Henrico County VA

Historical essays win honors for Henrico fifth-graders

Fifteen Henrico fifth-graders were honored for their essays on historical topics at the 10th Annual Historical Awareness Project Awards Reception, held Nov. 29 at the Eastern Henrico Recreation Center.

Sponsored by the Historic Preservation Advisory Committee in cooperation with the Henrico Division of Recreation and Parks and Henrico County Public Schools, the project is based on the county’s fifth-grade curriculum and is designed to provide students with an awareness of their local heritage, while encouraging them and their families to learn more about their community history.

This year, students were invited to write about events, persons, or places that shaped Henrico history, and chose to write about historical figures from Pocahontas to Virgil Hazelett. At the awards ceremony, first-place winners from each of the five magisterial districts read their essays aloud to the audience, which included many of the students’ teachers and principals, as well as Henrico County Public Schools Superintendent Patrick Russo and Pat O’Bannon and Frank Thornton of the Board of Supervisors.

Inspiration, enjoyment, humor
The first-place winner from the Brookland District, Anna Thill of Echo Lake E.S., chose to write about the legendary educator Virginia Randolph. “Virginia Randolph was more than just a teacher,” wrote Thill. “She was an inspiration to many people.”

Noting that the educator began her career at the age of 16, Thill described the one-room schoolhouse where Randolph conducted her lessons for African American students, and the emphasis she placed on skills such as gardening, woodworking and sewing in addition to academics. While some parents of that era disliked Randolph’s ideas and methods and preferred strictly book-learning, Thill expressed her hopes that students to come will enjoy the opportunity to engage in more hands-on learning, and shared her wish that farms will once again be plentiful in the Henrico County of the future.

Aare’n Johnson of Arthur Ashe E.S. won first place from the Fairfield District with her essay entitled, “The Life of Pocahontas,” which focused on the Indian princess’ role as a peacekeeper. Johnson highlighted her essay with events in Pocahontas life that included saving the life of Captain John Smith, helping the settlers and marrying John Rolfe, and concluded, “Whenever I think of Pocahontas I think of peace, braveness and love.”

Three Chopt District winner Audrey Lowe wrote her essay about the Short Pump community, its odd name and its beginnings with the tavern that provided a rest stop for travelers between Richmond and Charlottesville. Comparing the largely rural nature of the area with Short Pump’s modern-day status as a commercial and residential hub, Lowe pointed out that the community has become “a small city type society.” She concluded by expressing her appreciation for the enjoyment she found in researching and learning about her community. “I loved learning how Short Pump was named!” Lowe added. “What a funny legend!”

Like Anna Thill, Lia Deasy of Tuckahoe E.S. in the Tuckahoe District wrote about Virginia Randolph, highlighting her key role in establishing Arbor Day in Henrico County, in addition to her contributions to the education of African-Americans. “Her dedication to her work gave us the right to go to school together today,” wrote Deasy. “She taught us that if we do not do something, nothing would change.”

The Varina District first-place winner, DeAyra Oliver of Baker E.S., wrote about the African American community at Gravel Hill that flourished after Quaker John Pleasants freed his slaves and left them his land. Noting that a great grandfather was “one of the fortunate children of slavery who inherited land in Gravel Hill,” Oliver said that her mother grew up hearing stories about the area, and added, “I enjoy how the Gravel Hill community helped to shape my family history.”

From Dale to Vandervall
Among other award recipients recognized at the ceremony were Marcus Rand and Logan Anderson, both of ELES in the Brookland District. Taking second and third place, respectively, the two wrote essays about retiring County Manager Virgil Hazelett (Rand) and the history of Henrico County schools (Anderson).

Treasure Bailey and Justin Cooke, both of Arthur Ashe E.S. and both with essays about Pocahontas, placed second and third in the Fairfield District.

From the Three Chopt District, Sarah Bender of Colonial Trail E.S. took second place with an essay about Pocahontas, and Gretchen Neary of Three Chopt E.S. took third place with a story about Virginia Randolph.

