Especially rewarding

Va. Special Olympics celebrate 30 years
With the help of more than 4,000 volunteers and the support and generosity of local businesses, 1,400 athletes, their coaches and their families were able to travel from 31 different areas all over Virginia to take part in the Special Olympics 2012 Summer Games.

Athletes competed in a number of events, such as power lifting, tennis and various track and field competitions at the games, held June 8-9 at the University of Richmond and other locations.

This year’s Games marked the 30th year that the majority of the event has been held on Richmond’s campus.

“We have seen a lot of things change and grow over the years,” said Holly Claytor, who has been the director of Public Relations for Special Olympics Virginia for the past five years. “They have been such a great partner and we are very appreciative of that.”

Special Olympics Virginia is a sporting organization for people with intellectual disabilities.

“Through sports, we want to build a bigger and better community by bringing people together and opening their minds to the value of people with IDs,” Claytor said. “When people come out and experience the Special Olympics, they learn not only about the program but they also learn more about themselves.”

Through SOV fundraising efforts and various donations, the athletes were able to take part in the two-day event, as well as have meals at the dining hall, a room in which to stay for the night and a dance at the close of the games, at no cost to their families.

“We have wonderful support from donors so the athletes do not have to pay to participate,” Claytor said.

After the initial day of sporting events was complete, the opening ceremony took place in the Robins Center. Before the ceremony began, participants stood outside and applauded as local police officers finished the final leg of the Law Enforcement Torch Run. Each year, more than 2,000 officers in Virginia are involved in the run, which covers almost 2,000 miles, raising awareness and money for the Special Olympics. Since it began 27 years ago, the Torch Run has raised more than $14 million, and this year alone, it raised $924,000.

The lighting of the cauldron with the Flame of Hope brought the official opening of the Special Olympics Summer Games.

Before the lighting of the cauldron, which was built especially for this year’s games and was unveiled to the public for the first time, the crowd heard from several officials, including Richard Jeffrey, president of Special Olympics Virginia; Donnie Knowlson, chairman of Special Olympics Virginia Board of Directors; and Ed Ayers, president of the University of Richmond.

Danny Rocco, the head football coach at Richmond, encouraged athletes to “be your best when it matters the most,” garnering loud cheers from the audience.

Bill Boddie, of Boddie-Noell Enterprises, told participants that he enjoyed being able to watch the program continue to grow and get better each year.

“We believe in your vision, your mission and your cause,” Boddie said. “You truly are an inspiration to all of us.”

Day Two commenced with the power lifting portion, in which participants were grouped by skill level and had to compete in various events, such as squatting, dead lifting and bench pressing. Current members of the football team at Richmond volunteered their time by setting up the weights and helping the athletes, if necessary. Athlete Chris Mayo was the talk of the Robins Center after he squatted more than 400 pounds as fans excitedly cheered him on and
helped him break his own personal record.

While lifting was taking place inside, teammates Jason Smith and Tamal Lee were making an impact on the track. Smith and Lee have been competing in the Special Olympics for the past 22 years, when they first entered track and field events as teenagers. Lee competed in the 100-meter run and won a gold medal in the javelin throw, while Smith took gold in his javelin throw and silver in the 100 meter run.

“I know that I have to work out harder next year so I can win the gold,” Smith said.

Lee said that he always had a lot of fun while at the Special Olympics because he enjoyed staying in the dorms and seeing his friends. The best part of the entire weekend? “There are a bunch of girls here,” he said, with a grin on his face.

With the end of the events on Saturday came the closing ceremony in the Robins Center. The cauldron was extinguished, the lights were turned off, everyone was given glow sticks and the athletes were able to dance with their friends, old and new, to mark the closing of the games.

