In the garden


Harvesting vegetables out of your own garden is very satisfying. Vegetables you grow yourself just seem to taste better, and it’s particularly nice to know they also help reduce the grocery bill.

You can continue to enjoy home-grown vegetables until first frost or, in some cases, until several weeks after the first freeze if you begin putting a fall vegetable garden in now.

In Central Virginia, the first frost usually occurs around Oct. 15, so early August is the right time to begin planning and planting.

“We’ll start our seeds during the next couple of weeks,” says Henrico Master Gardener Robin Bryant, who’s planning a fall garden with residents at the home where she works as a counselor. “It will be time to take out our squash, and that frees up a big space for planting.”

Last year Bryant raised fall crops of lettuce, beets, collards, turnips and kale in her garden. “Some crops will even overwinter here,” she says. “Last year, I thought the kale was dead and started to pull it out, but my boyfriend suggested we leave it in, and it came back in the spring.”

Many vegetables can be grown in the fall, and the flavor of some, such as cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, spinach, Jerusalem artichokes, and Brussels sprouts may actually be improved after a frost.

If they’re mulched, kale, spinach, onions, lettuce, parsley, parsnips, carrots and salsify can be enjoyed throughout the winter.

Before planting fall crops, you may need to restore nutrients removed by spring and summer crops by adding compost or a light application of a complete chemical fertilizer to your soil.

Seeds need to be planted in moist soil so plant after a rain or water thoroughly the day before. The Virginia Extension Service recommends sprouting seeds indoors before planting for a fall garden. Sprouted seeds can be planted deeper than normal which helps prevent them from drying out.

Bryant hasn’t tried sprouting her seeds before planting, but she agrees that attentive watering is a must, especially after seedlings begin to appear. “You have to keep watering,” says Bryant. “Water, water, water, every day, sometimes even twice a day, or the little seedlings are not going to make it.”

Insects may not pose the same problems in fall vegetables because their peak activity is usually in mid-summer, but you’ll still need to check the plants periodically. Rotating crops so that those in the same family are not put back into the same space in the garden can also help prevent disease and pest problems.

“When I was a child gardening with my father, we only had a summer garden,” says Bryant. “But when I became a master gardener, I learned about fall gardens and started planting them.”

“We really enjoy our gardens,” she adds.

Fall gardens help optimize production from your gardening space, and they can be an opportunity to try again if something you planted in the spring didn’t grow. As Henrico Extension Agent Lisa Sanderson says, “Gardening is always a lovely learning experience.”
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State Police urge motorists to #MoveOver during Memorial Day weekend

Memorial Day signifies the official start of summer, and Virginia State Police officials are urging motorists to "do what’s right when they see lights" and move over.

The “Move Over” law is a lifesaving law intended to protect public safety professionals and highway workers who help to maintain the safety of the Commonwealth’s roads. State Police are using the #MoveOver hashtag on social media to promote the law. > Read more.

Henrico to hold June 8 open house on Route 5 Corridor/Marion Hill study

The Henrico County Planning Department will hold an open house Thursday, June 8 for residents and other members of the public to provide input for a study of the Route 5 Corridor/Marion Hill areas.

The open house will be held from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Varina Area Library, 1875 New Market Road. The meeting’s informal structure will allow the public to attend at their convenience and to ask questions and discuss the study one on one with Planning staff. > Read more.

Henrico real estate staying strong despite low inventory

The Henrico real estate market has been relatively strong for the past month, despite a lower amount of inventory, according to data from Long and Foster Real Estate.

In the past month, 408 homes have been sold in Henrico, which is 2 percent less than were sold in the same timeframe in 2016.

Last year the median sale prices for Henrico homes was $219,975, whereas this month it's up to $232,500, a 6 percent increase. Which means half of the homes in Henrico are priced above $232,500 and half are priced below. > Read more.

Smither named director of Henrico’s Department of Finance

Henrico County Manager John A. Vithoulkas has appointed Edward N. “Ned” Smither Jr. to serve as director of the Department of Finance, effective July 1.

Smither has served Henrico since 2013 as director of the Accounting Division in Finance. He will succeed Eugene H. Walter, who has delayed his retirement until June 30 to ensure an orderly transition within the department.
> Read more.

State honors EMS officials this week

There were nearly 1.5 million emergency medical services calls and 4,063 incidents per day in Virginia just last year.

This week, May 21-27, declared as National EMS week by Gov. Terry McAuliffe, recognizes the more than 34,000 EMS personnel and 631 agencies in the state and commends their efforts and commitment to Commonwealth citizens.
> Read more.

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May 2017
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The Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation will host the Virginia Ride for Kids at 11 a.m. The family-friendly loop ride begins at Richmond International Raceway and travels through Henrico County. Any make or model of street legal motorcycle is welcome. There will be activities for non-riders as well, including a bike show, food, vendors, speakers and activities for the whole family. The Virginia Ride for Kids is one of 30 PBTF-hosted motorcycle rides taking place this year. Now in its 15th year, the Virginia Ride for Kids has raised more than $1.1 million to help the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation fund childhood brain tumor research and life-changing family support programs. Admission is free but a minimum donation of $40 per motorcycle is encouraged. For details, visit http://www.rideforkids.org. Full text

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