Freedoms celebrated

Abdullin and Tursunay Rozieva Ababekr with Rebiya Kadeer (center).

It’s not often that someone who begins her career as a laundress ends up rising to international fame, but on Jan. 16, such a person came to Richmond for the First Freedom Awards gala.

Sponsored by the First Freedom Center and held at the Richmond Marriott, the annual awards ceremony honored four renowned advocates of religious freedom. Human-rights activist Rebiya Kadeer, who was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006, received the International First Freedom Award for her efforts on behalf of Chinese minorities and her leadership in the Uyghur self-determination movement.

An exiled Uyghur [pronounced WEE-gur] from the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Kadeer rose from humble beginnings to create an import/export empire, and now heads the World Uyghur Congress. For her efforts to end economic and cultural discrimination against Chinese Uyghurs, she spent six years in prison.

Among the Kadeer admirers attending the gala were Henrico residents Abdullin and Tursunay Rozieva Ababekri, the Richmond region’s only Uyghur immigrants.

The occasion was a reunion of sorts, since Abdullin Ababekri met Kadeer 30 years ago in their homeland of China. But Ababekri eventually left China for Uzbekistan – for the same reason that many Uyghurs leave.

“The Uyghur people are not free in China,” Ababekri’s wife, Tursunay, explained to her dinner companions at the gala. “Even if you finish college, the very good jobs, you don’t get. The Chinese do.”

Another common practice of the Chinese is to recruit groups of young Uyghur girls for employment, who then end up having to sell themselves to survive.

“The Chinese,” said Tursunay, “are destroying the Uyghur people in all different ways.”

‘Dragon Fighter'
In her acceptance speech, Kadeer used a translator to elaborate on the types of religious and cultural discrimination Uyghurs face, in addition to economic.

“China will hunt you down and persecute you and your family,” said Kadeer, whose two imprisoned sons are currently serving seven- and nine-year sentences in the PRC. “The Uyghur Muslims face the harshest [discrimination] because of their faith in Islam. [The Chinese] turn mosques into pig farms; they indoctrinate youth that religion is poison.”

The events of Sept. 11, 2001 only intensified the hostility of the Chinese toward Uyghur Muslims, added Kadeer, even though she described the Uyghurs as moderate Sunni Muslims.

“They used 9/11 to further justify their oppression. China is an equal opportunity oppressor of all religions,” she said, expressing contempt for the “bankrupt ideology” of the Chinese and their worship of power and money. “Religious freedom exists only on paper. “

Although Kadeer was once invited by the Chinese government to join both the National People’s Congress and the Political Consultative Congress, and in 1995 was a member of China’s delegation to the United Nations’ Fourth World Conference on Women, she was stripped of her memberships and imprisoned after trying to meet with a visiting delegation from the United States.

After six years – two of them in solitary confinement – she was released due to international pressure. Today she lives in the United States, and is the author of Dragon Fighter: One Woman’s Epic Struggle for Peace with China and frequent op-ed essays.

Dream come true
Tursunay Ababekri’s parents moved to Russia in 1962. In China, her mother’s family had been fairly well-off, she said; but family members were revolutionaries who resisted the Chinese.

“The Chinese were trying to destroy them,” said Tursunay. “My mother’s family, they left everything, took the children to Russia and started over.”

Abdullin and Tursunay Ababekri married in 1991, and although life was better than in China, Abdullin thought often of moving to the United States.

“He had friends [in the States] who called,” Tursunay said. “They kept telling him if he came, it would be good for his kids’ future.”

Eventually, Abdullin made his way to the U.S.; Tursunay stayed with the children for awhile and later joined him. Today, their four children are 20, 19, 14 and four and attend George Mason University, James Madison University, Godwin High School, and preschool.

Although her children like living here in the States, Tursunay admitted to some homesickness.

“Here there is more freedom; it is easy to find a job,” she pointed out. “But life is more stressful.”

“We grew up in a very different atmosphere,” Tursunay went on. “All the relatives are not here; it is just us two. I miss my parents; the kids miss their grandparents. But that doesn’t mean I don’t like it here.”

Abdullin’s mother, mother-in-law, stepmother, three sisters and brother are all still in China, said Tursunay.

“But he wished all his life to go someplace like the United States,” Tursunay said of her husband. “So his dream came true.”

