In the garden

Pet worms? Well, not exactly.

But those whose plants have benefitted from the rich vermicompost that worms produce are usually enthusiastic about having a plastic bin of these wiggly red creatures in their home. Vermicompost is a humus-like material that contains large numbers of worm castings produced when organic materials pass through a worm’s gut.

“It’s an alternative to conventional backyard composting,” said Henrico Extension Agent Karen Carter. “And it’s generally a faster process.”

Conventional composting depends on micro-organisms to break down organic wastes. Vermicomposting uses worms for most of that work. The worms are housed in a plastic “worm bin.” Carter periodically gives “make and take” workshops for people interested in trying the process.

“None are scheduled right now,” said Carter, “but if you’re interested, call the Extension Office, and we’ll put your name on a waiting list.”

To make a worm bin, drill air holes around the top of a 14-gallon plastic container, roughly 24 x 16 x 12.5 inches. Add roughly 4 pounds of shredded newspaper, a gallon of water, and 2 quarts each of coffee grounds and purchased bagged compost.

“We recommend the bagged compost,” said Carter. “With backyard compost, you run the risk of bringing in insects.”

Last, and most important, add a pound of worms.

“Be sure you get the right worms,” said Carter. “That’s critical because not just any earthworm will work. You need Eisenia fetida, the red wiggler worm.”

The worms are commercially available on line, or you may be able to get them from someone who is already vermicomposting. Periodically, the bins have to be divided both as a method of harvesting the vermicompost and because the worms can easily double in number.

“Harvesting the compost can be the most challenging part,” said Carter. “Some people use purchased systems rather than making their own because they can make separating the worms from the vermicompost a little easier.”

Worms can eat most fruits and vegetables provided they are not too salty or too acidic. Meat, dairy products, and fatty or greasy foods shouldn’t be given to the worms. Coffee grounds including the filters and tea bags also make excellent food.

“Make sure you don’t overfeed the worms,” cautioned Carter. Under optimum conditions, worms can process their body weight in food each day. Typically, however, they can’t quite eat that much, and overfeeding can create odor problems.

Carter recommends anyone interested in starting a worm bin look online at the Virginia Extension publication, “Composting Your Organic Kitchen Wastes with Worms.”

“It’s excellent,” she said. “But we recommend one slight change. Don’t drill drainage holes in the bottom of the bin. Not having them doesn’t turn out to be a problem, and sometimes having those holes in the bottom of your bin makes a mess.”

Without the drainage holes, a worm bin can be kept in the kitchen or basement, anyplace where temperatures don’t fall below freezing or go over 100 degrees Farenheit.

“Vermicomposting can be more convenient than backyard composting,” said Carter. “Plus, it’s an interesting process to watch, particularly if you have children and want to teach them about the natural world.”
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Henrico Police warn citizens to ‘Take it, Lock it or Lose it’


Eastern parts of Henrico County have witnessed a recent increase in larceny from automobiles, so Henrico Police officials are spreading the word to encourage citizens to lock their vehicles.

Police are handing out and posting fliers and putting message boards in neighborhoods to educate residents.

There usually is a rise of larceny from automobiles during Christmas, spring and summer break, said Henrico Police Officer James Bupp. > Read more.

Glover to be inducted posthumously into Babe Ruth Hall of Fame


Late Brookland District Supervisor Dick Glover will be inducted into the Babe Ruth Southeast Region Hall of Fame during a ceremony Aug. 14 at RF&P Park at approximately 6:30 p.m., prior to a 14-and-under Babe Ruth World Series game. The Glen Allen Youth Athletic Association, which is hosting the World Series, made the announcement July 18. > Read more.

Rolls-Royce supplier lands in Henrico


A United Kingdom-based supplier for Rolls-Royce has established an office and manufacturing center at the Byrd Industrial Park in Eastern Henrico, the Greater Richmond Partnership announced July 18.

Erodex Ltd., a graphite products maker, recently signed a five-year agreement with Rolls-Royce to supply goods to the automotive company's Crosspointe campus in Prince George, Va. Erodex invested $2 million and hired four to quickly ramp up production for its client. > Read more.

New Walmart opens in Eastern Henrico


JULY 19, 7 A.M. – Eastern Henrico's first Walmart Supercenter opens to the public today at 5001 Nine Mile Road. The store, which occupies about 190,000 square feet and employs about 300 people, is located at the site of the former Fairfield Commons Mall, which is now known as Eastgate Town Center. > Read more.

Unattended oily rags cause fire in commercial building near Richmond Raceway


Unattended oily rags that spontaneously combusted caused an early morning two-alarm fire Tuesday in a commercial building in the 3800 block of Carolina Avenue, across from Richmond Raceway.

Henrico firefighters were called at about 5:10 to respond to reports of smoke coming from the building. Once they arrived five minutes later, they found thick smoke pushing from the rood on two sides of a warehouse whose tenant specializes in woodworking and hardwood floors. > Read more.

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July 2017
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The Innsbrook Executives’ Breakfast Series continues at 7:15 a.m. at the Richmond Marriott Short Pump, 4240 Dominion Blvd. Latrell Scott, Norfolk State University’s head football coach, will be the speaker. Scott, who previously coached at University of Richmond and Virginia State University, will present “Building a Culture in Football and Business.” Cost is $25 to $30. The series continues on the third Thursday of every month. The meeting is open to all – you don’t have to be an executive or work in Innsbrook to attend. For details, visit http://www.innsbrook.com. Full text

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