In the Garden

Days when temperatures climb into triple digits followed by evenings with fast-moving thunder storms can leave beginning gardeners unsure about whether or not to add supplemental water to their vegetable gardens.

The general rule of thumb is that plants need about one inch of water a week either from rain or irrigation or a combination of the two.

The amount of water can vary depending on the type of soil in the garden, but the objective is to wet the soil to a depth of 5 or 6 inches and not water again until the top few inches begin to dry out.

“Your garden needs to be watered deeply,”says Henrico Extension Agent Lisa Sanderson. “And that requires some time.

“Some people think sprinkling water with a hose for a few minutes and wetting the surface of the soil will be enough,”she adds,“but deep watering is not something you can do for 10 minutes and be done.”

Taking the time to water plants deeply can make them more resistant to droughts because the plants develop deep roots.

“Watering a little bit every day encourages shallow roots,” says Sanderson, “So plants dry out quicker. And watering every day helps surface seeds, which are usually weeds, to germinate and grow.”

Sanderson cautions that every garden is different, so gardeners need to check their soil to see when to water. Sandy soils may need to be watered more often, while a clay soil can hold moisture longer. Organic matter that you can add by incorporating it at tilling or by top dressing plants with compost can help soil hold moisture.

“You can use a rain gauge to see how much rain water your garden is getting,” says Sanderson. “Or use a soil meter to see how dry the soil is.”

“Fingers are also wonderful things to check soil moisture,”she adds. “Or use a trowel to pull back some soil and check for moisture.”

The best time to water is in the morning when cooler temperatures mean less water will be lost to evaporation. Watering early also allows foliage that gets wet to dry before nightfall.

“It’s better to water at the roots,”says Sanderson. “More water gets to the plant, and you have fewer issues with disease caused by moisture on the leaves.”

If time is an issue, busy gardeners can use soaker hoses that allow water to slowly seep out all along their length. Placed at the base of plants and left on for sufficient time, soaker hoses can provide the deep watering that plants need.

“It’s also a great idea to mulch your plants,”says Sanderson. Mulch conserves moisture in the soil by slowing evaporation and can prevent backsplash on leaves during watering. Plus mulching helps to control weeds that compete for the soil’s moisture.

Sanderson adds that these watering principles also apply to landscape plants.

“Usually, established plants are fine,” she says,“but when you have these hot, hot days, it’s a good idea to keep your eye on your plants to see if you need to water.”
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Crime Stoppers’ Crime of the Week: May 22, 2017

This week, Crime Stoppers needs your help to find the suspects vandalizing Dominion Energy equipment in Varina.

On Feb. 6 and May 3, someone shot at equipment belonging to Dominion Energy. Both incidents occurred near Kingsland Road between the hours of midnight and 3 a.m. The equipment was damaged, causing a major inconvenience to customers who lost power and posing a safety hazard to people nearby. > Read more.

A place to excel

It's no surprise when a business deal begins to take shape during a golf outing.

Perhaps less common is the business deal that percolates during a youth football practice. But such was the case for Varina District Supervisor Tyrone Nelson.

During a visit to former Varina High School football star Michael Robinson's football camp, Nelson was discussing with Robinson his excitement for the new Varina Library, whose opening last June was at that time forthcoming.
> Read more.

Business in brief


Long & Foster Real Estate recently named Amy Enoch as the new manager of its Tuckahoe office. Enoch brings more than 15 years of real estate expertise to her new position, and she most recently led Long & Foster’s Village of Midlothian office. Enoch has served in both sales and management positions during her tenure at Long & Foster. Prior to her real estate career, Enoch worked in information technology and hospitality. She is a graduate of Radford University, where she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in economics, English and history. Enoch has also received the designation of Graduate, Realtor Institute (GRI) from the National Association of Realtors, and this showcases her expertise in the fundamentals of real estate. > Read more.

Henrico recognized as a 2017 ‘Playful City USA’ community


A national nonprofit organization, KaBOOM!, has selected Henrico County as a 2017 Playful City USA community. The organization encourages communities to bring fun and balanced activities to children every day.

Henrico's selection is joined by the city of Richmond, town of Ashland, as well as the counties of Charles City, Chesterfield, Goochland, Hanover, New Kent and Powhatan. All of the localities make up the first region completely recognized through Playful City USA. > Read more.

Gallagher Foundation serves more than 14,000 teens in first year


In its first year, The Cameron K. Gallagher Foundation reached 14,000 teens through its programs from Spring 2016 to date. The foundation is dedicated to spreading positivity and erasing stigmas by educating and creating awareness on depression, anxiety and stress among teens. CKG delivers programs at schools, community events and its West End office.

“Students are in need of the information in the workshops, whether they know it or not, and they aren’t getting it anywhere else,” said Beth Curry, Director of Health and Wellness at The Steward School. > Read more.

Henrico Business Bulletin Board

May 2017
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The J.R. Tucker High School Drama Boosters will host the “Race to the End” Color Run from 7:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the school, 2910 N. Parham Rd. Participants of the event will be rewarded with post-race events on campus including vendors, concessions and kid activities. Race registration includes bib, color packet and t-shirt (guaranteed to participants that register by May 4). Cost is $25 for students, $35 for adults and $30 for groups of five or more. Proceeds from the race will benefit the J.R. Tucker School String Players’ trip to Edinburgh, Scotland to perform in The Fringe. To register, visit http://bit.ly/JRTcolorrun. Full text

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