Henrico students begin James River journey

Every student in Virginia should have a meaningful watershed experience before graduating, but the James River Association is taking that experience one step further with its second James River Expedition program, said trip leader Gabe Silver.

“Our goal is really to take someone when they’re young and give them an experience that really stands out in their memory, to take someone not necessarily who is going to go into conservation or environmental field, but someone who is going to go far in life and is going to be a leader, and show them how important and core our water resources
are,” he said.

Last year, 12 students and four teachers from Virginia high schools participated in a 28-day canoe trip down the 340-mile James River. This year's trip schedule has been separated into three sections to allow five more schools to participate, including Varina High School and J.R. Tucker High School from Henrico County.

Each trip will be eight days long and students, teachers and JRA officials will be canoeing between 10-24 miles a day, Silver said.

“This is not by any means an easy trip it is a physically challenging trip and intentionally so,” Silver said. “It gets everyone out of their comfort zone.”

The opportunity is sponsored by a $50,000 grant from The Dominion Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Dominion Resources.

Varina Biology II teacher Melinda VanDevelder received an email in January from the Henrico County secondary science education specialist, Libby Kitten, about the program and immediately applied.

“A weeklong vacation on the James River, are you kidding, it’s awesome,” VanDevelder said. “If there’s a river, I’m getting in it.”

Students on every leg will stop to talk to experts about history and the ecology of the river and its conservation challenges, Silver said. VanDevelder will be teaching about endocrine disrupters, water testing and fisheries to her group, which travels from Lynchburg to Richmond July 7-14. Students will snorkel to look at the fish before learning about the problems facing their species, she said.

“I’m looking forward to watching them experience the river in a completely different way,” she said. “It’s not every day you get to see clear water, especially in Varina. I’m ready for some light bulb moments.”

Silver said, the trip would help to build leadership skills as students rotate jobs including a trip leader in charge of researching what is coming up the next day, trip scientist in charge of recording GPS coordinates of any potential ecological problems they see along the river, the trip reporter who will take photos and write an article, and the camp leaders who will cook and set up camp.

Most of the students are rising 10th and 11th graders, Silver said. When they return they will put together a project to demonstrate what they learned, said J.R. Tucker Biology teacher Jane Selden, who leaves July 21 for her trip down the last section of the James from Richmond to Hampton.

Students and teachers prepared for the trip the first weekend in June with safety and camp training, Bodary said. Despite being an avid kayaker, Bodary said that for this trip she has had to prepare herself for the length and cooperation involved in the expedition.

“I’ll have to buy a whole new wardrobe, some synthetic shorts, not the usually holey cotton ones I wear,” she said. “I’ll have to be putting on sun block all day. I’ll probably be a crispy little critter. But I think the biggest thing is planning to pack for seven days.”

Seldon said she’d been going to the gym to strengthen her upper body to prepare.

“I’m not a camper, so this is going to be a little new to me,” she said. “I’m really wanted this experience for my students. They’re so excited.”

The first group left June 23 and will return June 30. You can follow its progress on Facebook and at http://jamesriverassociation.org/expedition.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

HCPS wins national honor for overhaul of Code of Student Conduct, supports


Henrico County Public Schools recently was recognized by the National School Boards Association for a sweeping overhaul of the school division’s approach to student supports. HCPS was one of five large U.S. school systems recognized with a first-place honor in the 2017 Magna Awards, presented Saturday in Denver at the organization’s annual conference. The awards recognize school divisions and leaders “for taking bold and innovative steps to improve the lives of students and their communities,” according to the group.

The award recognizes Henrico Schools’ efforts of the past several years, from re-examining its policies to implementing more support systems. After a two-year conversation with the community through public hearings and other feedback, HCPS adopted a revised Code of Student Conduct for the 2015-16 school year. > Read more.

Environmentalists say budget hurts efforts to protect bay

Environmental groups are outraged at the Trump administration’s proposed funding cuts for Chesapeake Bay cleanup programs.

President Donald Trump’s budget plan, released last week, reduces the budget for the federal Environmental Protection Agency by 31 percent. That includes a $427 million in funding to address regional pollution, such as the Chesapeake Bay protection efforts. The proposed budget would eliminate funding for the EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Program, which received $73 million from the federal government in 2016. > Read more.

Glen Allen ES principal receives REB Award


Melissa Halquist-Pruden, principal of Henrico County’s Glen Allen Elementary School, earned the 2016-17 REB Award for Distinguished Educational Leadership. The Community Foundation presents the award to four principals annually – one each from the school systems of Henrico, Chesterfield and Hanover counties and one from the city of Richmond schools.

The award recognizes principals who go beyond the day-to-day demands of their jobs to create an exceptional educational environment. The award stresses management and communication skills, and the ability to inspire, encourage and advocate for the school. > Read more.

Grant to help Hermitage H.S. upgrade CTE program equipment


Governor Terry McAuliffe announced recently that Henrico County’s Hermitage H.S. will be among 16 high schools and technical centers statewide to receive a grant to upgrade equipment for career and technical education (CTE) programs.

The program gives priority to challenged schools, Governor's STEM Academies and Governor's Health Science Academies. Each school or center will receive $37,500 to purchase new equipment and make other necessary improvements. At Hermitage, the funds will be used for precision machining equipment. > Read more.

Virginia raises a toast to George Washington’s whiskey


George Washington is recognized as the father of our country, but with a bill signed into law by Gov. Terry McAuliffe, Washington also will be recognized under another title – distiller of Virginia’s official liquor.

SB 1261, sponsored by Sen. Adam Ebbin of Alexandria, adds a “state spirit” to the list of the commonwealth’s official emblems and designations and crowns George Washington’s rye whiskey with the title.

The bill, which McAuliffe signed last week, highlights George Washington’s contributions to the culture of Virginia as “a native son of Virginia born on February 22, 1732, in Pope’s Creek”; “the first American president, commander of the Continental Army, and president of the Constitutional Convention”; and “a model statesman ... universally acknowledged as the father of our nation.” > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


For our Top 10 calendar events this weekend, click here! > Read more.

 

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Mothers Against Drunk Driving will present its annual Walk Like MADD 5k Dash/Walk from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Dorey Park, 2999 Darbytown Rd. Walk Like MADD honors those killed or injured in impaired driving crashes. Funds raised support victim services and educational events in Virginia. Check-in starts at 8 a.m. For details, call 353-7121 x5153 or visit http://www.walklikemadd.org/richmond. Full text

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