Among the businesses that contributed to the games were Coca Cola, Sheetz, Comcast, Hardee’s (which handed out free burgers and smoothies), Sweet Frog (whose mascots posed for pictures with the athletes) and Rising Up Sports, which sponsored a live stream of the swimming events so family members who were not able to attend could
still be part of the festivities.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

RVA Polar Plunge raises $40k for Special Olympics


More than 300 participants took the plunge for charity Feb. 25 at The Shops at Willow Lawn, raising $40,000 for the Special Olympics of Virginia as part of the 2017 RVA Polar Plunge Fest. Participants jumped into frigid water as part of the event, having raised money through donations leading up to the event.

“At Special Olympics Virginia, our vision is to inspire the first unified generation; a generation of people who respectfully include each other in the school, in the workplace, in the community,” said Rick Jeffrey, Special Olympics Virginia President. “Plunging this past Saturday included people with intellectual disabilities and those without; people of all ages, genders, races and religions; students and teachers; doctors and lawyers; military and law enforcement; one for all; all for one." > Read more.

Fundraiser bags more than $50k


CancerLINC's 11th annual "It’s in the Bag" event raised more than $50,000. The event, presented by Virginia Cancer Institute, was held at The Westin Richmond in Henrico Feb. 2 and was attended by more than 200 people.

“It's in the Bag” included handbag designer Thaddeus DuBois and his family from Syracuse, Ind. DuBois brought four handcrafted handbags, which were auctioned off and raised more than $4,000. Three autographed handbags from “Sex and the City” star Sarah Jessica Parker also brought funds. > Read more.

A date with states


Above, Varina’s Andre Watkins drives to the basket during the Blue Devils’ 52-51 win against Hampton in the Group 5A third-place game at Hermitage High School Feb. 25. Below, Tyrese Jenkins drives to the basket during the game. The Blue Devils (21-6 on the season), who earlier last month defeated Hermitage, 53-34, to earn a spot in the 5A state tournament, next will face Albemarle in that tournament. It is the program’s first trip to the state tournament since 2001 and first under fourth-year coach Andrew Lacey, who has turned around a team that was 6-14 during his first season. > Read more.

Future public servants observe lawmaking firsthand


For the past two months, they showed up every day at the state Capitol, dressed in matching blazers and carrying pen and paper at the ready – the next generation of public servants carefully observing their superiors.

These young adults are known as pages. They are middle school and high school students from around Virginia who assist in everyday tasks at the General Assembly to experience firsthand how the legislative process works.

The program dates as far back as 1850, when the one page who worked was paid $2 a day. > Read more.

CRLC seeks donations for Malvern Hill Farm


The Capital Region Land Conservancy (CRLC) is seeking to raise $100,000 in 30 days to cover due diligence and closing costs associated with the historic Malvern Hill Farm. These include boundary survey, Phase I ESA, title search and insurance, recording fees, taxes, and legal work as well as a Section 106 review.

CRLC is scheduled to close on the purchase of the property May 31, and is asking community members to help support the site's acquisition. All donations will help CRLC leverage $1 million in matching funds. > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


Given the warm weather lately, Saturday’s RVA Polar Plunge Winter Fest, benefiting Special Olympics Virginia, might actually be enjoyable! Other weekend events you’re sure to enjoy include the 14th annual Richmond Kids Expo at the Richmond Raceway Complex, the Richmond Symphony and The Taters in concert at The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen, and the Richmond Ballet Minds in Motion Team XXL performing at the Henrico Theatre. This is also the last weekend to check out HATTheatre’s production of “Bill W. and Dr. Bob.” For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

 

March 2017
S M T W T F S
·
·
·
14
15
·

Calendar page

Classifieds

Place an Ad | More Classifieds

Calendar

The Ashland Beekeepers Association will offer the four-session class “A Beekeeper Introductory Short Course” on Mondays, March 6-27, from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Family Life Baptist Church, 206 S. Washington Hwy. in Ashland. Class topics include honey bee biology, beekeeper equipment, seasonal hive management, pest and disease management and more. An optional visit to an apiary for an actual hive inspection will be offered. Cost is $60 per person; additional members of the same household are $30 per person. To register, visit http://www.ashlandvabeekeepers.org. Full text

Your weather just got better.

Henricopedia

Henrico's Top Teachers

The Plate