Henrico’s Top Teachers – Tyler Hart

As the son of a teacher who is now a teacher himself, Tyler Hart – it would be natural to assume – had to have been a school-lover and a model student growing up.

Just the opposite, says Hart.

“I was always the student with the ‘X’s in the ‘talkative’ box on my report card,” he recalls. “I was always out of my seat. I was not a fan of school.”

It wasn’t until Hart graduated from University of Richmond and began working at summer camps and an after-school program that teaching really entered his mind. Taking a job as a permanent substitute at Crestview Elementary, where he often floated to different classrooms helping out, he found himself drawn to special ed classrooms in particular and to the task of motivating and engaging children in general.

Before long, he returned to UR to get his teaching degree – and discovered a textbook by Ron Clark that affected him deeply.

“I had read numerous textbooks for college and graduate classes, but I think The Essential 55 was the first book I read that really let me know that I wanted to be a teacher,” says Hart. “I become enamored with [Clark’s] teaching style. I watched the movie, The Ron Clark Story and became even more motivated. This was a guy showing it’s okay to dance around, rap, and stand on desks.

“It really led me to believe that education can be fun.”

This year, Hart was able to fly to Atlanta and visit The Ron Clark Academy to see his idol teach in person -- an experience he says he will never forget, and hopes to experience again.

It’s clear, if you ask Hart’s students and their parents, that he has not only taken Ron Clark’s philosophy to heart, but has also added his own distinctive spirit and stamp.

He has “a very cool and friendly way of teaching,” said one parent. Under his guidance, many children who professed to hate school and who tested poorly on SOLs have not only improved or passed, but learned to love learning.

“Children are captivated by his style [and energy],” said another parent. “His assignments are thought-provoking and exciting [and] he provides just the right amount of scaffolding, allowing the learners to take off on their own when ready.”

In only the first nine weeks of school, one parent noticed a dramatic change in her child’s self-confidence and attitude towards learning, and credited the improvement to Hart’s unique, hands-on way of teaching and inventive lessons.

“[My child] is excited to learn new things and to see what creative ideas he has for the day,” she said, citing activities that range from making continents out of cookie dough to dropping eggs off the school roof.

Another parent wrote that Hart’s hands-on style helped her daughter to open up and to be less shy in public.

“He really gets the students involved in using the blog page,” said the parent, “[and teaches] students how to be responsible by setting up a manager and having them have use ‘fake money’ to pay for a job.”

Using technology in new and innovative ways in the classroom is one of Hart’s passions, he agrees. At the beginning of the school year, he invests a lot of time in step-by-step teaching of different programs; by the end of the year, he says he is “blown away” at seeing what the students develop.

“It is a blast using these resources to enhance my students’ learning,” he says. “One of my favorite things is when former students come to show off projects they have created in programs that they learned how to use with me.”

When he’s had opportunities to make presentations at professional conferences, Hart adds, he enjoys helping his fellow teachers just as much as students – and says they “get just as excited as an eight-year-old when they learn something new.”

The former classroom chatterbox says that he has taken the opposite approach from his own teachers in his third grade classroom.

“I know most of the time [as a student] I was probably not being productive with my ‘chatter,’” says Hart. “But I welcome chatter in my classroom – within reason. I thoroughly enjoy watching the interactions of my students.”

Hart also enjoys meeting the challenge of taking 25 different personalities from very different backgrounds, and helping each to find the best way to learn the material “and have an awesome time doing it,” he says.

Becoming a teacher has given him a new appreciation of his mother, Peggy Hart, who taught in Henrico County for 30 years. “I didn’t realize,” he says, “how much work she put into her class until I was on the other side of the desk.”

But no matter how daunting the challenges, Hart says, they are far outweighed by teaching’s rewards.

He enjoys, for instance, seeing his students’ reactions when he tells them they will have a substitute next day.

“To hear my students genuinely upset that I won’t be in class the next day,” says Hart, “always puts a smile on my face. I also find myself checking the clock when I am out, thinking, ‘Now they are doing math. Time for art! I hope ‘Billy’ is doing what he is supposed to be doing right now.’”

But the best part about teaching, he insists, is that it never gets stale.

“[Teaching] will never be the same year in and year out. Every year I have to mold and hone my craft based on the students I have,” Hart says.

“In the ever-changing world of education I live by one motto: ‘Embrace change, it’s the only constant.’”
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Dog rescued, no one injured in Northside townhouse fire


MAR. 27, 11 A.M. – No one was injured by a townhouse fire that occurred early Monday morning in the 200 block of Knightsmanor Court, near the intersection of Azalea Avenue and Richmond-Henrico Turnpike.

The first Henrico Fire officials were on scene in less than four minutes and found heavy smoke and flames coming from the two-story townhouse. Firefighters from the first-arriving fire engine and ladder truck made their way to the townhome involved in fire and searched for victims through high heat and reduced visibility. > Read more.

Walk, ceremony to observe Crime Victims’ Rights Week

In observance of National Crime Victims' Rights Week (April 2-8), and to honor victims of crime in Henrico County and raise awareness about crime victims' rights and issues, Henrico County Victim/Witness will hold a commemorative ceremony and informative walk April 5. > Read more.

Bon Secours announces Richmond OB-GYN expansion to Henrico County


Richmond OB-GYN, an obstetrics and gynecology provider of Bon Secours Richmond Health System, will open a new office at Bon Secours Heart and Vascular Institute building in Henrico County. The building, which serves as an extension of Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital, is located in Reynolds Crossing at Forest and Glenside Avenues. The practice opened for patients March 21.

Alice Hirata, M.D., joined the Bon Secours Medical Group and is now part of the physician team at Richmond OB-GYN, where she will help to establish a midwifery practice at St. Mary’s Hospital. > Read more.

Sports Backers, Markel announce partnership for half marathon


Sports Backers announced recently a new three-year partnership with Markel, making the Innsbrook-based insurance provider the new title sponsor of the Markel Richmond Half Marathon. The race, now in its 10th year, is part of the Anthem Richmond Marathon weekend Nov. 11, which also features the VCU Health 8k.

Known as 'American's Friendliest Marathon' and celebrating its 40th anniversary in 2017, the Anthem Richmond Marathon and companion races annually draw participants from all 50 states and dozens of countries around the world. > Read more.

Local, state races beginning to take shape


Candidates for several local and state races are emerging, as both the Henrico Republican and Democratic parties finalize their nominating processes.

In Henrico, a number of candidates are expected to pursue the Brookland District seat on the Board of Supervisors during a special election in November. (The seat opened when longtime Republican board member Dick Glover died at 82 in February). The winner of that election will serve the remainder of Glover's term, which expires at the end of 2019. > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

CAT Theatre to present ‘When There’s A Will’


CAT Theatre and When There’s A Will director Ann Davis recently announced the cast for the dark comedy which will be performed May 26 through June 3.

The play centers around a family gathering commanded by the matriarch, Dolores, to address their unhappiness with Grandmother’s hold on the clan’s inheritance and her unreasonable demands on her family.

Pat Walker will play the part of Dolores Whitmore, with Graham and Florine Whitmore played by Brent Deekens and Brandy Samberg, respectively. > Read more.

 

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Jewish Family Theatre will present “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” March 1-11 at the Weinstein Jewish Community Center. Set to an engaging cornucopia of musical styles, from country-western and calypso to bubble gum rock and rock ‘n roll, this Old Testament tale emerges both timely and timeless. Enjoy dinner with the show on March 8. Tickets are $20 for JCC members, $30 for nonmembers and $15 for seniors and students. For a complete performance schedule and to purchase tickets, visit http://www.weinsteinjcc.org. Full text

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