Financial status has paid big dividends for county

In the annals of Henrico's rich history, what happened one day in 1998 certainly wouldn't register high on the excitement scale or the public-interest barometer.

But on that day, the financial status of the county entered rarified air, elevating Henrico to a perch occupied by fewer than 30 other localities in the nation and giving it financial flexibility that most envy. On that day, when Fitch IBCA gave Henrico a triple-A (AAA) bond rating – the highest possible long-term rating – the county also became even more attractive to potential corporations looking for a home.


The Fitch IBCA announcement made Henrico one of just a small number of counties in the nation to hold AAA ratings from each of the three major bond-rating agencies (Moody's Investor Service and Standard & Poors Corp. had previously awarded the county their 'AAA' ratings in 1977).

Joining that 'triple AAA' group, which today numbers 34, solidified Henrico as one of the best-managed counties in the nation, too, and signaled its strength to businesses.

"Ratings really are the ultimate report card for a local government," Henrico Finance Director John Vithoulkas said. "It's a key component to our economic development strategy, because the large, savvy corporate clients like to look at things like triple-A ratings."

The achievement ranks No. 19 on the Henrico Citizen's list of the 24 most significant moments in Henrico's 400-year history.

Most Henrico citizens also have benefitted from what happened on that day in 1998, though they may not realize it.

The reason: the stronger a locality's rating, the lower the interest rates it's able to acquire when it sells long-term bonds to finance the construction of roads, schools and other capital improvement projects. When Henrico sells bonds to fund projects here, its flawless standing means that its rates are among the lowest available to any jurisdiction in the nation.

"These ratings are the highest possible and represent the greatest level of confidence by institutional investors in the fiscal affairs of these governments," County Manager Virgil Hazelett said. "Having one of these very rare ratings results in annual savings in the millions for our residents."

The lower rates allow Henrico to keep its debt service payments low each year; the county is expected to have a debt of about $499.9 million as of June 30, and its debt service payments in the 2011-12 fiscal year will represent less than 7 percent of its general fund budget. And county officials have been able to refinance debt on several occasions to save even more money.

The difference between an AAA-rated bond and a AA+-rated bond (the next highest classification) could be as much as 25 basis points, or about 0.25 percent, Vithoulkas said.

"That's a huge difference when you're issuing millions in bonds," Vithoulkas said.

Savings in the millions
In recent years, through four bond sales alone, the county saved more than $18 million. One of those sales occurred one day after the state of Virginia (also a triple triple-A-rated entity) sold bonds itself. Henrico's sale came in nearly 15 basis points lower.

"It was one of those, 'Did that just happen?' moments," Vithoulkas recalled.

During the past several years, Henrico has been joined on the triple triple-A list by neighbors Chesterfield and Hanover counties – giving the metro Richmond region a nearly unmatched financial triumverate. When combined with Virginia's triple AAA status, Vithoulkas said, "It's no coincidence that Virginia is always No. 1 or No. 2 in the listings of best states for companies to locate."

Henrico's proposed 2011-12 fiscal year budget calls for the sale of $33.3 million in general obligation bonds from a bond referendum approved by county voters in 2005. Another referendum is anticipated in coming years to fund additional school and general government projects.

Each time the county seeks to sell bonds, agencies issue ratings. County officials must hold conference calls or meet in person with the rating agency officials who are evaluating their credit-worthiness. County officials also visit the rating agencies every few years in New York to undergo thorough reviews of Henrico's finances.

"It's a very stressful time," Vithoulkas said, "because you basically are going up there and saying, 'Take a look at what we've done financially and give us a grade.' You're going up there with the [county's] operating budget, capital budget, long term financial plans, an audit of the county – basically a number of documents that represent how the county has been managed."

Since 1998, those trips have resulted in continued confidence from each agency.

"These ratings are something we have worked very hard to obtain over many years," Hazelett said. "While there have been a significant number of municipal downgrades during this difficult economy, I am very proud to say that Henrico remains at the top echelon for local governments.

"These ratings are something that many corporate entities look at when deciding where to locate or expand their businesses. Coupled with our low tax rate environment, excellent services, and high quality of life, Henrico is an extremely attractive location within the continental United States."
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Democrat VanValkenburg kicks off Gen. Assembly campaign


Senior students at Glen Allen High School will get a personal touch when studying elections with their AP government teacher.

That teacher, Schuyler VanValkenburg, recently announced his intention to seek the Democratic nomination for the 72nd District seat in the House of Delegates. If he earns the nomination, he will run against Del. Jimmie Massie, R-Henrico, who has been unopposed for 10 years.

VanValkenburg, a 2004 University of Richmond alumnus who majored in history, is running for office for the first time. Although he has lived in Richmond since he began his undergraduate studies, aside from one year spent in Seattle, he said he never felt it was his time to run. > Read more.

Construction begins on JA Finance Park at Libbie Mill


School and business leaders from around the region, including (pictured, from left) Simon Hodges of Dominion Resources, Daphne Swanso(president of Junior Achievement of Central Virginia) and Henrico County Manager John Vithoulkas, gathered at Libbie Mill Library Feb. 23 for the Junior Achievement Finance Park construction kickoff. > Read more.

Assembly poised to OK state budget on Friday


Finishing a day early, House and Senate negotiators agreed on a budget Wednesday that includes employee pay raises and more money for K-12 education and mental health.

The negotiators presented their budget to their fellow lawmakers in time for the required 48-hour review, which could be completed by Friday night with a chance to adjourn their 2017 session before Saturday’s target date.

Republican leaders in the House and Senate praised the spending plan’s conservative fiscal policies. > Read more.

Section of Charles City Road to close beginning Feb. 26


A section of Charles City Road, from Lewis Road to South Airport Drive, will be closed beginning Sunday, Feb. 26 as part of a project to widen and improve the road.

The Henrico County Department of Public Works expects the closure to last for a few weeks.

Westbound traffic on Charles City will be detoured around the work zone by way of South Airport, Seven Hills Boulevard and Laburnum Avenue. > Read more.

ACLU urges McAuliffe to veto anti-immigration bills


Officials with the American Civil Liberties Union called on Gov. Terry McAuliffe on Wednesday to veto Republican-backed legislation banning local governments in Virginia from designating themselves as sanctuaries for undocumented immigrants. They also said they plan to fight federal and state policies that they believe violate immigrants’ rights.

At a news conference, representatives of the ACLU of Virginia and other civil rights organizations criticized anti-immigrant measures passed by the General Assembly. They also condemned the recent spike in deportation raids on immigrant communities in Virginia by federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement, as well as President Donald Trump’s recent executive order banning immigrants from seven mostly Muslim countries. > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


Given the warm weather lately, Saturday’s RVA Polar Plunge Winter Fest, benefiting Special Olympics Virginia, might actually be enjoyable! Other weekend events you’re sure to enjoy include the 14th annual Richmond Kids Expo at the Richmond Raceway Complex, the Richmond Symphony and The Taters in concert at The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen, and the Richmond Ballet Minds in Motion Team XXL performing at the Henrico Theatre. This is also the last weekend to check out HATTheatre’s production of “Bill W. and Dr. Bob.” For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

 

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