In the garden


In fall, gardeners often start thinking about perennials either because they want to add additional plants to their gardens or because they need to take at least some of them out of their garden beds.

Perennials are plants that don’t die after one season but continue to live year after year. The category actually includes trees, shrubs, lawns, hardy bulbs, some vegetables and houseplants, and a large number of plants that are grown for their ornamental flowers or foliage. Many of these ornamentals are called “herbaceous perennials,” meaning the tops of the plants die in fall and come up again in spring.

Plants that live through the winter are “hardy.”

Many people plant perennials thinking they can save themselves a lot of work in the future. Plant them once, and they’ll continue to come up. But perennials are not maintenance-free. They typically require feeding, staking, and cutting back after they bloom. Periodically, many of them also need to be dug up and divided.

“Usually I wait until we’ve had a heavy frost to start putting my garden to bed,” says Henrico Master Gardener Erica Gilliam.

Gilliam says she cuts some plants in her garden back while leaving others. “”It’s nice to get your garden cleaned up and looking better,” says Gilliam, “But I leave some things up like the purple coneflowers because the birds eat them.”

Gilliam also divides some of her perennials in fall, but tends to wait until spring for most. “The plants are smaller in spring, so it’s easier,” she says.

Perennials should be divided when they are dormant, according to the Virginia Cooperative Extension publication “Perennials: Culture, Maintenance and Propagation,” either “just before a new season of growth, or in the fall so they can become established before the ground freezes.”

Gilliam often shares plants with friends. “I’ve always heard that if you divide your plants and give them away to your friends, you can always go back to them if you lose your original plant,” she says.

“My friends shared a lot of plants with me,” says Gilliam. “In the first years, I used to have teas in my garden so my friends could come over and see their babies growing here.”

Gilliam calls her garden a “colonial friendship cutting-garden,” partly because many of the plants were given to her by friends, and partly because friends helped inspire the design.

“When we first moved here and friends came to visit, we took them to colonial sites around the state,” says Gilliam, “and I got interested in the gardens.” She was particularly inspired by Monticello, and today her garden includes many plants that would have been found in Thomas Jefferson’s gardens interspersed with modern cultivars.

“Something is usually blooming in my garden from February to November,” says Gilliam. “I like to cut them and bring the color into the house.”

Though most perennials bloom for only a few weeks, combining plants that bloom at different times ensures continuous blooms.

Gilliam says some of the blooms in her garden also remind her of family members. “My peonies came from my mother,” she says. “And the evening primroses.”
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Henrico Police arrest 2 Georgia men in connection with January murder


Henrico Police have arrested and charged two Georgia men with first-degree murder in connection with the Jan. 18 murder of 36-year-old Lamont Cornelius Baldwin in the 1200 block of Dominion Townes Terrace.

Antonio Tyrone Johnson (above, left) and Santonio Rodrigus Brown (above, right), both 24 and both of Atlanta, were charged. Johnson also was charged with use of a firearm in commission of a felony and possession of a firearm by a felon. > Read more.

Man struck and killed in western Henrico hit-and-run

A 24-year-old man died after being struck by a hit-and-run driver in western Henrico April 23.

The victim, Emmanuel Isaiah DeJesus, was found lying on the side of the roadway at about 10:25 p.m., April 23 near Patterson Avenue and Palace Way. He was transported to a local hospital, where he was pronounced dead. > Read more.

Henrico woman earns national pharmacy fellowship


Henrico County native Nilofar “Nellie” Jafari recently was named the American College of Clinical Pharmacy-American Society of Health-System Pharmacists-Virginia Commonwealth University Congressional Healthcare Policy Fellow for 2017-18.

Jafari is a 2007 graduate of J.R. Tucker High School.

Pharmacists selected for the fellowship have the opportunity to gain real-world insight into health care policy analysis and development via immersion in the congressional environment. > Read more.

Section of Lauderdale Drive to be closed April 26 for drainage improvements


The westbound lanes of Lauderdale Drive will be closed between John Rolfe Parkway and Cambridge Drive on Wednesday, April 26 for drainage improvements.

The lanes are expected to be closed from approximately 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Motorists will be detoured from westbound Lauderdale onto John Rolfe, Gayton Road and Cambridge before being directed back onto Lauderdale. > Read more.

Henrico Police to host prescription drug take-back event April 29


The Henrico County Division of Police and the U. S. Drug Enforcement Administration will participate in the nationwide Prescription Drug Take Back Program Saturday, April 29. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Henrico County Training Center, 7701 East Parham Road, next to the Public Safety Building.

The program is free and anonymous. Unused or expired pills, patches and liquid prescriptions (in their sealed original container) will be accepted. Needles and sharp items will not be accepted. No questions will be asked. > Read more.
Community

YMCA event will focus on teen mental health


The YMCA, in partnership with the Cameron K. Gallagher Foundation and PartnerMD, will host a free event May 2 to help parents learn how to deal with teen mental health issues. “When the Band-Aid Doesn’t Fix It: A Mom’s Perspective on Raising a Child Who Struggles” will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Shady Grove Family YMCA,11255 Nuckols Road. The event will focus on education, awareness, and understanding the issues facing teens today. > Read more.

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.
Entertainment

Restaurant Watch


Find out how your favorite dining establishments fared during their most recent inspections by the Virginia Department of Health. > Read more.

 

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The 2017 Take Steps for Crohn’s & Colitis will take place at Innsbrook’s Northshore Commons, 4951 Lake Brook Dr. Take Steps empowers patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and provides a safe and welcoming environment for patients and their families to connect and inspire one another. Walk Day is filled with music, food, kid's activities, local entertainment and most importantly, the company of hundreds of people who truly understand the impact of IBD. Check-in and festival start at 3 p.m. and the walk will begin at 4 p.m. For details, visit http://tinyurl.com/2017TakeSteps. Full text

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