In the garden

The celebrations and obligations of the holiday season added to an already busy life can make this time of the year hectic and stressful. A few moments each day watching birds at a backyard birdfeeder often provide an interesting and entertaining break that most people find they want to keep in their life long after the holidays have ended.

Now is an excellent time to start feeding the birds according to John Coe, Henrico Master Gardener and president of the Virginia Audubon Council. “We’re just now seeing an influx of the birds that winter here,” he said.

“I’ve had Eastern bluebirds, yellow-rumped warblers and cedar waxwings at my feeder already,” added Coe. He has also seen white-throated sparrows and dark-eyed juncos.

In our area, unless we have very severe weather, birds can survive on their own, so people who begin feeding birds don’t have to worry about potentially harming them if they leave the feeder empty for a few days.

“I travel,” said Coe. “Only in extreme circumstances could you harm your birds by feeding them and suddenly cutting them off.”

Many different styles of feeders are available. Coe uses an open platform feeder, which looks much like a tray, as well as tube feeders and suet logs. And he makes sure some seed is also on the ground.

The type of feeder, like the type of seed you use, will determine what kind of birds visit your backyard.

“You find good quality and not-so-good quality seed mixtures available,” said Coe. “With bird seed, you really get what you pay for.”

Coe says that a mixture of black oil sunflower seeds, millet and fine ground cracked corn will attract many birds that winter in central Virginia such as cardinals, chickadees, nuthatches, house finches, and titmice. He recommends buying the separate components and mixing them yourself for the best results.

“Water is very important, too” said Coe. “Many people forget all about providing water.”

Birds like shallow water, nothing “over their knees.” Water containers should only be 2-3” deep without a slippery surface. You’ll need to remember to change the water regularly to keep it clean. You can also add a small heater or just remove any ice that forms on cold days.

Place your feeder where birds can find shelter quickly. “Birds like to be able to hide,” said Coe. Shrubs, brush or even a slightly used Christmas tree can provide shelter.

When you put out your feeder, remember that it sometimes takes a while before the birds show up. If no birds arrive after 10 days, you’ll need to move your feeder or try waiting until bad weather.

“Once you’ve got them, they’ll stay as long as the food is there,” said Coe. “And birds are wonderful creatures to watch.”
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

County streamlining, expanding some GRTC routes in Henrico


Some of Henrico County’s busiest GRTC bus routes will expand to include weekend service and will be regularly scheduled in 30- or 60-minute intervals, a Henrico Department of Public Works official told the county's Board of Supervisors earlier this month.

“This is about optimizing routes,” County Manager John Vithoulkas said. > Read more.

AAA to host summer car care events Saturday


AAA Mid-Atlantic will host summer car care events this Saturday, July 29, including at one of its Henrico locations.

AAA surveys show that many motorists are unprepared for roadside emergencies, so the organization will offer free battery, tire pressure and car maintenance checks at the events, which will run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. > Read more.

Janet James, pastor


Tennessee native Pastor Janet James of Gayton Kirk Presbyterian grew up in a small town surrounded by mountains in Eastern Tennessee called Dayton.

She grew up worshiping Baptist, but that soon changed when she attended college and explored her religious options. James attended a worship and music conference in 1989 in Montreat, N.C., that made her question her career choices. She could not stop studying and reading more about God and decided to go to career counseling. > Read more.

New utility services number for metro area

Richmond city, Henrico, Chesterfield and Hanover county natural gas customers have a new number to call for their utility services.

The City of Richmond Department of Public Utilities has replaced its old number, (804) 646-7000 as well as 311, with it's new number, (804) 646-4646 for all calls relating to utilities. Utilities include natural gas, water, sewer, storm-water and electric street-lighting. > Read more.

Henrico County property transactions, July 10-16


A sample of property transactions during this period appear below:

3714 Pemberton Ave.- $105,000, 720 SF (built in 1957), from William F. Patton Jr. to Jessica Garcia.

510 Besler Ln.- $121,000, 964 SF (built in 1986), from Joseph and Coral P. Bolden to Taneen Marlow.

3502 Westcliffe Ave.- $140,000, 1,564 SF (built in 1947), from Benny H. Wilson Jr. to Benjamin A. Nyannor. > Read more.

Henrico Business Bulletin Board

July 2017
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The Henrico County Division of Fire and Henrico Area Mental Health & Developmental Services (MH/DS) will present a free class on how to administer naloxone to potentially save the life of someone who has overdosed on opioids. The Revive! Opioid Overdose and Naloxone Education for Virginia class will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the MH/DS offices at 4825 S. Laburnum Ave. The class is open to the public and will provide hands-on instruction on how to administer the drug in its nasal spray form. Participation will be limited to the first 50 registrants. To sign up, go to http://surveymonkey.com/r/9Q35Q6T or call (804) 727-8574. Callers will be asked to leave an email address where they can receive a link to register for the class. Full text

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