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Janis proposes stiffer penalties for child endangerment

A Louisa County child abuse case sparked legislation proposed by Del. William R. Janis, R-Glen Allen, to increase penalties for anyone convicted of endangering a child.

The case involved Louisa residents Laura and Ronald Jewell, who were accused of torturing their 8-year-old granddaughter.

The prosecutor, Louisa Commonwealth's Attorney Tom Garrett Jr., said the girl sneaked out of her house on July 8, 2010 and ran to neighbor’s home for help. The neighbors, upon hearing a noise around 3 a.m., opened their door and found the girl, who was covered in bruises. She told the neighbors that she had been beaten and asked for help. The neighbors then proceeded to call 911.

The little girl was missing significant chunks of hair, Garrett said. She had open sores behind her ears and a small portion of one of her ears was missing. One of her ankles was broken and she had what looked like cigarette burns all over her body, he said.

The Jewell grandparents, with whom the girl was living, had made a “home-security system” to keep her in her room, Garrett said. They did so by tying a pan to her doorknob, which would make lots of noise when she would try and open the door.

Laura Jewell was convicted of malicious wounding and felony child abuse and neglect, and faces up to 30 years in prison when she is sentenced next month. Ronald Jewell pleaded guilty to felony child neglect and also faces substantial prison time.

The issue at hand, Garrett said, is that child torture statues are located in the child labor section of Virginia legislation. The judge presiding over the Jewell case stated that since the grandmother wasn’t the child’s employer, she couldn’t enact the penalties that come along with a child labor law infraction.

Janis said the problem is that the statutes pertained more to child labor laws as opposed to child abuse under criminal code. The acts that came out of those discussions were labor-related and not catered to children who were physically harmed by a parent, he said.

“We want to have as many teeth for physical abuse as we do for sexual abuse,” Garrett said.

Legislative changes would give prosecutors more ways to help victims and convict abusers. The bill Janis proposes, HB 1996, would make it a Class 3 felony with additional penalties for cases similar to the Jewell convictions. A related measure he submitted, HB 1995, would allow victims of child pornography to collect civil damages from offenders.

“There are three things we’re trying to do within these codes. Firstly, we want to move child torture and abuse from the child labor codes to the criminal code. Secondly, we want increased restitution for the victims of said abuse. And thirdly, we want more distinctions within the code regarding levels of offenses,” Garrett said. There is currently nothing within the code that addresses the varying atrocities of child abuse, torture and neglect, he said.

Garrett said he spoke with Janis early on in the Jewell case about the various issues within the code. Janis was eager to try to make improvements, he said.

With regard to this year’s legislative session, “I’m afraid because budget times are so tight,” Garrett said. More people in prison means more money spent.

This isn’t something a lot of lawmakers are going to want to hear, he said, “but if you’re breaking kids’ ankles, in my opinion, you deserve to be in jail.”

– Liz Monahan is a reporter for Capital News Service
Community

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Author, child abuse survivor to speak at Henrico event

To help celebrate twenty years of service to advocating for abused and neglected children in Henrico County, Henrico Court Appointed Special Advocates, Inc. (CASA) will host an evening with bestselling author K.L. Randis on Tuesday, Aug. 26, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Belmont Recreation Center in Lakeside.

Randis is best known for her bestselling novel, Spilled Milk, which tells her painful – but ultimately triumphant – personal story of abuse and of child abuse prevention. The book is her first novel.

The event is free to the public, but seating is limited Reservations may be made by e-mailing .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Belmon Recreation Center is located at 1600 Hilliard Road. > Read more.

Philippines ambassador to the US visits Filipino Festival in Henrico


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While enjoying some of the cultural performances at the festival, the ambassador and his wife had a private lunch with Vithoulkas, Glover, Eldon Burton (an outreach representative from U.S. Senator Mark R. Warner’s Office) and Father James Begley, the pastor of OLL. > Read more.

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The restaurant and craft brewery opened in early June and features 10 beers made by female brewmaster Becky Hammond (pictured). This is the restaurant’s second location in Virginia; the first is in Arlington. Behind glass walls, customers watched the beer brewing in massive steel barrels. For our up-and-coming beer region, it makes sense that Short Pump would jump on board.

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Cultural Arts Center announces 2014 fall class schedule

The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen is now registering participants for its fall 2014 schedule of classes.

The center will offer more than 100 classes for children and adults, covering topicssuch as culinary arts, fiber arts, visual and performance arts and more. Instruction is structured to appeal to a wide range of abilities, from beginners to experts of all ages. Class sizes are kept small to ensure maximum benefit for participants with generally no more than 15 students. > Read more.

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Lavender Fields Herb Farm, 11300 Winfrey Rd. in Glen Allen, will present a “Growing Herbs & Fall Vegetables” class from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The class will discuss planning… Full text

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