In the garden


Let’s be honest. Sometimes gardening can be a pain – in your knees, your shoulders, your neck and your back. But gardening doesn’t have to be such a painful experience if you plan ahead and do a few simple things to take care of yourself while you work.

First, think about when you plan to work outside. You’ll want to work during the time of day when you feel best. Obviously, mornings are usually cooler, but if your best time is in the heat of afternoon, you’ll need to be especially careful to drink plenty of water, take rest breaks, and not push yourself when you’re hot and tired.

Dress for the activity. Protect your skin with an effective sunblock, a hat and gloves. Wear shoes or boots that fit well to provide stability and support for your feet and ankles, and use knee pads or knee braces if you have trouble with your knees.

And plan your work. “My personal favorite suggestion is to do one activity for half an hour, then change and do something different,” says Henrico Master Gardener Janie Vincent. “People don’t think about it, but if you’ll rotate your activities you won’t end up with such sore muscles.”

Henrico Master Gardener Pat Green also suggests using ergonomic tools to help save muscles. A few of her favorites include long-handled pruning shears, a trowel with a 4-foot handle, and a rake and a hoe with second handles that allow her to comfortably use both her hands when raking or hoeing.

“I also have a plastic tractor-like seat that rocks so that I can reach into the garden without having to bend over,” she says.

Green says she looks at the ads in gardening publications and visits garden stores to find tools that have been modified to make gardening easier.

“I’m 82,” says Green, “And I enjoy working in my garden. Right now, my garden is beautiful.”

Green says she planned her garden with an eye to reducing workload over time. “Once you have the bones of your garden in place and you’ve put in a lot of perennials, you don’t have as much work each year,” she says.

“You have to get the garden in when you’re young enough to do it so that you can enjoy it when you get older,” she adds with a laugh.

Green also uses pots in her garden and on her deck.

“I love pots,” she says. “They provide an up-close display, you can easily control the quality of the soil, and you can locate them so that it’s comfortable to work with them.” In her garden, Green often puts her pots on pedestals.

The Virginia Cooperative Extension Service has other suggestions for making work in the garden easier. Use a wheelbarrow or cart to haul tools and supplies around the garden, and consider wearing a carpenter’s apron with pockets for carrying small tools. Weed after irrigating or rain because weeds will be easier to pull out of moist
soil. And keep pruners sharp to make cutting easier.

And, of course, ask for help or hire someone for those jobs that are just too difficult.

Gardening can provide great exercise and reduce stress. It’s an activity you should enjoy.
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Fresh Air Fund seeks host families


The Fresh Air Fund, a program through which nearly 4,000 children from low-income New York City communities spend a summer with host families in communities along the East Coast and in southern Canada, is seeking hosts for the coming summer.

According to the organization, there is no such thing as a “typical” host family. First-time Fresh Air children are boys and girls, from seven to 12 years old. Children who are reinvited by host families may continue with The Fresh Air Fund through age 18 and can enjoy extended trips. > Read more.

Godwin student wins in statewide STEM essay contest

Governor Terry McAuliffe and the Virginia Council on Women announced recently that Morgan Logsdon of Mills E. Godwin High School was one of five statewide winners of the sixth-annual STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) Essay Contest for young women enrolled in their junior or senior year of high school.

The Council on Women established the contest to award scholarships to high school junior and senior young women who plan to pursue STEM careers at institutions of higher education. > Read more.

Varina meeting May 2 to address opioid crisis in Henrico


Varina District Supervisor Tyrone E. Nelson will hold a Community Conversations meeting Tuesday, May 2 to discuss the opioid epidemic in Henrico County.

The meeting will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Henrico Theatre, 305 E. Nine Mile Road. Nelson will be joined by County Manager John A. Vithoulkas and members of the Henrico Heroin Task Force for a discussion of heroin and opioid abuse and ways to prevent it. > Read more.

Baker ES to remain closed until fall


Baker Elementary School students will complete the 2016-17 school year at other locations and will return to a restored building in fall 2017, school leaders have decided.

The decision was made in order to provide ample time for repairs to be completed at the fire-damaged school and to avoid additional interruptions to instructional time. > Read more.

Henrico Police arrest 2 Georgia men in connection with January murder


Henrico Police have arrested and charged two Georgia men with first-degree murder in connection with the Jan. 18 murder of 36-year-old Lamont Cornelius Baldwin in the 1200 block of Dominion Townes Terrace.

Antonio Tyrone Johnson (above, left) and Santonio Rodrigus Brown (above, right), both 24 and both of Atlanta, were charged. Johnson also was charged with use of a firearm in commission of a felony and possession of a firearm by a felon. > Read more.

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April 2017
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Good Vibrations Chorus will perform inspirational songs, patriotic tunes and popular Broadway melodies from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Libbie Mill Library. Good Vibrations Chorus consists of nearly 30 dedicated volunteers who share their love of music with audiences throughout the Richmond area. For details, call 501-1940 or visit http://www.henricolibrary.org. Full text

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