Aliana Ayala’s second-place essay focused on William Leroy Vandervall and the key role he played in the African American community of Quioccasin, where Ayala’s school Pemberton E.S. is located. Also hailing from Pemberton and the Tuckahoe District, third-place winner Davis Buckbee wrote about Henricus from the viewpoint of Sir Thomas Dale.

Chris Bolden wrote about the history of his school, Sandston E.S., to take second place in the Varina District, while third-place winner Daija Tyler of Montrose E.S. focused on the importance of the Civil War.
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Community

Local couple wins wedding at Lewis Ginter


Richmonders Jim Morgan and Dan Stackhouse were married at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden in Lakeside Mar. 7 month after winning the Say I Do! With OutRVA wedding contest in February. The contest was open to LGBT couples in recognition of Virginia’s marriage equality law, which took effect last fall. The wedding included a package valued at $25,000.

Morgan and Stackhouse, who became engaged last fall on the day marriage equality became the law in Virginia, have been together for 16 years. They were selected from among 40 couples who registered for the contest. The winners were announced at the Say I Do! Dessert Soiree at the Renaissance in Richmond in February. > Read more.

Fourth-annual Healy Gala planned


The Fourth Annual Healy Gala will be held Saturday, Apr. 11, at The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

The event was created to honor Michael Healy, a local businessman and community leader who died suddenly in June 2011, and to endow the Mike Healy Scholarship (through the Glen Allen Ruritan Club), which benefits students of Glen Allen High School.

Healy served as the chairman of Glen Allen Day for several years and helped raise thousands of dollars for local charities and organizations. > Read more.

Ruritan Club holding Brunswick stew sale


The Richmond Battlefield Ruritan Club is holding a Brunswick stew sale, with orders accepted through March 13 and pick-up available March 14. The cost is $8 per quart.

Pick-up will be at noon, March 14, at the Richmond Heights Civic Center, 7440 Wilton Road in Varina.

To place an order, call Mike at (804) 795- 7327 or Jim at (804) 795-9116. > Read more.

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Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


Two events this weekend benefit man’s best friend – a rabies clinic, sponsored by the Glendale Ruritan Club, and an American Red Cross Canine First Aid & CPR workshop at Alpha Dog Club. The fifth annual Shelby Rocks “Cancer is a Drag” Womanless Pageant will benefit the American Cancer Society and a spaghetti luncheon on Sunday will benefit the Eastern Henrico Ruritan Club. Twin Hickory Library will also host a used book sale this weekend with proceeds benefiting The Friends of the Twin Hickory Library. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

A taste of Japan

Ichiban offers rich Asian flavors, but portions lack

In a spot that could be easily overlooked is a surprising, and delicious, Japanese restaurant. In a tiny nook in the shops at the corner of Ridgefield Parkway and Pump Road sits a welcoming, warm and comfortable Asian restaurant called Ichiban, which means “the best.”

The restaurant, tucked between a couple others in the Gleneagles Shopping Center, was so quiet and dark that it was difficult to tell if it was open at 6:30 p.m. on a Monday. When I opened the door, I smiled when I looked inside. > Read more.

One beauty of a charmer

Disney’s no-frills, live-action ‘Cinderella’ delights

Cinderella is the latest from Disney’s new moviemaking battle plan: producing live-action adaptations of all their older classics. Which is a plan that’s had questionable results in the past.

Alice in Wonderland bloated with more Tim Burton goth-pop than the inside of a Hot Topic. Maleficent was a step in the right direction, but the movie couldn’t decide if Maleficent should be a hero or a villain (even if she should obviously be a villain) and muddled itself into mediocrity.

Cinderella is much better. Primarily, because it’s just Cinderella. No radical rebooting. No Tim Burton dreck. It’s the 1950 Disney masterpiece, transposed into live action and left almost entirely untouched. > Read more.

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