In the garden

Pet worms? Well, not exactly.

But those whose plants have benefitted from the rich vermicompost that worms produce are usually enthusiastic about having a plastic bin of these wiggly red creatures in their home. Vermicompost is a humus-like material that contains large numbers of worm castings produced when organic materials pass through a worm’s gut.

“It’s an alternative to conventional backyard composting,” said Henrico Extension Agent Karen Carter. “And it’s generally a faster process.”

Conventional composting depends on micro-organisms to break down organic wastes. Vermicomposting uses worms for most of that work. The worms are housed in a plastic “worm bin.” Carter periodically gives “make and take” workshops for people interested in trying the process.

“None are scheduled right now,” said Carter, “but if you’re interested, call the Extension Office, and we’ll put your name on a waiting list.”

To make a worm bin, drill air holes around the top of a 14-gallon plastic container, roughly 24 x 16 x 12.5 inches. Add roughly 4 pounds of shredded newspaper, a gallon of water, and 2 quarts each of coffee grounds and purchased bagged compost.

“We recommend the bagged compost,” said Carter. “With backyard compost, you run the risk of bringing in insects.”

Last, and most important, add a pound of worms.

“Be sure you get the right worms,” said Carter. “That’s critical because not just any earthworm will work. You need Eisenia fetida, the red wiggler worm.”

The worms are commercially available on line, or you may be able to get them from someone who is already vermicomposting. Periodically, the bins have to be divided both as a method of harvesting the vermicompost and because the worms can easily double in number.

“Harvesting the compost can be the most challenging part,” said Carter. “Some people use purchased systems rather than making their own because they can make separating the worms from the vermicompost a little easier.”

Worms can eat most fruits and vegetables provided they are not too salty or too acidic. Meat, dairy products, and fatty or greasy foods shouldn’t be given to the worms. Coffee grounds including the filters and tea bags also make excellent food.

“Make sure you don’t overfeed the worms,” cautioned Carter. Under optimum conditions, worms can process their body weight in food each day. Typically, however, they can’t quite eat that much, and overfeeding can create odor problems.

Carter recommends anyone interested in starting a worm bin look online at the Virginia Extension publication, “Composting Your Organic Kitchen Wastes with Worms.”

“It’s excellent,” she said. “But we recommend one slight change. Don’t drill drainage holes in the bottom of the bin. Not having them doesn’t turn out to be a problem, and sometimes having those holes in the bottom of your bin makes a mess.”

Without the drainage holes, a worm bin can be kept in the kitchen or basement, anyplace where temperatures don’t fall below freezing or go over 100 degrees Farenheit.

“Vermicomposting can be more convenient than backyard composting,” said Carter. “Plus, it’s an interesting process to watch, particularly if you have children and want to teach them about the natural world.”
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

County streamlining, expanding some GRTC routes in Henrico


Some of Henrico County’s busiest GRTC bus routes will expand to include weekend service and will be regularly scheduled in 30- or 60-minute intervals, a Henrico Department of Public Works official told the county's Board of Supervisors earlier this month.

“This is about optimizing routes,” County Manager John Vithoulkas said. > Read more.

AAA to host summer car care events Saturday


AAA Mid-Atlantic will host summer car care events this Saturday, July 29, including at one of its Henrico locations.

AAA surveys show that many motorists are unprepared for roadside emergencies, so the organization will offer free battery, tire pressure and car maintenance checks at the events, which will run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. > Read more.

Janet James, pastor


Tennessee native Pastor Janet James of Gayton Kirk Presbyterian grew up in a small town surrounded by mountains in Eastern Tennessee called Dayton.

She grew up worshiping Baptist, but that soon changed when she attended college and explored her religious options. James attended a worship and music conference in 1989 in Montreat, N.C., that made her question her career choices. She could not stop studying and reading more about God and decided to go to career counseling. > Read more.

New utility services number for metro area

Richmond city, Henrico, Chesterfield and Hanover county natural gas customers have a new number to call for their utility services.

The City of Richmond Department of Public Utilities has replaced its old number, (804) 646-7000 as well as 311, with it's new number, (804) 646-4646 for all calls relating to utilities. Utilities include natural gas, water, sewer, storm-water and electric street-lighting. > Read more.

Henrico County property transactions, July 10-16


A sample of property transactions during this period appear below:

3714 Pemberton Ave.- $105,000, 720 SF (built in 1957), from William F. Patton Jr. to Jessica Garcia.

510 Besler Ln.- $121,000, 964 SF (built in 1986), from Joseph and Coral P. Bolden to Taneen Marlow.

3502 Westcliffe Ave.- $140,000, 1,564 SF (built in 1947), from Benny H. Wilson Jr. to Benjamin A. Nyannor. > Read more.

Henrico Business Bulletin Board

July 2017
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Crossroads Art Center, 2016 Staples Mill Rd., will hold an Open House and Artist Reception from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Featuring World Art Group, Members Show and the BuyRVAart Spring Into Summer exhibition. There will also be food, music, magic and more. For details, visit http://www.crossroadsartcenter.com. Full text

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