Giving voice to children’s causes

Gala honors advocates for youngsters, encourages others to join the effort
Take seven founders of Voices for Virginia's Children, a former Virginia governor, three former Virginia first ladies, a congressman, a state senator, and what have you got?

At Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden on Oct. 23, the gathering produced not only a gala celebration for the first-ever recipients of the Carol S. Fox Making Kids Count Award, but an opportunity for long-time child advocates to renew their dedication to the cause.

One such advocate, Rob Dugger, co-founded a national organization in 2006 that partners with business leaders to promote investment in early childhood development. The group, ReadyNation, has focused its efforts on collecting evidence of the economic and societal benefits of interventions in early childhood – from housing, nutrition and health care to parenting education and preschool programs.

As managing partner of Hanover Investment Group, Dugger is immersed in the world of high finance and in the task of helping asset management companies navigate shifting economic conditions.

But his real passion, Dugger noted, is uniting business leaders behind the vision of giving young children a good start in life today – with the understanding that it will pay off in a better society and stronger workforce tomorrow.

"What gets businessmen to tune into [this message] is a whole lot of people saying This is important," Dugger emphasized. "And what fires me up is what I see going on in the rest of the world.

"The rest of the world," he pointed out, "is focusing on investing in children."

Pebbles and ripples
Johanna Schuchert (pictured, far right), the individual recipient of the first Carol S. Fox award, became a champion for children's causes when she was a young mother in the 1970s.

"I learned about the issue of child abuse . . . through the Virginia Federation of Women's Clubs," Schuchert told the crowd at the gala. "I wanted to do something more."

Thirty years later, after helping to found Prevent Child Abuse Virginia (PCAV), she serves as the organization's executive director. Among PCAV's community-based prevention programs is the model program Healthy Families Virginia, which provides home visiting and parent education services to vulnerable first-time parents.

"We've all been doing this together," Schuchert told the audience in receiving her award. "Often you were the pebbles and I was the ripple, but none of us was doing this alone."

Greg Peters, president and chief executive officer of United Methodist Family Services, echoed Schuchert's theme of working together as he accepted the organizational award for UMFS.

Founded 112 years ago as an orphanage, UMFS has transformed itself into a statewide non-profit providing a variety of foster care and adoption services, treatment and education programs for troubled youth and special needs children, and family support and preservation services. In 2011, Peters told the crowd, the organization served 1100 youth and helped 344 families stay together – in addition to partnering with Fairfax County to establish Leland House.

Forging partnerships in the community, Peters emphasized, has been key to the success of UMFS. "The community is beginning to see us as something more than a service provider. . . Together we can make a difference [and do things] we can't do alone."

Like Schuchert, Peters also had praise for the efforts of the organization's supporters and staff.

"The heroes in this room," he said, "are the staff and the board of UMFS. They will do whatever it takes, and they do it because they believe in the children and the families they serve."

Not ready to learn
The Carol S. Fox award, which will be presented annually by Voices for Virginia's Children, was named for a founder and long-time board member at Voices and honors an individual and an organization that have demonstrated exemplary effort to improve the lives of Virginia's children.

At the reception, Fox took a few moments to trace her involvement with children's causes back to her days living in West Point in the 1970s, when she was inspired to establish a child development center.

"We know the most important development of the brain is in the first three years," Fox reminded the crowd. "But there was no public kindergarten [then], and some kids started school not ready to learn ... and were disruptive."

In 1987, after 25 years in West Point, Fox moved to Richmond and got involved with a similar program at the William Byrd Community Center. That led her to help found the Action Alliance for Virginia’s Children and Youth (later changed to Voices for Virginia's Children), a non-partisan research and advocacy organization that serves as the Kids Count data center for Virginia.

"It's the first place Virginia legislators turn to for information ... about Virginia's most vulnerable population," said Fox.

In his welcoming remarks, Voices Executive Director John Morgan highlighted the Kids Count program as well, pointing out that Voices is known "for our bipartisan credibility and our bipartisan voice." In meetings with policy-makers, Morgan added, "sometimes we are the only group in the room that is independent. We have no stake except helping children.

