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Forum addresses healthcare changes for businesses

The Supreme Court spoke loud and clear almost a month ago when it upheld the entire Affordable Care Act (ACA) as constitutional in a monumental decision that will affect businesses and individuals alike.

Businesses in the Richmond area are now left trying to decipher and understand the complexities of the bill and how it will affect them and insurance carriers.

“Whether you represent small, large, public or nonprofit entities, we’re all going to be effected as employers and consumers,” Greater Richmond Chamber of Commerce and BB&T Insurance Services of Virginia executive Seth Roth said during a panel discussion about healthcare reform July 19 at the Anthem Headquarters in Henrico.

The discussion, hosted by the Chamber to address the changes that come with the ACA, involved four leading experts who spoke on behalf of various health-related businesses to assist in the understanding of what the decision means and what local companies need to do to move forward.

The ACA essentially will make going without insurance something that is taxable by the government, while enlisting new laws that employers must comply with or face penalties. Many of the ACA changes have started to take effect this year.

Employers now will be required to complete W2 reporting on the cost of employer-sponsored group health care coverage.

For the W2 reporting a section will be added to box 12 to include a new code “DD” that reports the costs of employee sponsored healthcare coverage.

Anthem and other health insurers in Virginia already are dealing with the new laws, as rebate checks are being mailed to customers for not spending enough of health premiums on medical costs under some health plans.

The medical loss ratio rebates issued to consumers require insurance companies to spend a certain percentage of premium dollars on medical care and health care improvement. The rebates have to be distributed as taxable income to employers, said Susan Maley Rash, vice president at BB&T Benefit Consultants of Virginia.

Employers also must cover specific preventative health services for women with exceptions applying to religious employers. Employers also must have offer a $2,500 maximum contribution to healthcare flexible spending (FSA) plans and enlist new Medicare taxes, which will be increased by nine percent.

There also will be a tax on unearned income for high-income individuals and couples.

Opinions on law split
One of the ACA decisions that already has been implemented and will remain in effect is the requirement to cover adult children until age 26 and the requirement of non-grandfathered plans to cover certain preventative care services without cost-sharing.

By 2014, people may no longer be declined for pre-existing conditions, and there will be a modified community rating for small groups and individuals.

The rates will be based upon family tier, age, geography and tobacco use. The change is designed to decrease insurance rates for those who are older and increase rates for insured younger people.

“The healthcare reform laws were needed,” said Mckinley Tucker, CEO of Risk and Identity Solutions, a Henrico-based small business.

“We are the only industrialized nation without healthcare and I think people should try to get some of the emotion out of the issue and look at the positives,” Tucker said. “My daughter is 23 years old and was in the hospital over 20 times between Feb. 14 and now, and she has more pre-existing conditions than you could imagine. As a retired teacher, I was thinking about taking a job to help her pay for her insurance because it would go up. But with the new law she can stay on my insurance until 26 and I can keep her on the plan for as long as I can.”

Not everyone is so optimistic about the ACA; larger companies of 50 employees or more may have to deal with penalties.

Beginning in 2014, there will be an employer penalty for not offering minimum coverage, as well as an employer tax for not offering minimum coverage and an annual insurer fee for fully insured businesses.

If companies have less than 25 full-time employees who each make an average of less than $50,000, there is a credit allowable for a two-year period but only if coverage is purchased through the exchange.

“We will probably benefit from the new law,” said Charles E. McCabe, president and CEO of People’s Tax in Glen Allen. “I have about 15 full-time and 20 seasonal employees so we’re below 50 employees and will not be affected by the penalties, and we pay 50 percent of the employees’ health care now.”

Tax credits will help small businesses and nonprofit organizations, and the credits currently total as much as 35 percent of the businesses’ health premiums but will increase to 50 percent in 2014.

However medium to large businesses - those with at least 50 full-time employees - will not benefit because the “pay or play” penalty will be enacted. Certain employers that either don’t offer health care or do not meet the law’s test for affordability will face penalties.

It is possible that changes could be made to the ACA through future legislation or court rulings; however, the health care reform law is currently in effect and employers should continue to prepare for ACA changes that will become effective in the next two years. For answers to many of the big questions, carriers and employers will have to wait until after the election in November.
Community

Gayton Baptist Church dedicates new outreach center


The John Rolfe YMCA and Gayton Baptist Church have partnered in an effort to bring greater health and wellness opportunities to the community.

Through this partnership, the John Rolfe Y will run Youth Winter Sports programs, including basketball and indoor soccer, in Gayton’s newly renovated $5.5 million outreach center that features a new gymnasium, youth and teen space, social space with café, meeting space and full service commercial kitchen. > Read more.

Henricus Historical Park to host Publick Day Sept. 20

Henricus Historical Park will commemorate its anniversary during Publick Day, a signature annual event that celebrates the establishment of the second successful English settlement in the New World. In September 1611, Sir Thomas Dale, along with soldiers, tradesmen and farmers, ventured from Jamestown to create the Citie of Henricus. Leaders of Henricus developed the first English hospital, chartered the first college in North America, established tobacco as the first cash crop in Virginia, and created a place where Pocahontas lived and met John Rolfe.

Publick Day will take place Saturday, Sept. 20, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free and parking is $5 per vehicle. > Read more.

Commonwealth Parenting, CMoR-Short Pump to present 6-part parenting forum series

As part of its 30th anniversary year and partnership with the Children's Museum of Richmond, Commonwealth Parenting will present a six-part RVA Parents Forum Series to address some of the toughest issues confronting parents.

Parenting experts and family educators will tackle topics ranging from bullying to alcohol, sex to divorce, and technology and stress. Parents will learn how to identify potential problems.

"We're excited about bringing this much-needed forum series to parents in central Virginia. Through our valuable partnership with Commonwealth Parenting, we can have a deeper impact in the community through parent and caregiver education," said Karen Coltrane, president and CEO of the Children's Museum of Richmond. > Read more.

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Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


Check out these three B’s in Henrico this weekend: books, bluegrass and “Born Yesterday.” Other activities to participate in – and feel good about – are the 15th annual James River Regional Cleanup and the 5th annual Richmond Out of the Darkness Community Walk. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

When the cliche stands tall

Inspirational football movie tries too hard for its own good
When the Game Stands Tall is based on a true story – an unbelievable true story that takes the word “inspiring” about as far as it can go.

It’s a film about Bob Ladouceur, coach of the De La Salle High Spartans, a California high school football team with 12 consecutive undefeated seasons (a staggering 151 games won in a row).

Along the way, Ladouceur (played by Jim Caviezel) faced the kind of hardship most football coaches (thankfully) can only imagine – suffering a near-fatal heart attack, the death of a star player, and rebuilding the team after that 151-game streak came to a humiliating end. > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


Enjoy political comedy at its finest with The Capitol Steps at The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen. Methodist and Baptist churches unite for the fourth annual Mission Footprint 5K, taking place at Trinity UMC. Or in honor of Grandparent’s Day on Sunday, treat them to A Grand Family Affair or maybe a movie – the 1978 film “Superman” is at the Henrico Theatre. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

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The Short Pump Ruritan Club is seeking crafters for its 24th annual craft show, which will be held Saturday, Oct. 25, at Short Pump Middle School, 4701 Pouncey Tract Road.… Full text

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