get a chance to meet teachers. The early registration will also provide Hill with the chance to inform parents of the all-important readiness skills that children should practice over the summer.

Last September, Hill started out the year with several students who could not distinguish a letter from a number. In the same classroom, she had students who were already reading.

"By Christmas, they were all on the same page," says Hill, while noting that with a little preparation in recognizing letters and numbers, those students could have avoided playing catch-up.

Parents who attend registration day will learn how to help their children with reading readiness, as well as with personal and independence skills -- from zipping their coats to practicing self-control.

At the beginning of the year, Hill recalls, she had one child who insisted on standing instead of sitting, and another who would enter the classroom at a run -- "from one end of the room to another, knocking things off the table."

"Sometimes," Hill observes, "they've never been in a situation where they had to sit in place or be still."

Class of 2023
Enter the classroom on a Friday in March, however, and all is orderly and calm. A class ambassador greets visitors at the door with a handshake and bravely musters a successful, if fleeting, moment of eye contact.

"My name is Nina Rich," says the ambassador shyly. "And I am going to graduate in 2023!"

After students finish a writing exercise and join Hill on the classroom's Oval Carpet, she introduces her special guests of the day: a bucket of worms from the Hill home garden. Students eager to touch a worm get a chance to pass it around; before long, a few reluctant students join in.

Even this simple exercise, Hill explains later, is a learning experience.

"It's about empowerment," she says, "and learning confidence."

Like taking turns at being the classroom ambassador, handling the worms gives children practice in getting out of their comfort zones. "It shows them," says Hill, 'I was scared to do this, but I did it.' "

Next, the students practice their tallying skills, totaling the votes of those who like worms and those who don't. A cheer goes up once the results are in: the worms win in a landslide, 15-1.

After her students leave for physical education, Hill notes that upon their return to class on Monday, they will be writing about the worm experience.

"Four or five sentences," she marvels. "I never would've thought two years ago that [kindergartners] could write like this."

Virtually all the students know at least 100 sight words and can read, as well; some are reading chapter books. But it's the parents, Hill emphasizes, who deserve most of the credit for those achievements. Although all her parents work during the day, they have supported her classroom efforts in the evenings through practice with flash cards and books.

Getting pumped
Observing her students' achievements produces mixed emotions, reflects Hill with a wistful smile. "This is the time of year I get sad. They came in on all different levels, but there's been so much growth in each of them."

At the same time, she welcomes the chance to see her students move on -- especially since she still sees many former students on a daily basis.

"The second graders come in and give me hugs," she says. "I ask the boys, 'Are you too big for a sticker?'" None of them, she adds with a smile, has turned down a sticker so far.

Not all students will move on to first grade, however. Among those who will be repeating kindergarten is a student whose enrollment was months late due to delays in getting vaccinated.

But even missing the first two weeks of school, says Hill, can set a student back. It's during those weeks that students learn the rules, adjust to routines, and begin to take ownership of the place. "Missing that piece is a big deal."

A student who enters school late will also miss out on the sense of excitement that pervades at April registration and August orientation.

On registration day, says Hill, teachers and staff will go to great lengths to fuss over students and get them pumped up about entering school. "It's a very warm first start. It lays the pathway to orientation and lets them know what to expect. They're getting comfy, getting inside the school, knowing they'll need to bring a snack and to have supplies."

By the first day of school in September, Hill points out, students who attend registration day will have already had four interactions with her: registration, orientation, and a welcoming phone call and post card. It's not unusual, she says, for those students to greet her with a hug -- "like greeting a friend again."

The well-prepared student, she adds, will also be more likely to grasp the concept of personal responsibility for his or her success, and thus be more likely to succeed in school.

"Kindergarten isn't hard," says Hill. "But you need to learn to read in kindergarten, because everything builds on that.

"Once they're reading . . . [they realize] school is not a chore. It's a positive experience, and it's fun."

Kindergarten registration will take place April 7 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Henrico elementary schools. For detailed information, including a list of answers to Frequently Asked Questions, visit readychildren.net.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Applications for Leadership Metro Richmond Class of 2018 now open

Applications for the Leadership Metro Richmond (LMR) flagship program Leadership Quest are now open at http://www.lmronline.org until May 1. Community leaders from Ashland, Charles City, Chesterfield, Goochland, Hanover, Henrico, New Kent, Powhatan and the City of Richmond are encouraged to apply.

All interested candidates are encouraged to attend a recruitment reception March 8 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Markel Corporation, 4501 Highwoods Parkway in Glen Allen. The reception will give candidates the opportunity to meet current LMR members and learn more about the organization. > Read more.

Reynolds CC 4-week, 8-week classes start March 7


Classes start March 7 for Reynolds Community College’s second 8-week and third 4-week spring semester sessions. Registration for both sessions is currently open and runs through the start of classes. Students can register 24 hours per day online by visiting http://www.reynolds.edu. Students can also register in-person in Enrollment Services located on each campus. > Read more.

Public comment sought for plan to reduce impacts of natural disasters

The joint Hazard Mitigation Technical Advisory Committee for the Richmond and Crater regions is seeking public comment on the draft update of the Richmond-Crater Multi-Regional Hazard Mitigation Plan.

Hazard mitigation is the effort to reduce loss of life and property by lessening the potential impact of future disasters. The 26 localities of the Richmond and Crater regions maintain the plan to collaboratively identify vulnerabilities associated with natural disasters and develop long-term strategies to reduce or eliminate long-term risks. > Read more.

Democrat VanValkenburg kicks off Gen. Assembly campaign


Senior students at Glen Allen High School will get a personal touch when studying elections with their AP government teacher.

That teacher, Schuyler VanValkenburg, recently announced his intention to seek the Democratic nomination for the 72nd District seat in the House of Delegates. If he earns the nomination, he will run against Del. Jimmie Massie, R-Henrico, who has been unopposed for 10 years.

VanValkenburg, a 2004 University of Richmond alumnus who majored in history, is running for office for the first time. Although he has lived in Richmond since he began his undergraduate studies, aside from one year spent in Seattle, he said he never felt it was his time to run. > Read more.

Construction begins on JA Finance Park at Libbie Mill


School and business leaders from around the region, including (pictured, from left) Simon Hodges of Dominion Resources, Daphne Swanso(president of Junior Achievement of Central Virginia) and Henrico County Manager John Vithoulkas, gathered at Libbie Mill Library Feb. 23 for the Junior Achievement Finance Park construction kickoff. > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


Given the warm weather lately, Saturday’s RVA Polar Plunge Winter Fest, benefiting Special Olympics Virginia, might actually be enjoyable! Other weekend events you’re sure to enjoy include the 14th annual Richmond Kids Expo at the Richmond Raceway Complex, the Richmond Symphony and The Taters in concert at The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen, and the Richmond Ballet Minds in Motion Team XXL performing at the Henrico Theatre. This is also the last weekend to check out HATTheatre’s production of “Bill W. and Dr. Bob.” For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

 

February 2017
S M T W T F S
·
·
·
·
·
·
·

Calendar page

Classifieds

Place an Ad | More Classifieds

Calendar

Home school students from across the region are invited to experience how economics, tobacco, and trade helped colonize the New World during Henricus Home School Day at Henricus Historical Park from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Students will be divided by age for appropriate hands-on activities and curriculum and take on trade and agriculture activities focused on exploring how they helped shape the 17th century. Admission is $14 for students and $8 for adults. Registration is required by Feb. 13 by calling 318-8797. Full text

Your weather just got better.

Henricopedia

Henrico's Top Teachers

The Plate