And she had to admit, said Tursunay, that hearing from Rebiya Kadeer and seeing her receive an international award was inspiring.

As for Kadeer, she found the celebration of National Religious Freedom Day with her new friends from the First Freedom Center to be nothing short of invigorating.

“I cannot agree more with the purpose of this center,” she exclaimed to the audience, noting that she sometimes gets “lonely and a little bit hopeless” in her struggles to raise awareness of the plight of Chinese minorities.

“When I get to a place like [this] and see the smiling faces of all religions,” she said, “I get inspired and strengthened to stand up against the tyranny. I get energized and ready to fight again for freedom!”
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Henrico Police arrest 2 Georgia men in connection with January murder


Henrico Police have arrested and charged two Georgia men with first-degree murder in connection with the Jan. 18 murder of 36-year-old Lamont Cornelius Baldwin in the 1200 block of Dominion Townes Terrace.

Antonio Tyrone Johnson (above, left) and Santonio Rodrigus Brown (above, right), both 24 and both of Atlanta, were charged. Johnson also was charged with use of a firearm in commission of a felony and possession of a firearm by a felon. > Read more.

Man struck and killed in western Henrico hit-and-run

A 24-year-old man died after being struck by a hit-and-run driver in western Henrico April 23.

The victim, Emmanuel Isaiah DeJesus, was found lying on the side of the roadway at about 10:25 p.m., April 23 near Patterson Avenue and Palace Way. He was transported to a local hospital, where he was pronounced dead. > Read more.

Henrico woman earns national pharmacy fellowship


Henrico County native Nilofar “Nellie” Jafari recently was named the American College of Clinical Pharmacy-American Society of Health-System Pharmacists-Virginia Commonwealth University Congressional Healthcare Policy Fellow for 2017-18.

Jafari is a 2007 graduate of J.R. Tucker High School.

Pharmacists selected for the fellowship have the opportunity to gain real-world insight into health care policy analysis and development via immersion in the congressional environment. > Read more.

Section of Lauderdale Drive to be closed April 26 for drainage improvements


The westbound lanes of Lauderdale Drive will be closed between John Rolfe Parkway and Cambridge Drive on Wednesday, April 26 for drainage improvements.

The lanes are expected to be closed from approximately 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Motorists will be detoured from westbound Lauderdale onto John Rolfe, Gayton Road and Cambridge before being directed back onto Lauderdale. > Read more.

Henrico Police to host prescription drug take-back event April 29


The Henrico County Division of Police and the U. S. Drug Enforcement Administration will participate in the nationwide Prescription Drug Take Back Program Saturday, April 29. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Henrico County Training Center, 7701 East Parham Road, next to the Public Safety Building.

The program is free and anonymous. Unused or expired pills, patches and liquid prescriptions (in their sealed original container) will be accepted. Needles and sharp items will not be accepted. No questions will be asked. > Read more.
Community

YMCA event will focus on teen mental health


The YMCA, in partnership with the Cameron K. Gallagher Foundation and PartnerMD, will host a free event May 2 to help parents learn how to deal with teen mental health issues. “When the Band-Aid Doesn’t Fix It: A Mom’s Perspective on Raising a Child Who Struggles” will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Shady Grove Family YMCA,11255 Nuckols Road. The event will focus on education, awareness, and understanding the issues facing teens today. > Read more.

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.
Entertainment

Restaurant Watch


Find out how your favorite dining establishments fared during their most recent inspections by the Virginia Department of Health. > Read more.

 

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Dr. Douglas Ottafi will visit River Road Presbyterian Church Mar. 31 through Apr. 2 to speak about the topic "Who is Jesus Christ?" Ottafi will speak Mar. 31 at 3 p.m. at Union Seminary in a lecture that is open to the public. The following day, from 9:30 a.m. to noon, Ottafi will make a presentation at River Road Presbyterian Church, 8960 River Road. On Apr. 2, from 10 to 10:50 a.m., Ottafi will speak to the Adult Sunday School and then make a presentation at the church from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Ottafi, the author of numerous books and articles, is the Craig Family Distinguished Professor of Reformed Theology and Justice at Davidson College, past president of the Society of Christian Ethics and former professor of theology and ethics at Union Presbyterian Seminary. For details, contact the church at 740-7083 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Full text

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