HCPS interns develop software prototype

Two Henrico County students have spent their summer internships creating a working prototype of an online application system for students applying to the county’s high school specialty centers.

The interns and management of eTelic Inc., the information technology firm that hosted the interns this summer, estimate that an automated system could save students, teachers and administrators as many as 20,000 total hours per year currently spent using the paper-based application process. Printing and paper costs for all also would be substantially reduced.

Jack Palen, a recent Maggie L. Walker Governor’s School graduate headed to the University of Michigan, and Shravan Ravishankar, a rising senior at Deep Run High School, developed the online software application during their four-week internship using eTelic’s proprietary rapid software application generator called Turanto.

According to Lynne Norris, department chairperson of Deep Run’s Center for Information Technology, the real-world experience provided to Palen and Ravishankar in this endeavor will prove invaluable as they transition to college and a job after academics.

“This type of experience allows a student to see beyond school and experience what a business goes through in working to solve a real problem for itself or for a customer,” Norris said. “Not many students have an opportunity to do that prior to entering the job market, which everyone knows is getting more competitive each year.”

The two students are planning to schedule a presentation to HCPS officials in order to demonstrate the prototype, hoping it will assist county management in determining the scope and value of automating the current system in the future. An online system could replace the paper-based system used by 3,700 students per year as well as hundreds of teachers and administrators who submit transcripts and recommendations for eighth-grade applicants to the county’s high school specialty centers.

“Normally this type of software program would take an experienced programmer working full time up to six months to create,” said eTelic president Mukul Paithane. “It is remarkable that these two bright students built this complex, data-driven software application in only four weeks, and with minimal programming. Jack and Shravan were able to use their limited time focusing on analyzing a real-world ‘business problem’ and developing a practical solution to replace a paper-based application process, saving time and money for everyone involved.”

Further development of the prototype would allow Henrico County eighth-grade students, teachers and administrators to complete, submit and review various documents online, including the application itself, along with other documents such as transcripts and teacher recommendations. They would be provided with secure access to the system in order to process information needed from them. Specialty Center school admissions officials would then use the system to access all information used to make decisions on which students should be admitted into various magnet schools.

“From my experience in using the current paper system, I know that an automated process would save other students tremendous amounts of time when applying, and the cost-savings for the county should be significant as well,” said County Intern Coordinator Robert Stephens.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Therapeutic healing


In a room labeled the garden room, a bright space with lavender-colored walls and pebble-gray chairs, art therapist Becky Jacobson might ask her patients to imagine a safe place, but she doesn’t ask them to describe it to her — she wants them to draw it.

The patients are free to draw whatever they envision, expressing themselves through their colored markers, a form of healing through art therapy.

“Some people might not feel safe anywhere because they have had hard things happening to them, and I have the background to help that person reground and feel safe in the group,” Jacobson said. > Read more.

Eight’s enough? Crowded race for 56th District develops


Following the retirement of Delegate Peter Farrell [R-56th District], a number of candidates have thrown their hats into the ring to vie for the open seat in the Virginia General Assembly district, which contains a portion of Henrico’s Far West End.

Democratic challengers include Lizzie Basch and Melissa Dart, while Republican contenders include George Goodwin, Matt Pinsker, Graven Craig, Surya Dhakar, Jay Prendergrast and John McGuire. In addition to a section of Henrico, the district also includes portions of Goochland and Spotsylvania County, as well as all of Louisa County. > Read more.

On the trail to Awareness


Twenty-five teams, composed of some 350 participants, gathered at Dorey Park in Varina April 8 for the Walk Like MADD 5k, to benefit Mothers Against Drunk Driving Virginia. The event raised more than $35,000, with more funds expected to come in through May 7. > Read more.

Leadership Metro Richmond honors St. Joseph’s Villa CEO


Leadership Metro Richmond honored St. Joseph's Villa CEO Kathleen Burke Barrett, a 2003 graduate of LMR, with its 2017 Ukrop Community Vision Award during its annual spring luncheon April 6.

The award honors a LMR member who demonstrates a purposeful vision, a sense of what needs to be done, clear articulation with concern and respect for others with demonstrated action and risk-taking. > Read more.

Glen Allen H.S. takes second in statewide economics competition

Glen Allen H.S. was among six top schools in the state to place in the 2017 Governor’s Challenge in Economics and Personal Finance.

Taught by Patricia Adams, the Glen Allen H.S. team was runner-up in the Economics division, in which teams faced off in a Quiz Bowl. > Read more.

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April 2017
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The READ Center will hold new tutor training to become an Adult Literacy Tutor from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. April 18-19 at Partnership for Families, 800 W. Graham Rd. If you can read this, you can help someone who can’t. More than 65,000 adults in the Richmond metro area cannot read well enough to function in today’s society. The READ Center helps adults with low literacy skills (in Richmond, Henrico and Chesterfield) develop reading and communication skills through classroom and one-to-one tutoring. You must attend both sessions. For details, visit http://www.readcenter.org or email Dawniece Trumbo at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Full text

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