Henrico’s Top Teachers – Robert Rice

Former students frequently drop by to visit Robert Rice or invite him to lunch, coffee, birthday parties, high school and college graduations. But this year was the first time, he says, that he was invited to the wedding of a former student.

“Not wanting to dwell on how old this made me feel,” he recalls, “I had to ask why was I invited. I was told by the bride, ‘Why wouldn’t I invite my favorite teacher?’”

Touched by the praise, and by being included in such a personal event, Rice went on to have a wonderful time reuniting with former students and their parents at the ceremony. The bride also told him that she was becoming a teacher, and that he was partly responsible for her choosing that path.

Despite the numbers of students who continue to stay in touch, and others who Rice “checks in with” from time to time, he is surprised – and maybe a little amused – that any student would want to contact him after moving on. “They know that just because they leave my classroom, doesn’t mean they’ve left my clutches!”

He is often “floored,” he adds, that the former students still remember things that were done in class years ago. “And they know,” he says, “how easy it is to get me to cry too.”  

A recent encounter that Rice admits drew some tears was related to a civics project that he has assigned for many years. The project requires students to pretend that they are 18 and fresh out of high school, and that they must live on their own for one month. Using the newspaper, internet and job and apartment guides, they must find age-appropriate jobs, apartments for rent, and transportation – then figure out to pay their bills.

As this school year began, Rice received an email from a former student. “She informed me that when her mom lost her job during the summer, they used my project to help budget their household,” he says. “She let me know that my project played a large part in helping them through some pretty tough times.” 

Rice also has a gift for teaching history to his students, who say that he teaches in a way that is interactive and engaging and helps all students understand the material. More than one former student has stated that he or she was never interested in history until having Rice for a teacher.

“But he made history so fun,” wrote one, “that I thoroughly enjoyed going to class. Now, almost five years later, I still attribute my love of history to Mr. Rice.”

One former student called Rice “the most motivational and inspirational teacher I have had” in HCPS, and said he made her “fall in love with history.” He teaches the subject with such enthusiasm, she wrote, that it makes students want to learn.

It was his passion for history that led him to the profession of teaching, says Rice – even though not all of his own teachers were good ones and some he described as “pretty terrible.”

He credits Moody Middle School teacher Bonnie Geiger (now retired) with shaping the way he teaches middle schoolers.

“All through college, I was preparing to teach high school,” says Rice. “When placed at Moody, I thought I was being punished by my advisor. Thankfully, Mrs. Geiger was there to show me that middle school was the best place for me to be.

“I still use her lessons and worksheets in my classes . . . 15 years later.”

Rice drew praise from nominators not only for his skills in the classroom, but also for his participation in PTA and school pageants, and for supporting his students outside of class by cheering them on at after-school activities and athletic events.

Other students expressed appreciation for the tutoring, advice and listening ear he gave them. “He is always there to lend a helping hand to a struggling student,” said one.

When another student was struggling with her feelings over losing a close relative, wrote a parent, she turned to Rice. “Mr. Rice had something about his caring for his students – not just their grades, but overall well-being – that made her think about life and that she still could exist among others and allow them to care.”

Another parent wrote that Rice has a high-energy and creative personality that makes even typically-unmotivated students want to please him, adding that students also bond with Rice because he respects their individuality. “He seems to make a personal connection with every child he teaches,” said the parent, who was echoed by a former student now in high school. “He is not only a phenomenal teacher, but a wonderful friend,” wrote the student. “He still keeps track of my grades and makes sure I am staying focused, even though I am no longer his student. There is no way I could be as successful without him.”

But the parents who have had multiple children in Rice’s classes are perhaps his biggest fans, citing the turnaround they have seen in children who complained about school but began to love it, and the way his students talk about him years after leaving his class. “There is no other teacher that I know,” said one, “[who can so] touch their students intellectually and inspire them with smiles on their faces.”

One parent of several children said that Rice’s impact has filtered down even to her four-year-old, who enjoyed and learned from the projects done by older siblings.

“I think,” she wrote of Rice and his relationship with his students, “that he literally would be their mentor for life.”
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Dog rescued, no one injured in Northside townhouse fire


MAR. 27, 11 A.M. – No one was injured by a townhouse fire that occurred early Monday morning in the 200 block of Knightsmanor Court, near the intersection of Azalea Avenue and Richmond-Henrico Turnpike.

The first Henrico Fire officials were on scene in less than four minutes and found heavy smoke and flames coming from the two-story townhouse. Firefighters from the first-arriving fire engine and ladder truck made their way to the townhome involved in fire and searched for victims through high heat and reduced visibility. > Read more.

Walk, ceremony to observe Crime Victims’ Rights Week

In observance of National Crime Victims' Rights Week (April 2-8), and to honor victims of crime in Henrico County and raise awareness about crime victims' rights and issues, Henrico County Victim/Witness will hold a commemorative ceremony and informative walk April 5. > Read more.

Bon Secours announces Richmond OB-GYN expansion to Henrico County


Richmond OB-GYN, an obstetrics and gynecology provider of Bon Secours Richmond Health System, will open a new office at Bon Secours Heart and Vascular Institute building in Henrico County. The building, which serves as an extension of Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital, is located in Reynolds Crossing at Forest and Glenside Avenues. The practice opened for patients March 21.

Alice Hirata, M.D., joined the Bon Secours Medical Group and is now part of the physician team at Richmond OB-GYN, where she will help to establish a midwifery practice at St. Mary’s Hospital. > Read more.

Sports Backers, Markel announce partnership for half marathon


Sports Backers announced recently a new three-year partnership with Markel, making the Innsbrook-based insurance provider the new title sponsor of the Markel Richmond Half Marathon. The race, now in its 10th year, is part of the Anthem Richmond Marathon weekend Nov. 11, which also features the VCU Health 8k.

Known as 'American's Friendliest Marathon' and celebrating its 40th anniversary in 2017, the Anthem Richmond Marathon and companion races annually draw participants from all 50 states and dozens of countries around the world. > Read more.

Local, state races beginning to take shape


Candidates for several local and state races are emerging, as both the Henrico Republican and Democratic parties finalize their nominating processes.

In Henrico, a number of candidates are expected to pursue the Brookland District seat on the Board of Supervisors during a special election in November. (The seat opened when longtime Republican board member Dick Glover died at 82 in February). The winner of that election will serve the remainder of Glover's term, which expires at the end of 2019. > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

CAT Theatre to present ‘When There’s A Will’


CAT Theatre and When There’s A Will director Ann Davis recently announced the cast for the dark comedy which will be performed May 26 through June 3.

The play centers around a family gathering commanded by the matriarch, Dolores, to address their unhappiness with Grandmother’s hold on the clan’s inheritance and her unreasonable demands on her family.

Pat Walker will play the part of Dolores Whitmore, with Graham and Florine Whitmore played by Brent Deekens and Brandy Samberg, respectively. > Read more.

 

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The Weinstein Jewish Community Center will host a free Community Purim Celebration from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. Come dressed in costume and enjoy free carnival games and prizes, moon bounces, clowns and face-painting, arts and crafts, and more. Food will be available for purchase. The schedule includes Megillah Readings at 11 a.m. (before the carnival) and 12:15 p.m., a costume parade and dance party with DJ Bob at 2 p.m. and a Purim Shpiel presented by Congregation Beth Ahabah at 3 p.m. Bring an individually wrapped food or snack item to donate to Safe Harbor Shelter. For details, visit http://www.weinsteinjcc.org. Full text

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