"We are very proud to be the home of Virginia Kids Count. "

Recommitment and resolve
Among the Voices founders and supporters recognized in addition to Fox were former Virginia first ladies Jinx Holton, Anne Holton, and Jeannie Baliles, as well as former governor Linwood Holton. Board member Eleanor Saslaw was accompanied at the gala by her husband, Senator Dick Saslaw; and Congressman Bobby Scott received special mention for an award he earned from First Focus Campaign for Children.

It was the second consecutive year that Scott has received the national "Champion for Children” award, said Morgan – and he was the only member of the Virginia delegation to do so.

While the economic and political climate continue to pose challenges, noted one speaker in summing up, the passion in the room at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden made it clear that those challenges could be overcome.

"Rather than get discouraged," said Greg Peters, "we've got to increase our resolve."

Quoting Mahatma Gandhi – "Be the change you wish to see in the world" – Schuchert agreed.

"No one can do everything, but everyone can do something," said Schuchert.

"I hope this gathering can be a celebration – and a recommitment to what we’re doing."
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RVA Polar Plunge raises $40k for Special Olympics


More than 300 participants took the plunge for charity Feb. 25 at The Shops at Willow Lawn, raising $40,000 for the Special Olympics of Virginia as part of the 2017 RVA Polar Plunge Fest. Participants jumped into frigid water as part of the event, having raised money through donations leading up to the event.

“At Special Olympics Virginia, our vision is to inspire the first unified generation; a generation of people who respectfully include each other in the school, in the workplace, in the community,” said Rick Jeffrey, Special Olympics Virginia President. “Plunging this past Saturday included people with intellectual disabilities and those without; people of all ages, genders, races and religions; students and teachers; doctors and lawyers; military and law enforcement; one for all; all for one." > Read more.

Fundraiser bags more than $50k


CancerLINC's 11th annual "It’s in the Bag" event raised more than $50,000. The event, presented by Virginia Cancer Institute, was held at The Westin Richmond in Henrico Feb. 2 and was attended by more than 200 people.

“It's in the Bag” included handbag designer Thaddeus DuBois and his family from Syracuse, Ind. DuBois brought four handcrafted handbags, which were auctioned off and raised more than $4,000. Three autographed handbags from “Sex and the City” star Sarah Jessica Parker also brought funds. > Read more.

A date with states


Above, Varina’s Andre Watkins drives to the basket during the Blue Devils’ 52-51 win against Hampton in the Group 5A third-place game at Hermitage High School Feb. 25. Below, Tyrese Jenkins drives to the basket during the game. The Blue Devils (21-6 on the season), who earlier last month defeated Hermitage, 53-34, to earn a spot in the 5A state tournament, next will face Albemarle in that tournament. It is the program’s first trip to the state tournament since 2001 and first under fourth-year coach Andrew Lacey, who has turned around a team that was 6-14 during his first season. > Read more.

Future public servants observe lawmaking firsthand


For the past two months, they showed up every day at the state Capitol, dressed in matching blazers and carrying pen and paper at the ready – the next generation of public servants carefully observing their superiors.

These young adults are known as pages. They are middle school and high school students from around Virginia who assist in everyday tasks at the General Assembly to experience firsthand how the legislative process works.

The program dates as far back as 1850, when the one page who worked was paid $2 a day. > Read more.

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CRLC is scheduled to close on the purchase of the property May 31, and is asking community members to help support the site's acquisition. All donations will help CRLC leverage $1 million in matching funds. > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


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NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


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Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


Given the warm weather lately, Saturday’s RVA Polar Plunge Winter Fest, benefiting Special Olympics Virginia, might actually be enjoyable! Other weekend events you’re sure to enjoy include the 14th annual Richmond Kids Expo at the Richmond Raceway Complex, the Richmond Symphony and The Taters in concert at The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen, and the Richmond Ballet Minds in Motion Team XXL performing at the Henrico Theatre. This is also the last weekend to check out HATTheatre’s production of “Bill W. and Dr. Bob.” For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

 

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Henrico County Recreation and Parks will host Legendary Dance Night for ages 18+ from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Eastern Henrico Recreation Center. Dance the night away honoring music legends Aretha Franklin, Luther Vandross, Prince and Motown’s greatest entertainers. Don’t miss the Soul Train and other popular line dances. Cost is $10. For details, call 652-1408. Full text

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