Henrico trails state averages in SATs, ACTs

Henrico County high school seniors scored above the federal average but below the state average during the 2011-12 school year on the two most prominent college admissions tests, according to results released recently.

Henrico students averaged a composite score of 21.9 out of a possible 36 on the four-part ACT (compared with a state average score of 22.4) and 1501 on the SAT (compared with the state average of 1517).

While expressing their disappointment with the results, school officials offered School Board members several explanations and detailed efforts to improve both sets of scores this year and in the future.

"Certainly we are not happy with the performances, and we know that we have some work to do," Assistant Superintendent of Secondary Education Eric Jones told the board during its Oct. 11 work session.

Jones suggested, though, that since the scores reflect only the final tests given during the school year – and not earlier ones – they may not present a completely accurate representation of student knowledge. Some students, for example, may only be focused on one particular section of a test, if they have already attained high scores in other sections during earlier testing.

But, he conceded, the same would hold true for all students whose scores are reflected in the latest numbers statewide and nationally.

To remedy the disappointing scores, high school principals have initiated a variety of efforts.

Godwin Principal Elizabeth Armbruster told the board that her school has implemented lunch study "boot camps" for students taking the SAT, while math teachers have incorporated SAT-style questions into lessons during the two weeks prior to the test. The school also has marketed SAT resources and events to students and parents more strongly than in the past, she said.

At Varina High, teachers have provided more timed writing exercises for students, Principal Tracie Omohundro said. (Jones had suggested that the lack of such exercises district-wide could have contributed to lower scores on the writing portion of the SAT, which is timed.)

Varina also is encouraging juniors to take the SAT to become familiar with the test, Omohundro said, and the school became a testing site, which she said may have helped relieve stress for students who previously had to take the test at unfamiliar schools.

At Hermitage, students have been exposed to an SAT word and question of the day on the school's TV network, Principal Omega Wilson said. Teachers also offer bonus credit in some classes for students who included that information in some way during class participation.

Several Hermitage teachers also have provided before- and after-school tutoring in English and math, and the school offered a Princeton Review course for students, Wilson said.

Jones suggested that the district needed to focus more on increasing daily academic rigor to develop students who could think analytically, understand broad concepts and solve problems – not just learn how to take standardized tests.

"In many ways, I think we've fallen victim to an SOL culture of doing well on a minimal-level competency multiple-choice test," Jones said.

Though SAT math scores did improve from the previous year, the school system is forming a math advisory board, composed of parents, teachers, administrators, university officials and others, to help review current lessons and recommend possible changes, he said.

School administrators are encouraging students to take the ACT, Jones said, which officials believe is a better evaluation of student knowledge than the SAT. The ACT is now accepted by all Virginia colleges, he said.

Jones suggested that restoring funding to allow all ninth- and tenth-graders to take the PSAT could help boost SAT and ACT scores (by providing students with exposure in advance) and that adding funding for prep courses for students – or training sessions for teachers – also would be helpful.

School Board members asked Jones to return next month with a "wish-list" of several items that they might consider adding to the 2012-13 fiscal year budget.
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HCPS wins national honor for overhaul of Code of Student Conduct, supports


Henrico County Public Schools recently was recognized by the National School Boards Association for a sweeping overhaul of the school division’s approach to student supports. HCPS was one of five large U.S. school systems recognized with a first-place honor in the 2017 Magna Awards, presented Saturday in Denver at the organization’s annual conference. The awards recognize school divisions and leaders “for taking bold and innovative steps to improve the lives of students and their communities,” according to the group.

The award recognizes Henrico Schools’ efforts of the past several years, from re-examining its policies to implementing more support systems. After a two-year conversation with the community through public hearings and other feedback, HCPS adopted a revised Code of Student Conduct for the 2015-16 school year. > Read more.

Environmentalists say budget hurts efforts to protect bay

Environmental groups are outraged at the Trump administration’s proposed funding cuts for Chesapeake Bay cleanup programs.

President Donald Trump’s budget plan, released last week, reduces the budget for the federal Environmental Protection Agency by 31 percent. That includes a $427 million in funding to address regional pollution, such as the Chesapeake Bay protection efforts. The proposed budget would eliminate funding for the EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Program, which received $73 million from the federal government in 2016. > Read more.

Glen Allen ES principal receives REB Award


Melissa Halquist-Pruden, principal of Henrico County’s Glen Allen Elementary School, earned the 2016-17 REB Award for Distinguished Educational Leadership. The Community Foundation presents the award to four principals annually – one each from the school systems of Henrico, Chesterfield and Hanover counties and one from the city of Richmond schools.

The award recognizes principals who go beyond the day-to-day demands of their jobs to create an exceptional educational environment. The award stresses management and communication skills, and the ability to inspire, encourage and advocate for the school. > Read more.

Grant to help Hermitage H.S. upgrade CTE program equipment


Governor Terry McAuliffe announced recently that Henrico County’s Hermitage H.S. will be among 16 high schools and technical centers statewide to receive a grant to upgrade equipment for career and technical education (CTE) programs.

The program gives priority to challenged schools, Governor's STEM Academies and Governor's Health Science Academies. Each school or center will receive $37,500 to purchase new equipment and make other necessary improvements. At Hermitage, the funds will be used for precision machining equipment. > Read more.

Virginia raises a toast to George Washington’s whiskey


George Washington is recognized as the father of our country, but with a bill signed into law by Gov. Terry McAuliffe, Washington also will be recognized under another title – distiller of Virginia’s official liquor.

SB 1261, sponsored by Sen. Adam Ebbin of Alexandria, adds a “state spirit” to the list of the commonwealth’s official emblems and designations and crowns George Washington’s rye whiskey with the title.

The bill, which McAuliffe signed last week, highlights George Washington’s contributions to the culture of Virginia as “a native son of Virginia born on February 22, 1732, in Pope’s Creek”; “the first American president, commander of the Continental Army, and president of the Constitutional Convention”; and “a model statesman ... universally acknowledged as the father of our nation.” > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

Metro Diner to open second Henrico location


Metro Diner, a comfort food concept, will open its second Henrico location next month. The company is accepting job applications for its Libbie Place location at 5626 West Broad Street. The diner concept, known for its fried chicken and waffles, meatloaf, and shrimp and grits, will bring 100 new jobs to the region as it plans to open its doors in April.

The 3,500-square-foot diner located in the Libbie Place Shopping Center will seat more than 100 and serve classic comfort food staples with a twist, such as fried chicken and waffles topped with strawberry butter and a stuffed challah bread French toast with strawberry and blueberry compote. > Read more.

 

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